304 results for raspberry pi model
When we announced the Raspberry Pi 2 back in February, we said that we’d continue to support its predecessor, the Raspberry Pi Model B+. Since then, we’ve sold well over a million units of Raspberry Pi 2, but Model B+ has also continued to sell very well, despite also costing $35. A side effect of … Continue reading →
When we announced the Model B+ back in July, we said that we’d also be producing a lower-cost variant, analogous to the original Model A. Since then, James has been beavering away, and today we’re pleased to announce the release of the Raspberry Pi Model A+ at a new low price of $20. Like the … Continue reading →
Meet your new favourite piece of hardware. In the two years since we launched the current Raspberry Pi Model B, we’ve often talked about our intention to do one more hardware revision to incorporate the numerous small improvements people have been asking for. This isn’t a “Raspberry Pi 2”, but rather the final evolution of the original … Continue reading →
TL;DR: you can now get the 1.4GHz clock speed, 5GHz wireless networking and improved thermals of Raspberry Pi 3B+ in a smaller form factor, and at the smaller price of $25. Meet the Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+. New Product Alert: Raspberry Pi 3A+ You can now get the 1.4GHz clock speed, 5GHz wireless networking … Continue reading →

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ extends the Raspberry Pi 3 range into the A+ board format.

  • Broadcom BCM2837B0, Cortex-A53 (ARMv8) 64-bit SoC @ 1.4GHz
  • 512MB LPDDR2 SDRAM
  • 2.4GHz and 5GHz IEEE 802.11.b/g/n/ac wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2/BLE
  • Extended 40-pin GPIO header
  • Full-size HDMI
  • Single USB 2.0 ports
  • CSI camera port for connecting a Raspberry Pi Camera Module
  • DSI display port for connecting a Raspberry Pi Touch Display
  • 4-pole stereo output and composite video port
  • Micro SD port for loading your operating system and storing data
  • 5V/2.5A DC power input

PRODUCT BRIEF, MECHANICAL DRAWINGS, AND SCHEMATICS

HARDWARE SPECIFICATIONS

More detailed information on Raspberry Pi hardware is available.

OBSOLESCENCE STATEMENT

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model A+ will remain in production until at least January 2023.

Buy now →

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ is the latest product in the Raspberry Pi 3 range.

  • Broadcom BCM2837B0, Cortex-A53 (ARMv8) 64-bit SoC @ 1.4GHz
  • 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM
  • 2.4GHz and 5GHz IEEE 802.11.b/g/n/ac wireless LAN, Bluetooth 4.2, BLE
  • Gigabit Ethernet over USB 2.0 (maximum throughput 300 Mbps)
  • Extended 40-pin GPIO header
  • Full-size HDMI
  • 4 USB 2.0 ports
  • CSI camera port for connecting a Raspberry Pi camera
  • DSI display port for connecting a Raspberry Pi touchscreen display
  • 4-pole stereo output and composite video port
  • Micro SD port for loading your operating system and storing data
  • 5V/2.5A DC power input
  • Power-over-Ethernet (PoE) support (requires separate PoE HAT)

PRODUCT BRIEF, MECHANICAL DRAWINGS, AND SCHEMATICS

HARDWARE SPECIFICATIONS

More detailed information on Raspberry Pi hardware is available.

OBSOLESCENCE STATEMENT

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ will remain in production until at least January 2023.

Buy now →
Here’s a long post. We think you’ll find it interesting. If you don’t have time to read it all, we recommend you watch this video, which will fill you in with everything you need, and then head straight to the product page to fill yer boots. (We recommend the video anyway, even if you do have … Continue reading →

The Raspberry Pi 3 Model B is the earliest model of the third-generation Raspberry Pi. It replaced the Raspberry Pi 2 Model B in February 2016. See also the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+, the latest product in the Raspberry Pi 3 range.

