217 results for Camera Module
Wanting to break from the standard practice of updating old analogue cameras with digital technology, Alan Wang decided to retrofit a broken vintage camera flash with a Raspberry Pi Zero W to produce a video-capturing action cam. Raspberry Pi Zero Flash Cam Video Test Full story of this project: https://www.hackster.io/alankrantas/raspberry-pi-zero-flash-cam-359875 By hacking a somewhat gnarly… … Continue reading →
Long-time readers will remember Penguin Lifelines, one of our very favourite projects from back in the mists of time (which is to say 2014 — we have short memories around here). Click on penguins for fun and conservation Penguin Lifelines was a programme run by the Zoological Society of London, crowdsourcing the tracking of penguin colonies… … Continue reading →

The Raspberry Pi Camera Module v2 replaced the original Camera Module in April 2016. The v2 Camera Module has a Sony IMX219 8-megapixel sensor (compared to the 5-megapixel OmniVision OV5647 sensor of the original camera).

The Camera Module can be used to take high-definition video, as well as stills photographs. It’s easy to use for beginners, but has plenty to offer advanced users if you’re looking to expand your knowledge. There are lots of examples online of people using it for time-lapse, slow-motion, and other video cleverness. You can also use the libraries we bundle with the camera to create effects.

You can read all the gory details about IMX219 and the Exmor R back-illuminated sensor architecture on Sony’s website, but suffice to say this is more than just a resolution upgrade: it’s a leap forward in image quality, colour fidelity, and low-light performance. It supports 1080p30, 720p60 and VGA90 video modes, as well as still capture. It attaches via a 15cm ribbon cable to the CSI port on the Raspberry Pi.

The camera works with all models of Raspberry Pi 1, 2, and 3. It can be accessed through the MMAL and V4L APIs, and there are numerous third-party libraries built for it, including the Picamera Python library. See the Getting Started with Picamera resource to learn how to use it.

The camera module is very popular in home security applications, and in wildlife camera traps.

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Earlier this week, the brand new Raspberry Pi Camera Module v2 was revealed to the world, its headline feature being an 8-megapixel sensor. It’s been a few years since the original came out and the new camera is an excellent little upgrade to the existing model; you can find out all the details in our complete… … Continue reading →
Watch the video above and refer to the documentation page to connect your Camera Module or Pi NoIR. You’ll need to connect the camera module to the CSI port, located behind the Ethernet port, and enable the camera software. Once you’re connected, see our resource on Getting started with Picamera. … Continue reading →
If you have a Raspberry Pi camera module, you’ve probably used raspistill and raspivid, which are command line tools for using the camera. Dave Jones, a Database Admin, software developer and SQL know-it-all based in Manchester has been working on an equivalent, feature complete implementation of these in Python. This means you can access the… … Continue reading →
Of course, Model A is not the only new bit of hardware we’re releasing in 2013. JamesH just sent me these pictures of the forthcoming camera board to whet your appetite. This is the final hardware; we’ve been working on tuning (Gert tells me that picture quality is “pretty good” at the moment, but we’re… … Continue reading →
I was sent this image this morning from Gert (not pictured), Naush (right eye and half-moustache) and JamesH (stripy shirt and chin). It’s not a terribly exciting photo – until you realise that it’s the first picture ever taken from the prototype camera add-on board we’re developing for release later in the year, which will… … Continue reading →
Ruth and Shawn from YouTube channel Kids Invent Stuff picked a cool idea by 9-year-old Nathan, who drew a Foam-Firing Spy Camera, to recreate in real life. The trick with spy devices is to make sure they look as much like the object they’re hidden inside as possible. Where Raspberry Pi comes in is making… … Continue reading →
It’s become a tradition that we follow each Raspberry Pi model with a system-on-module variant based on the same core silicon. Raspberry Pi 1 gave rise to the original Compute Module in 2014; Raspberry Pi 3 and 3+ were followed by Compute Module 3 and 3+ in 2017 and 2019 respectively. Only Raspberry Pi 2,… … Continue reading →
When taking photos, most of us simply like to press the shutter button on our cameras and phones so that a viewable image is produced almost instantaneously, usually encoded in the well-known JPEG format. However, there are some applications where a little more control over the production of that JPEG is desirable. For instance, you… … Continue reading →
The past few months have given us ample opportunity to stare at the creatures that reside outside. In issue 33 of Hackspace Magazine, out today, Rosie Hattersley looks at ways to track them. It’s been a remarkable spring and early summer, and not just because many of us have had more time than usual to… … Continue reading →
Wow, DIY-Maxwell, wow. This reddit user got their hands on one of our new Raspberry Pi High Quality Cameras and decided to upgrade their homemade microscope with it. The brains of the thing are also provided by a Raspberry Pi. Key features Raspberry Pi OS 8 MegaPixel CMOS camera (Full HD 30 fps video) Imaging… … Continue reading →
Since we released the first Raspberry Pi camera module back in 2013, users have been clamouring for better access to the internals of the camera system, and even to be able to attach camera sensors of their own to the Raspberry Pi board. Today we’re releasing our first version of a new open source camera… … Continue reading →
To coincide with yesterday’s launch of the Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera, Raspberry Pi Press has created a new Official Camera Guide to help you get started and inspire your future projects. The Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera Connecting a High Quality Camera turns your Raspberry Pi into a powerful digital camera. This 132-page book… … Continue reading →
We’re pleased to announce a new member of the Raspberry Pi camera family: the 12.3-megapixel High Quality Camera, available today for just $50, alongside a range of interchangeable lenses starting at $25. NEW Raspberry Pi High Quality Camera 12.3 megapixel Sony IMX477 sensor, 7.9mm diagonal image size, and back-illuminated sensor architecture, with adjustable back focus… … Continue reading →
A Raspberry Pi Zero W, Pimoroni HyperPixel screen, and Raspberry Pi IR Camera Module are all you need to build this homemade night vision camera. How to build a night vision camera How to build a night vision camera, video showing the process and problems that I came across when building this camera Raspberry Pi night… … Continue reading →
Never let it be said that some makers won’t jump in at the deep end for their ambitious experiments with the Raspberry Pi. When Ievgenii Tkachenko fancied a challenge, he sought to go where few had gone before by creating an underwater drone, successfully producing a working prototype that he’s now hard at work refining.… … Continue reading →
Kids of the 1980s, rejoice: the age of the digital Etch-A-Sketch is now! What is an Etch-A-Sketch Introduced in 1960, the Etch-A-Sketch was invented by Frenchman André Cassagnes and manufactured by the Ohio Art Company. The back of the Etch-A-Sketch screen is covered in very fine aluminium powder. Turning one of the two directional knobs runs… … Continue reading →
Tired of opening the refrigerator only to find that your favourite snack is missing? Get video evidence of sneaky fridge thieves sent to your phone, with Adrian Rosebeck’s Raspberry Pi security camera project. Building a Raspberry Pi security camera with OpenCV Learn how to build a IoT + Raspberry Pi security camera using OpenCV and computer… … Continue reading →
Today we bring you the latest iteration of the Raspberry Pi Compute Module series: Compute Module 3+ (CM3+). This newest version of our flexible board for industrial applications offers over ten times the ARM performance, twice the RAM capacity, and up to eight times the Flash capacity of the original Compute Module. A long time… … Continue reading →
Warning: GIFs used in today’s blog contain flashing images. Students at the University of Bremen, Germany, have built a wearable camera that records the seconds of vision lost when you blink. Augenblick uses a Raspberry Pi Zero and Camera Module alongside muscle sensors to record footage whenever you close your eyes, producing a rather disjointed… … Continue reading →
Naturebytes are making their weatherproof Wildlife Cam Case available as a standalone product for the first time, a welcome addition to the Raspberry Pi ecosystem that should take some of the hassle out of your outdoor builds. Weatherproofing digital making projects People often use Raspberry Pis and Camera Modules for outdoor projects, but weatherproofing your… … Continue reading →
In this article from The MagPi issue 69, David Crookes explains how Daniel Berrangé took an old Kodak Brownie from the 1950s and turned it into a quirky digital camera. Get your copy of The MagPi magazine in stores now, or download it as a free PDF here. The Kodak Box Brownie When Kodak unveiled its Box Brownie in 1900,… … Continue reading →