  • Quad Core 1.2GHz Broadcom BCM2837 64bit CPU
  • 1GB RAM
  • BCM43438 wireless LAN and Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) on board
  • 100 Base Ethernet
  • 40-pin extended GPIO
  • 4 USB 2 ports
  • 4 Pole stereo output and composite video port
  • Full size HDMI
  • CSI camera port for connecting a Raspberry Pi camera
  • DSI display port for connecting a Raspberry Pi touchscreen display
  • Micro SD port for loading your operating system and storing data
  • Upgraded switched Micro USB power source up to 2.5A
Buy now →

Compared to the Raspberry Pi 1 it has:

  • A 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU
  • 1GB RAM

Like the (Pi 1) Model B+, it also has:

  • 100 Base Ethernet
  • 4 USB ports
  • 40 GPIO pins
  • Full HDMI port
  • Combined 3.5mm audio jack and composite video
  • Camera interface (CSI)
  • Display interface (DSI)
  • Micro SD card slot
  • VideoCore IV 3D graphics core
Buy now →

Compared to the Model B it has:

  • More GPIO pins. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model A and B.
  • More USB ports. It comes with 4 USB 2.0 ports, compared to 2 on the Model B, and better hotplug and overcurrent behaviour.
  • Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version.
  • 100 Base Ethernet (same as the original Model B)
  • Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W.
  • Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply.
  • Neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connectors with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes.
Buy now →

Compared to the Model A it has:

  • More GPIO pins. The GPIO header has grown to 40 pins, while retaining the same pinout for the first 26 pins as the Model A and B.
  • Micro SD. The old friction-fit SD card socket has been replaced with a much nicer push-push micro SD version.
  • Lower power consumption. By replacing linear regulators with switching ones we’ve reduced power consumption by between 0.5W and 1W.
  • Better audio. The audio circuit incorporates a dedicated low-noise power supply.
  • Smaller neater form factor. We’ve aligned the USB connector with the board edge, moved composite video onto the 3.5mm jack, and added four squarely-placed mounting holes. Model A+ is approximately 2cm shorter than the Model A.
Buy now →
A cheaper, low power spin of the original Raspberry Pi … Continue reading →
Of course, Model A is not the only new bit of hardware we’re releasing in 2013. JamesH just sent me these pictures of the forthcoming camera board to whet your appetite. This is the final hardware; we’ve been working on tuning (Gert tells me that picture quality is “pretty good” at the moment, but we’re … Continue reading →
Looking for this year’s perfect something to put under the tree ‘from Santa’? Well, look no further than right here — it’s time for our traditional Christmas shopping list! Woohoo! Which Raspberry Pi? As you are no doubt aware, the Raspberry Pi comes in more than one variety. And if you’re planning to give a … Continue reading →
Hey folks, Rob from The MagPi here! Halloween is over and November has just begun, which means CHRISTMAS IS ALMOST HERE! It’s never too early to think about Christmas — I start in September, the moment mince pies hit shelves. What most people seem to dread about Christmas is finding the right gifts, so I’m … Continue reading →
Today we are excited to launch a new add-on board for your Raspberry Pi: the Raspberry Pi TV HAT, on sale now at $21.50. The TV HAT connects to the 40-pin GPIO header and to a suitable antenna, allowing your Raspberry Pi to receive DVB-T2 television broadcasts. Watch TV with your Raspberry Pi With the … Continue reading →
When Dave shared his Raspberry Pi Zero–powered model of the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse on Reddit, we fell a little bit in love. Hello from the Trinity Buoy Wharf Lighthouse Dave was getting married inside London’s only lighthouse, situated at Trinity Buoy Wharf across the water from the O2 Arena. The Trinity Buoy Wharf lighthouse sits at the … Continue reading →
Play back video and sound on your television using your turntable and the VinylVideo converter, as demonstrated by YouTuber Techmoan. VinylVideo – Playing video from a 45rpm record With a VinylVideo convertor you can play video from a vinyl record played on a standard record player. Curiosity, tech-demo or art? A brief history of VinylVideo … Continue reading →
YouTuber MickMake has been working hard on producing a Raspberry Pi pocket projector with the Raspberry Pi Zero W. We’re excited. We know you’re excited. So enough of us talking, here’s Mick with more! #210 Build a Pi Zero W pocket projector! // Project 2 for 10 PCBs (48 hour quick turn around): https://jlcpcb.com/?ref=mickmake Make … Continue reading →
Hi folks, Rob from The MagPi here! As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to learn to code to make a video game. I’m technically working on one right now! It’s wildly behind my self-imposed schedule, though. If you too wish to learn how to make games, then check out issue 73 … Continue reading →
Recently shared by Bare Conductive, Hwan Yun‘s interactive installation, Intuition, uses a Raspberry Pi and Bare Conductive tech to transport you to the calm wonder of Icelandic nature. Intuition (2017) Interactive sound installation electric paint on paper Listhús Gallery Incorporation Bare Conductive Bare Conductive’s water-based Electric Paint allows users to incorporate safe conductivity into their … Continue reading →
Carputers! Fabrice Aneche is documenting his ongoing build, which equips an older (2011) car with some of the features a 2018 model might have: thus far, a reversing camera (bought off the shelf, with a modified GUI to show the date and the camera’s output built with Qt and Golang), GPS and offline route guidance. … Continue reading →
Today marks Harry Potter’s 38th birthday. And as we’re so, so very British here at Raspberry Pi, we have no choice but to celebrate the birth of The Boy Who Lived with some wonderfully magical projects from members of the community. Build your own Daily Prophet After a trip to The Wizarding World of Harry … Continue reading →
Engineerish is back with another Raspberry Pi–based project that you didn’t know you needed until now. PRINT MAZES WITH RASPBERRY PI Don’t already have a device around your home that, at the press of a button, prints something cool? Build one! Mine prints randomly generated mazes but why stop there? Thermal printer: https://www.adafruit.com/product/597 Source code: … Continue reading →
Today’s blog post comes from Jacob Salmela, creator of Pi-hole, a network-wide ad blocker used by Raspberry Pi enthusiasts to block advertisements on all devices connected to their home network. What is Pi hole? An explainer video about the network-wide ad blocker and how to install it. What is Pi-hole? Pi-hole is a network-wide ad … Continue reading →
3D printing has become far more accessible for hobbyists, with printer prices now in the hundreds instead of thousands of pounds. Last year, we covered some of the best 3D-printable cases for the Pi, and since then, Raspberry Pi enthusiasts have shared even more cool designs on sites such as MyMiniFactory and Thingiverse! Here are … Continue reading →
With the recent announcement of the 2019 Pi Wars dates, we’ve collected some essential online resources to help you get started in the world of competitive robots. Robotics 101 Before you can strap chainsaws and flamethrowers to your robot, you need to learn some basics. Sorry. As part of our mission to put digital making … Continue reading →
A hanging plotter, also known as a polar plotter or polargraph, is a machine for drawing images on a vertical surface. It does so by using motors to control the length of two cords that form a V shape, supporting a pen where they meet. We’ve featured one on this blog before: Norbert “HomoFaciens” Heinz’s … Continue reading →
Naturebytes are making their weatherproof Wildlife Cam Case available as a standalone product for the first time, a welcome addition to the Raspberry Pi ecosystem that should take some of the hassle out of your outdoor builds. Weatherproofing digital making projects People often use Raspberry Pis and Camera Modules for outdoor projects, but weatherproofing your … Continue reading →
In their latest video and tutorial, Electronic Hub shows you how to detect colour using a Raspberry Pi and a TCS3200 colour sensor. Raspberry Pi Color Sensor (TCS3200) Interface | Color Detector A simple Raspberry Pi based project using TCS3200 Color Sensor. The project demonstrates how to interface a Color Sensor (like TCS3200) with Raspberry … Continue reading →
It’s been just over three weeks since we launched the new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+. Although the product is branded Raspberry Pi 3B+ and not Raspberry Pi 4, a serious amount of engineering was involved in creating it. The wireless networking, USB/Ethernet hub, on-board power supplies, and BCM2837 chip were all upgraded: together these … Continue reading →
As they sail aboard their floating game design studio Pino, Rekka Bellum and Devine Lu Linvega are starting to explore the use of Raspberry Pis. As part of an experimental development tool and a weather station, Pis are now aiding them on their nautical adventures! Mar 2018: A Smart Sailboat Pino is on its way … Continue reading →
Hi folks, Rob from The MagPi here! You may remember that a couple of weeks ago, the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+ was released, the updated version of the Raspberry Pi 3 Model B. It’s better, faster, and stronger than the original and it’s also the main topic in The MagPi issue 68, out now! … Continue reading →
We love Mugsy, the Raspberry Pi coffee robot that has smashed its crowdfunding goal within days! Our latest YouTube video shows our catch-up with Mugsy and its creator Matthew Oswald at Maker Faire New York last year. MUGSY THE RASPBERRY PI COFFEE ROBOT #MFNYC Uploaded by Raspberry Pi on 2018-03-22. Mugsy Labelled ‘the world’s first hackable, … Continue reading →
Unless you’ve been AFK for the last two days, you’ll no doubt be aware of the release of the brand-spanking-new Raspberry Pi 3 Model B+. With faster connectivity, more computing power, Power over Ethernet (PoE) pins, and the same $35 price point, the new board has been a hit across all our social media accounts! … Continue reading →
Fred Fourie is building a low-cost underwater camera for shallow deployment, and his prototypes are already returning fascinating results. You can build your own PipeCam, and explore the undiscovered depths with a Raspberry Pi and off-the-shelf materials. Materials and build In its latest iteration, PipeCam consists of a 110mm PVC waste pipe with fittings and a … Continue reading →
A robot pet is the dream of many a child, thanks to creatures such as K9, Doctor Who’s trusted companion, and the Tamagotchi, bleeping nightmare of parents worldwide. But both of these pale in comparison (sorry, K9) to Petoi, the walking, meowing, live-streaming cat from maker Rongzhong Li. Petoi: OpenCat Demo Mentioned on IEEE Spectrum: … Continue reading →
Piano keys are so limiting! Why not swap them out for LEDs and the wealth of instruments in Pygame to build air keys, as demonstrated by Instructables maker 2fishy? Raspberry Pi LED Light Schroeder Piano – Twinkle Little Star Raspberry Pi LED Light Schroeder Piano – Twinkle Little Star Keys? Where we’re going you don’t … Continue reading →
Hack your COZMO for ultimate control, using a Raspberry Pi and this tutorial from Instructables user Marcelo ‘mjrovai’ Rovai. Cozmo – RPi 4 Full integration The complete tutorial can be found here: https://www.instructables.com/id/When-COZMO-the-Robot-Meets-the-Raspberry-Pi/ COZMO COZMO is a Python-programmable robot from ANKI that boasts a variety of on-board sensors and a camera, and that can be controlled … Continue reading →