Spring has sprung, and with it, sleepy-eyed wildlife is beginning to roam our gardens and local woodlands. So why not follow hackster.io maker reichley’s tutorial and build your own solar-powered squirrelhouse nature cam? Inspiration “I live half a mile above sea level and am SURROUNDED by animals…bears, foxes, turkeys, deer, squirrels, birds”, reichley explains in his tutorial.… … Continue reading →
Fred Fourie is building a low-cost underwater camera for shallow deployment, and his prototypes are already returning fascinating results. You can build your own PipeCam, and explore the undiscovered depths with a Raspberry Pi and off-the-shelf materials. Materials and build In its latest iteration, PipeCam consists of a 110mm PVC waste pipe with fittings and a… … Continue reading →
We’ve all been there: zombies at the door, Daleks on the driveway, creatures from the Upside Down in the walls. You want to be able to monitor their movements, but how do you do that without attracting their attention? Wesley Archer (AKA Raspberry Coulis) has the answer: a Pi-powered Night Vision Camera, perfect for catching… … Continue reading →
Abhishek Singh’s printing GIF camera uses two Raspberry Pis, the Model 3 and the Zero W, to take animated images and display them on an ejectable secondary screen. Instagif – A DIY Camera that prints GIFs instantly I built a camera that snaps a GIF and ejects a little cartridge so you can hold a… … Continue reading →
The ocular fundus is the interior surface of the eye, and an ophthalmologist can learn a lot about a patient’s health by examining it. However, there’s a problem: an ocular fundus camera can’t capture a useful image unless the eye is brightly lit, but this makes the pupil constrict, obstructing the camera’s view. Ophthalmologists use… … Continue reading →
When John Sichi discovered a Mansfield Holiday Zoom movie camera on Yerdle, he was instantly transported back to a childhood of making home movies with his family. The camera was fully operational, but sadly the lens was damaged.  With the cost of parts, film, and development an unreasonable expense, John decided to digitise the camera… … Continue reading →
When we launched Raspberry Pi Zero last November, it’s fair to say we were blindsided by the level of demand. We immediately sold every copy of MagPi issue 40 and every Zero in stock at our distributors; and every time a new batch of Zeros came through from the factory they’d sell out in minutes. To… … Continue reading →
Hello and welcome to Issue #150! This newsletter comes to you from Mountain View, California where I’m at Picademy USA with James, Matt and Courtney. We just opened applications for the next training which takes place in Baltimore in August. In case you missed it, we released a new camera module this week – the… … Continue reading →
The 5-megapixel visible-light camera board was our first official accessory back in 2013, and it remains one of your favourite add-ons. They’ve found their way into a bunch of fun projects, including telescopes, kites, science lessons and of course the Naturebytes camera trap. It was soon joined by the Pi NoIR infrared-sensitive version, which not… … Continue reading →
What if you used a Raspberry Pi and a Camera Module to breathe new life into an old 8mm film camera? That was the question on Claire Wright’s mind when she and her father set to work on modernizing an old motion picture camera that they found at a garage sale five years earlier. Inspired… … Continue reading →
Get started with the Raspberry Pi camera module, using Python and picamera. You’ll take still pictures, record video, and apply image effects. … Continue reading →
We’ve just spotted a third-party add-on for your Pi and Camera Board which we think you’ll find really useful.   The ribbon cable that comes with the Raspberry Pi Camera Module is, for reasons of signal integrity, not very long. In most cases, that doesn’t present a problem. But if you’re wanting to take pictures of something… … Continue reading →
Liz: We’ve got a number of good friends at Argon Design, a tech consultancy in Cambridge. (James Adams, our Director of Hardware, used to work there; as did my friend from the time of Noah, @eyebrowsofpower; the disgustingly clever Peter de Rivaz, who wrote Penguins Puzzle, is an Argon employee; and Steve Barlow, who heads Argon up,… … Continue reading →
Back in April we announced the Compute Module, and since then we’ve had a lot of interest from manufacturers who are looking to design the module into real products. We’ve already had orders for significant numbers of modules. It has taken a little while to spin up the wheels of mass production, but they are… … Continue reading →
Edited to add: Naturebytes’ website is now up and running at http://naturebytes.org/. You can sign up to their newsletter for updates. Start-up Naturebytes hopes their 3D printed Raspberry Pi camera trap (a camera triggered by the presence of animals) will be the beginning of a very special community of makers. Supported by the Raspberry Pi… … Continue reading →
We revealed the Raspberry Pi Compute Module back in April, and released the Compute Module Development Kit in the middle of June. Since then we’ve had a lot of interest and will shortly start shipping the Compute Module in volume to a variety of manufacturers who have already designed it into their products. One of… … Continue reading →
Fuelled by Welsh cakes and a lot of sunshine, the team at Sony Pencoed have finished building the first batch of Compute Modules (CM) and Compute Module IO Boards (CMIO). These are available today to buy from RS and Element14 in the form of Compute Module Development Kits. The MRP is $200. In each kit… … Continue reading →
One of our goals in launching the Raspberry Pi Compute Module was to provide people with a way to take products they’ve prototyped with the Raspberry Pi and bring them to market quickly and easily. We know that historically there have been a lot of people out there with great ideas for electronic products that… … Continue reading →
Pi NoIR, the infrared version of our camera board, is available to purchase for $25 plus tax from today. You’ll find it at all the usual suspects: RS Components, Premier Farnell and their subsidiaries; and at Adafruit. Other stores will be getting stock soon. What’s that mysterious square of stuff, you ask? I’ll let you… … Continue reading →
You may have heard rumours about something we’re calling Pi NoIR (Pi, no infrared) – it’s been a very badly kept secret. Some months ago we featured some work that was being done at Reading Hackspace, where members were removing the infrared filter to use the camera to sense infrared signals, and for low-light work,… … Continue reading →
Katherine Scott, newly equipped with a Raspberry Pi camera board, was looking for an image processing challenge. She realised she had an unused panoramic lens for an iPhone rolling around in a drawer somewhere at home, and got to work with the silly putty and cardboard to hook it up to the camera board. Since… … Continue reading →
The camera boards are now available for order! You can buy one from RS Components or from Premier Farnell/Element14. We’ve been very grateful for your patience as we’ve tweaked and refined things; it’d have been good to get the camera board out to you last month, but we wanted your experience to be as good… … Continue reading →
After a lot of swearing and arguing, we have managed to boil down nearly 700 entries to just ten winners. It was a very hard decision, and if you didn’t win please don’t feel too disheartened; we had some really exceptional entries for this competition and found it really hard to come to a final… … Continue reading →
Liz: here’s the second and final part of David Plowman’s walk through the development of the Raspberry Pi camera board, which will be available to purchase in April. Before you go ahead and read this, check out David’s first post. The Eye of the Beholder That’s where beauty lies, so the saying goes. And for… … Continue reading →
Liz: We’re very close to being able to release the $25 add-on camera board for the Raspberry Pi now. David Plowman has been doing a lot of the work on imaging and tuning. He’s very kindly agreed to write a couple of guest posts for us explaining some more for the uninitiated about the process… … Continue reading →
Maker Jen Fox took to hackster.io to share a Raspberry Pi–powered trash classifier that tells you whether the trash in your hand is recyclable, compostable, or just straight-up garbage. Jen reckons this project is beginner-friendly, as you don’t need any code to train the machine learning model, just a little to load it on Raspberry… … Continue reading →
Design Engineering student Ben Cobley has created a Raspberry Pi–powered sous-chef that automates the easier pan-cooking tasks so the head chef can focus on culinary creativity. Ben named his invention OnionBot, as the idea came to him when looking for an automated way to perfectly soften onions in a pan while he got on with… … Continue reading →
It’s been a long lockdown for one of our favourite makers, Pi & Chips. Like most of us (probably), they have turned their hand to training small animals that wander into their garden to pass the time — in this case, pigeons. I myself enjoy raising my glass to the squirrel that runs along my… … Continue reading →