After getting in contact with us to share their latest build with us, we invited Matvey Fridman of Germany-based production company Spiegelbilder Studio to write a guest blog post about their CRT video walls created for the band STRANDKØNZERT. STRANDKØNZERT – TAGTRAUMER – OFFICIAL VIDEO GERMAN DJENT RAP / EST. 2017. COMPLETE DIY-PROJECT. CRT video … Continue reading →
As Simon mentioned in his recent blog post about Raspbian Stretch, we have developed a new piece of software called PiServer. Use this tool to easily set up a network of client Raspberry Pis connected to a single x86-based server via Ethernet. With PiServer, you don’t need SD cards, you can control all clients via … Continue reading →
Beating the contestants at Countdown: is it cheating if you happen to know every word in the English dictionary? Rosie plays Countdown Allow your robots to join in the fun this Christmas with a round of Channel 4’s Countdown. https://www.rosietheredrobot.com/2017/12/tea-minus-30.html Rosie the Red Robot First, a little bit of backstory. Challenged by his eldest daughter … Continue reading →
She asked for help, and you came to her aid. Pioneers, the winners of the Only you can save us challenge have been picked! Can you see me? Only YOU can save us! I need your help. This is a call out for those between 11- and 16-years-old in the UK and Republic of Ireland. … Continue reading →
Looking for the perfect Christmas gift for a beloved maker in your life? Maybe you’d like to give a relative or friend a taste of the world of coding and Raspberry Pi? Whatever you’re looking for, the Raspberry Pi Christmas shopping list will point you in the right direction. For those getting started Thinking about … Continue reading →
In today’s guest post, Bruce Tulloch, CEO and Managing Director of BitScope Designs, discusses the uses of cluster computing with the Raspberry Pi, and the recent pilot of the Los Alamos National Laboratory 3000-Pi cluster built with the BitScope Blade. High-performance computing and Raspberry Pi are not normally uttered in the same breath, but Los Alamos … Continue reading →
Programa de revendedor aprovado agora no Brasil — our Approved Reseller programme is live in Brazil, with Anatel-approved Raspberry Pis in a rather delicious shade of blue on sale from today. The challenge The difficulty in buying our products — and the lack of Anatel certification — have been consistent points of feedback from our … Continue reading →
TL;DR pip install numpy used to take ages, and now it’s super fast thanks to piwheels. The Python Package Index (PyPI) is a package repository for Python modules. Members of the Python community publish software and libraries in it as an easy method of distribution. If you’ve ever used pip install, PyPI is the service … Continue reading →
Back in May 2013, we heard from Dominique Laloux about an exciting project to bring Raspberry Pi labs to schools in rural West Africa. Until 2012, 75 percent of teachers there had never used a computer. The project has been very successful, and Dominique has been in touch again to bring us the latest news. … Continue reading →
We’ve all been there: zombies at the door, Daleks on the driveway, creatures from the Upside Down in the walls. You want to be able to monitor their movements, but how do you do that without attracting their attention? Wesley Archer (AKA Raspberry Coulis) has the answer: a Pi-powered Night Vision Camera, perfect for catching … Continue reading →
In 2015, The Raspberry Pi Foundation built two space-hardened Raspberry Pi units, or Astro Pis, to run student code on board the International Space Station (ISS). Astro Pi upgrades Each school year we run an Astro Pi challenge to find the next generation of space scientists to program them. After the students have their code run … Continue reading →
With a £1000 grant from Santander, Poppy Mosbacher set out to build a full-body 3D body scanner with the intention of creating an affordable setup for makespaces and similar community groups. First Scan from DIY Raspberry Pi Scanner Head and Shoulders Scan with 29 Raspberry Pi Cameras Uses for full-body 3D scanning Poppy herself wanted … Continue reading →
GPIO Zero v1.4 is out now! It comes with a set of new features, including a handy pinout command line tool. To start using this newest version of the API, update your Raspbian OS now: sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade Some of the things we’ve added will make it easier for you try … Continue reading →
Unless you’re planning to fit your Raspberry Pi inside a build, you may find yourself in need of a case to protect it from dust, damage and/or the occasional pet attack. Here are some of our favourite 3D-printed cases, for which files are available online so you can recreate them at home. TARDIS TARDIS Raspberry … Continue reading →
Plane spotting, like train spotting, is a hobby enjoyed by many a tech enthusiast. Nick Sypteras has built a voice-controlled plane identifier using a Raspberry Pi and an Amazon Echo Dot. What plane is that? There’s a great write-up on Nick’s blog describing how he went about this. In addition to the Pi and the … Continue reading →
Physics! Particles! Statistical modelling! Quantum theory! How can non-scientists understand any of it? Well, students from Durham University are here to help you wrap your head around it all – and to our delight, they’re using the power of the Raspberry Pi to do it! At the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition, taking place in London … Continue reading →
The maker of one of our favourite projects from this year’s Maker Faire Bay Area took the idea of an ’embedded device’ and ran with it: Ronald McCollam has created a wireless, completely epoxy-encased Pi build – screen included! Just encase… Of course, this build is not meant to be a museum piece: Ronald embedded a Raspberry Pi 3 … Continue reading →
OpenEnergyMonitor, who make open-source tools for energy monitoring, have been using Raspberry Pi since we launched in 2012. Like Raspberry Pi, they manufacture their hardware in Wales and send it to people all over the world. We invited co-founder Glyn Hudson to tell us why they do what they do, and how Raspberry Pi helps. … Continue reading →
Julia is a free and open-source general purpose programming language made specifically for scientific computing. It combines the ease of writing in high-level languages like Python and Ruby with the technical power of MATLAB and Mathematica and the speed of C. Julia is ideal for university-level scientific programming and it’s used in research. Some time … Continue reading →
While he and his son played with LEGO, Berlin-based programmer Jannis Hermanns had the urge to build a replica of one of the first computers he remembers using: the Macintosh Classic. Cut to the addition of a Raspberry Pi Zero running Docker, and an e-paper display, and you have yourself the cutest tech build to blow … Continue reading →
Computers and chess have been a potent combination ever since the appearance of the first chess-playing computers in the 1970s. You might even be able to play a game of chess on the device you are using to read this blog post! For digital makers, though, adding a Raspberry Pi into the mix can be … Continue reading →
Rob from The MagPi here! We’re still incredibly excited about the brand-new, wireless-enabled Raspberry Pi Zero W, and it’s in our latest issue, out now. Here’s a video of me talking about it. Introducing Raspberry Pi Zero W The Raspberry Pi Zero W, the new wireless-enabled Raspberry Pi, is out now! Rob from The MagPi, … Continue reading →
Today is Raspberry Pi’s fifth birthday: it’s five years since we launched the original Raspberry Pi, selling a hundred thousand units in the first day, and setting us on the road to a lifetime total (so far) of over twelve million units. To celebrate, we’re announcing a new product: meet Raspberry Pi Zero W, a … Continue reading →
We’re a small organisation full of makers, and I think at least two of us own a hand loom for weaving textiles. (One of the reasons I enjoy the TV show Vikings so much is the casual looming that’s going on as backdrop in many of the indoor scenes – the textile sort, not the impending-doom … Continue reading →
When we started Raspberry Pi, we had a simple goal: to increase the number of people applying to study Computer Science at Cambridge. By putting cheap, programmable computers in the hands of the right young people, we hoped that we might revive some of the sense of excitement about computing that we had back in … Continue reading →
Over in a land of palm trees and breezy sunsets, Adafruit’s Noe Ruiz has been making things. (My Noe story: I waltzed up to him in the Adafruit factory once, grabbed his hand, pumped his arm up and down and said: “SO good to see you again. How’s your brother?” He looked deeply confused. Turns out we’d never … Continue reading →
We get to read about and see an abundance of project builds through online channels, but we especially love when we get the opportunity to meet the makers themselves as they share their projects first-hand. That’s why an event like Maker Faire continues to be so successful. It provides a platform and a dedicated space, if … Continue reading →
Earlier this week, the brand new Raspberry Pi Camera Module v2 was revealed to the world, its headline feature being an 8-megapixel sensor. It’s been a few years since the original came out and the new camera is an excellent little upgrade to the existing model; you can find out all the details in our complete … Continue reading →
Last month we published a guide on how to 3D print your own Astro Pi flight case. Since then we’ve seen some amazing examples pop up over on Twitter. My favorites have to be the two below. @KaceyandKristi posted this amazing rainbow flight case – great way to make the most of the layered design! … Continue reading →
On 29 February this year, we launched our newest computer, Raspberry Pi 3. Launch days see a rather large amount of traffic to our website, and as a newly released product, Pi 3 was a relatively untested hosting platform. So naturally our hosts at Mythic Beasts decided this would be the perfect occasion to try … Continue reading →
Another update: I managed to miss Baruyr Mirican and Darshan Gopal from the Broadcom test engineering team off the list too. My grade this year is D: must do better. Update: I did a rather poor job of collating the credits list this time. Apologies to Aravind Appajappa, Jeff Baer, Saran Kumar Seethapathi and Noumaan … Continue reading →