You can now watch and share our recording of this week’s live stream coding session on YouTube.  This… … Continue reading →
Join us for Digital Making at Home: this week, young people can do stop motion and time-lapse animation with us! Through Digital Making at Home, we invite kids all over the world to code along with us and our new videos every week. So get your Raspberry Pi and Camera Module ready! We’re using them… … Continue reading →
Don’t blink or you’ll miss it! What do we mean by ‘it’ exactly? It’s EVERYTHING — the world… … Continue reading →
8 Bits and a Byte created this automatic bubble machine, which is powered and controlled by a Raspberry Pi and can be switched on via the internet by fans of robots and/or bubbles. They chose a froggy-shaped bubble machine, but you can repurpose whichever type you desire; it’s just easier to adapt a model running… … Continue reading →
Shot on a Raspberry Pi Camera Module, this stop-motion sequence is made up of 180 photos that took two hours to shoot and another hour to process. The trick lies in the Camera Module enabling you to change the alpha transparency of the overlay image, which is the previous frame. It’s all explained in the official… … Continue reading →
This week’s guest coder Sophie made a game about saving turtles with Mr C on our live stream.… … Continue reading →
If you find yourself working or learning, or simply socialising from home, Raspberry Pi can help with everything from collaborative productivity to video conferencing. Read more in issue #92 of The MagPi, out now. 01 Install the camera If you’re using a USB webcam, you can simply insert it into a USB port on Raspberry… … Continue reading →
Raspberry Pi 4 is more than powerful enough to serve as replacement desktop computer while you’re working from home. Or as a secondary desktop to help you out while you’re doing other things, such video conferencing, on your main computer. If you’re pulling your Raspberry Pi out of a drawer right now, you should make… … Continue reading →
The Edwards Lab at the University of Reading has developed a flexible, low-cost, open source lab robot for capturing images of microbiology samples with a Raspberry Pi camera module. It’s called POLIR, for Raspberry Pi camera Open-source Laboratory Imaging Robot. Here’s a timelapse video of them assembling it. Measuring antibiotic resistance with colour-changing dye The… … Continue reading →
Here’s our latest How to use video, showing you how to connect a button to your Raspberry Pi. HOW TO USE a BUTTON with Raspberry Pi Learn how to use a tactile button with your Raspberry Pi. They’re a great addition to any digital making project! Subscribe to our YouTube channel: http://rp… Connect a button… … Continue reading →
You really don’t need anything too fancy to build this Raspberry Pi laser scanner, and that’s why we think it’s pretty wonderful. Rasperry Pi 3D Laser Scanner Cornell University: ECE 5725 Michael Xiao and Thomas Scavella Building a Raspberry Pi laser scanner The ingredients you’ll need to build the laser scanner are: Raspberry Pi Raspberry… … Continue reading →
Keeping a modern cat entertained requires something more high-tech than a ball of yarn. The MagPi’s Phil King wonders if this is a purr-fect project… WARNING! LASER EYE! Don’t look into a laser beam, and don’t point a laser beam at a somebody’s head. For more on things you SHOULDN’T do with a laser, visit… … Continue reading →
Homes in Madrid, Dublin, Cardiff, Ljubljana, and Leuven are participating in the Citizens Observing UrbaN Transport (WeCount) project, a European Commission–funded research project investigating sustainable economic growth. 1,500 Raspberry Pi traffic sensors will be distributed to homes in the five cities to gather data on traffic conditions. Every hour, the devices will upload information to… … Continue reading →
If you own a 3D printer, you’ll likely have at least heard of OctoPrint, created by Gina Häußge and maintained by her and Guy Sheffer! OctoPrint has the potential to transform your 3D printing workflow for the better, and it’s very easy to set up. This guide will take you through the setup process step… … Continue reading →
Check out Super Make Something’s awesome NeoPixel LED mirror: a 576 RGB LED display that converts images via the Raspberry Pi Camera Module and Raspberry Pi 3B+ into a pixelated light show. Neopixel LED Mirror (Python, Raspberry Pi, Arduino, 3D Printing, Laser Cutting!) DIY How To Time to pull out all the stops for the… … Continue reading →
Last week, lots and lots of you shared your Raspberry Pi builds with us on social media using the hashtag #IUseMyRaspberryPiFor. Jay Wainwright from Liverpool noticed the conversation and got in touch to tell us about The Nest Box, which uses Raspberry Pi to bring impressively high-quality images and video from British bird boxes to… … Continue reading →