Background Back in December, British ESA astronaut Tim Peake took two specially augmented Raspberry Pis, called Astro Pis, to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of his six-month mission. These Astro Pis are running experimental Python programs written by school-age students; the results will be downloaded back to Earth and made available online for … Continue reading →
The Raspberry Pi Zero is half the size of a Model A+, with twice the utility. A tiny Raspberry Pi that’s affordable enough for any project! 1GHz, Single-core CPU 512MB RAM Mini-HDMI port Micro-USB OTG port Micro-USB power HAT-compatible 40-pin header Composite video and reset headers CSI camera connector (v1.3 only) … Continue reading →
Of all the things we do at Raspberry Pi, driving down the cost of computer hardware remains one of the most important. Even in the developed world, a programmable computer is a luxury item for a lot of people, and every extra dollar that we ask someone to spend decreases the chance that they’ll choose … Continue reading →
Friday was an exciting day for the Astro Pi mission, which will see British ESA astronaut Tim Peake operate two Astro Pi flight units, each one containing a Raspberry Pi and a Sense HAT, on board the International Space Station! Tim will use the Astro Pis to run experiments and applications designed by UK school … Continue reading →
This December, British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake will be taking two specially augmented Raspberry Pis called Astro Pis to the International Space Station (ISS) as part of his six-month mission. These Astro Pis will be running experimental Python programs written by school-age students; the results will be downloaded back to Earth and made available online … Continue reading →
There are many excellent things to be found in last week’s release of Raspbian Jessie and we’ve been keeping one of the best ones tucked under our big Raspberry Pi-shaped hat. In the Programming menu on the desktop you’ll find a new version of Scratch, our favourite programming language for beginners. Tim Rowledge, who has … Continue reading →
When we released Raspberry Pi 2 in February this year, we announced that Microsoft’s Windows 10 IoT Core, a version of Windows 10 for small Internet-of-Things devices that may or may not have a screen, would be available for the device. Since the Windows Insider release of Windows 10 Core in August, we’ve found that … Continue reading →
Liz: Today we’ve got a guest post from our friends at element14, who have been running a competition over the last few months that’s had Raspberry Pi owners making movie magic. Our very own James Adams did the judging, and we’ve really enjoyed seeing the entries – we think you’ll find them as amazing as we … Continue reading →
A few weeks ago Matt Timmons-Brown, The Raspberry Pi Guy, visited Pi Towers to interview Raspberry Pi Trading CEO Eben Upton. Over the course of an hour and a half, Matt drew Eben’s detailed answers on some of the topics that hundreds of you put forward in response to a call for questions. When might … Continue reading →
You’ve been incredibly patient: thank you. The official Raspberry Pi touch display is on sale today, priced at $60 (plus local taxes and shipping): you can buy it at RS Components/Allied Electronics and at Premier Farnell/Newark. Other sellers will be receiving stock later this week. We gave one to Alex Eames of RasPi.TV a couple of … Continue reading →
Today, a look at a speedy way for students to prototype, test, analyse and deploy sophisticated applications on Raspberry Pi, using industry tools: MathWorks’ MATLAB, a high-level programming environment for visualising and analysing data, computation, mathematical modelling, and algorithm development; and Simulink, which provides a block diagramming environment for modelling and simulating dynamic systems. element14 … Continue reading →
Sometimes added functionality isn’t exactly functional. Sometimes, it’s more a sort of demonstration that something can be done, whether or not it’s actually a very good idea. UK readers may not recognise the machine below, but those of you in the USA (as long as you’re of a certain vintage) will be familiar with it. It’s a … Continue reading →
Just over a week ago now we closed the secondary school phase of the Astro Pi competition after a one week extension to the deadline. Students from all over the UK have uploaded their code hoping that British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake will run it on the ISS later this year! Last week folks from … Continue reading →
Two and a half years ago, I found myself sitting in a car with Eben Upton about three days into my new job at Raspberry Pi. We discussed – among other things – everything we wanted to do with the Raspberry Pi hardware and with the products around the Pi. One of the things we discussed … Continue reading →
Last year we went into full retronerd dribble mode over the PiGRRL, a Pi-powered Gameboy. Our friends at Adafruit have brought the project up to date with the Pocket PiGRRL. It has a 3D printed case and uses the smaller Raspberry model A+ plus a 2.4″ PiTFT HAT to bring the size down. Emulation is handled by … Continue reading →