These Raspberry Pis take hourly photographs of snails in plastic container habitats, sharing them to the Snail Habitat website. Snails While some might find them kind of icky, I am in love with snails (less so with their homeless cousin, the slug), so this snail habitat project from Mrs Nation’s class is right up my… … Continue reading →
When we invited Estefannie Explains It All to present at Coolest Projects International, she decided to make something cool with a Raspberry Pi to bring along. But being Estefannie, she didn’t just make something a little bit cool. She went ahead and made Raspberry Pi Zero-powered Jurassic Park goggles, or, as she calls them, the… … Continue reading →
Plant scientists and agronomists use growth chambers to provide consistent growing conditions for the plants they study. This reduces confounding variables – inconsistent temperature or light levels, for example – that could render the results of their experiments less meaningful. To make sure that conditions really are consistent both within and between growth chambers, which… … Continue reading →
Low-cost open labware is a good thing in the world, and I was particularly pleased when micropalaeontologist Martin Tetard got in touch about the Raspberry Pi-based microscope he is developing. The project is called microscoPI (what else?), and it can capture, process, and store images and image analysis results. Martin is engaged in climate research:… … Continue reading →
We love ‘Raspberry Pi + space’ stuff. There, I’ve said it. No taksies backsies. From high-altitude balloon projects transporting Raspberry Pis to near space, to our two Astro Pi units living aboard the International Space Station, we simply can’t get enough. Seriously, if you’ve created anything space-related using a Raspberry Pi, please tell us! Capturing Earth… … Continue reading →
Let the accelerometer and gyroscope of your Raspberry Pi Sense HAT measure and record impact sustained in a car collision. Raspberry Pi Sense HAT The Raspberry Pi Sense HAT was originally designed for the European Astro Pi Challenge, inviting schoolchildren to code their own experiments for two Raspberry Pi units currently orbiting the Earth upon… … Continue reading →
Having just sat and watched this gorgeous time lapse of a Finnish lake, we thought it would be nice to finish off the working week with a collection of lovely Raspberry Pi Camera Module time lapses. Summer over a Finnish lake Summer time lapse over a Finnish lake. Time lapse over a Finnish lake from… … Continue reading →
In the 1993 action movie Demolition Man, Sylvester Stallone stars as a 1990s cop transported to the near-future. Technology plays a central role in the film, often bemusing the lead character. In a memorable scene, he is repeatedly punished by a ticketing machine for using bad language (a violation of the verbal morality statute). In… … Continue reading →
Use album artwork to trigger playback of your favourite music with Plynth, the Raspberry Pi–powered, camera-enhanced record stand. Plynth Demo This is “Plynth Demo” by Plynth on Vimeo, the home for high quality videos and the people who love them. Record playback with Plynth Plynth uses a Raspberry Pi and Pi Camera Module to identify… … Continue reading →
So this happened. And we are buzzing! You’re most likely aware of the Astro Pi Challenge. In case you’re not, it’s a wonderfully exciting programme organised by the European Space Agency (ESA) and us at Raspberry Pi. Astro Pi challenges European young people to write scientific experiments in code, and the best experiments run aboard… … Continue reading →
StereoPi allows users to attached two Camera Modules to their Raspberry Pi Compute Module — it’s a great tool for building stereoscopic cameras, 360º monitors, and virtual reality rigs. StereoPi draft 1 No Description My love for stereoscopic photography goes way back My great-uncle Eric was a keen stereoscopic photographer and member of The Stereoscopic Society.… … Continue reading →
Hi folks, Rob from The MagPi here! A few weeks ago, we asked you to vote on your top 50 favourite Raspberry Pi projects from the last two-or-so years. We had thousands of responses, but there was one clear winner…and you can find out who that was in issue 75 of The MagPi, out tomorrow… … Continue reading →
When Electrical Engineer Alan Platt was given the task of converting old cine film to digital footage for his father-in-law’s 70th birthday, his first instinct was to look online. “There are plenty of companies happy to convert old films”, he explains, “but they are all extremely expensive. In addition, you have to send your original… … Continue reading →