You can’t just take a Raspberry Pi into space in your pocket or an old soft scoop ice cream tub. It’s too spiky for one thing. What you need is a block of aluminium the size of your head and some mad milling skills to make the best Pi case ever. Dave Honess explains: The … Continue reading →
In case you hadn’t noticed, Issue 32 of The MagPi, the Raspberry Pi magazine, came out at the end of last week – and we think it’s terrific. This month’s issue is packed with tutorials, reviews, features about your Pi projects, and much more. As always, you’ll find lots and lots of content from the … Continue reading →
I do love a good demo. The folks at PubNub have been showing users of their software how home automation with a Raspberry Pi works – on an itty-bitty scale, with LEGO. This little house is rigged up with seven embedded LEDs (representing things like the stove and the fireplace, as well as lights); sensors to measure humidity, barometric … Continue reading →
Last Friday morning I got up at an unfamiliar hour to board a train to Leicester, where BBC Stargazing were broadcasting a special live show to coincide with the partial solar eclipse over the UK. Regular readers will have seen Dave Akerman write here last week of his plans to launch two Model A+ Pis … Continue reading →
Helen: We’re pleased to welcome back to the blog a regular guest, high-altitude balloonist Dave Akerman. You’ll have gathered that a noteworthy astronomical event is to take place across northern Europe on Friday, and as you’d expect, Dave has plans. We’ll let him tell you all about them. As you have probably heard by now, … Continue reading →
If you follow us on Twitter, you’ll notice that I put a call out earlier today for people who’d benchmarked their Raspberry Pi 2 – I wanted to be able to share some benchmarking results with you this afternoon. @Raspberry_Pi I’ve been running the Octane javascript benchmark on Node.JS and getting ~6X faster on the … Continue reading →
Let’s get the good stuff out of the way above the fold. Raspberry Pi 2 is now on sale for $35 (the same price as the existing Model B+), featuring: A 900MHz quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU (~6x performance) 1GB LPDDR2 SDRAM (2x memory) Complete compatibility with Raspberry Pi 1 Because it has an ARMv7 processor, … Continue reading →
Creative Director and Interactive Developer Michael Newman was tapped by UCLA Extension to design their 2015 winter course catalog cover. To accompany his work, he also designed, developed, and built a Raspberry Pi-powered interactive installation called Thirty-five Pixels which is currently on display at UCLA Extension’s 1010 Westwood building through the 2015 Winter Quarter. Although … Continue reading →
Christmas is coming, and we’re all panicking because we haven’t bought all the presents yet. (My Dad’s difficult.) Waking up at 3am in a cold sweat because you don’t know what to buy the Raspberry Pi fan in your life? Sweat no longer: we’re here to help! Raspberry Pi kits If you want a Raspberry Pi on its own, … Continue reading →
The MagPi magazine is a free download created by the Raspberry Pi community, for the Raspberry Pi community. Click the link, or on the picture, to visit their website. Here are the editors to explain what’s in this month’s issue: Welcome to Issue 29 of the MagPi, packed with the usual mixture of hardware projects … Continue reading →
Liz: Today’s guest post comes from Alex Eames, who runs the rather wonderful RasPi.TV. He’s been furtling through his drawers, and has discovered he owns a surprising number of Raspberry Pi variants. Thanks Alex!  Now we have the A+, I thought it’d be a good time to celebrate its ‘birth’ by having a rundown of the various … Continue reading →
I’m not alone at Pi Towers (hi Lorna! Hi Rachel!) in being a textiles nerd. There’s a 200-year-old cushion made of strips of worn-out Regency clothes (which nobody is allowed to sit on) in my living room; Mandarin sleeves I’ve rescued from rummage bins in Hong Kong and framed on the walls, and a rotation … Continue reading →
Back in July we wrote about an exciting project aiming to make computing accessible to school students in South Africa, where most schools have no computers at all and many lack electricity. Solar Powered Learning was raising funds for a Raspberry Pi computer lab at a secondary school in Johannesburg, with the aim of creating … Continue reading →
Earlier this year, we blogged about a shampoo ad that was running in the Swedish subway. A Pi hooked up to a motion sensor triggered a video effect on a billboard, so the model’s hair blew around in what looked like a response to the wind created every time a train came into the station. Swedish … Continue reading →
When we announced the launch of the Model B+ back in July, we emphasized that we’d be keeping the Model B in production. Since then, we’ve been (pleasantly) surprised by the ongoing demand for Model B from industrial customers, and a couple of weeks ago some tens of thousands of new units started to roll … Continue reading →