Does your camera giggle and smile as it takes your photo? Does your camera spit out your image from a thermal printer? No? Well, Sophy Wong’s SelfieBot does! Raspberry Pi SelfieBot: Selfie Camera with a Personality SelfieBot is a project Kim and I originally made for our booth at Seattle Mini Maker Faire 2017. Now,… … Continue reading →
Summer is coming to a close. The evenings grow darker. So pack away your flip flops, hang up your beach towel, and settle in for the colder months with these fun 3D-printable projects to make at home or in your local makerspace. Fallout 4 desktop terminal Power Up Props’ replica of the Fallout desktop terminals… … Continue reading →
While at World Maker Faire New York last weekend, I found myself chatting to a rather lovely gentleman by the name of Mac Pierce. During our conversation, Mac mentioned a project he’d worked on called As We Are, an interactive art installation located in the Greater Columbus Convention Center in Columbus, Ohio. “So it’s this 14-foot… … Continue reading →
This article from The MagPi issue 74 highlights the use of the Raspberry Pi Zero to build a marine camera for coral exploration. Get your copy of The MagPi in stores now, or download it as a free PDF here. Ecologists in Germany are deploying camera-equipped Pi Zero Ws off the coast of Norway to discover more about coral… … Continue reading →
Tired of saying goodbye? Show people how you really feel with 8 Bits and a Byte‘s Goodbye Machine. Spoiler alert: no one wants to be at the receiving end of the red button. The Goodbye Machine: automate your goodbyes The Goodbye Machine, a machine to automate goodbyes using a Raspberry Pi, two servo’s, two massive buttons… … Continue reading →
Use a Raspberry Pi and a Pi Camera Module to build your own machine learning–powered rock paper scissors game! Rock-Paper-Scissors game using computer vision and machine learning on Raspberry Pi A Rock-Paper-Scissors game using computer vision and machine learning on the Raspberry Pi. Project GitHub page: https://github.com/DrGFreeman/rps-cv PROJECT ORIGIN: This project results from a challenge my… … Continue reading →
The end of the academic year is here, and we are marking the occasion by celebrating teachers from all over the world. Since last September, we’ve run a whole host of programmes that teachers have been involved in. From training with us at Picademy to building apocalyptic projects for Pioneers, from running Code Clubs, Dojos,… … Continue reading →
Rumour has it that there’s a worldwide football tournament on, and that England, surprisingly, are doing quite well. In celebration, here are some soccer-themed Raspberry Pi projects for you to try out at home between (or during) matches. FutureLearn Football Uploaded by Raspberry Pi on 2018-07-09. Beat the goalie Score as many goals as you… … Continue reading →
Take a selfie, wait for the image to appear, and behold a cartoon version of yourself. Or, at least, behold a cartoon version of whatever the camera thought it saw. Welcome to Draw This by maker Dan Macnish. Dan has made code, instructions, and wiring diagrams available to help you bring this beguiling weirdery into… … Continue reading →
This week, the ten winning Astro Pi Mission Space Lab teams got to take part in a video conference with ESA Astronaut Tim Peake! ESA Astro Pi students meet Tim Peake Uploaded by Raspberry Pi on 2018-06-26. A brief history of Astro Pi In 2014, Raspberry Pi Foundation partnered with the UK Space Agency and… … Continue reading →
Michael Portera‘s trading card scanner uses LEGO, servo motors, and a Raspberry Pi and Camera Module to scan Magic: The Gathering cards and look up their prices online. This is a neat and easy-to-recreate project that you can adapt for whatever your, or your younger self’s, favourite trading cards are. MTG Card Organizer II Uploaded… … Continue reading →
Hello everyone, This week, issue 5 of Hello World is out, and Astro Pi Mission Space Lab data is in! Check out the Astro Pi Twitter feed for wonderful images of Earth from space, captured by code written by students and run on Raspberry Pis on the International Space Station. We also discovered Brian Mix’s… … Continue reading →
Squeal with delight as your inner Pokémon trainer witnesses the wonder of Adrian Rosebrock’s deep learning Pokédex. Creating a real-life Pokedex with a Raspberry Pi, Python, and Deep Learning This video demos a real-like Pokedex, complete with visual recognition, that I created using a Raspberry Pi, Python, and Deep Learning. You can find the entire… … Continue reading →
After the outstanding success of their AIY Projects Voice and Vision Kits, Google has announced the release of upgraded kits, complete with Raspberry Pi Zero WH, Camera Module, and preloaded SD card. Google’s AIY Projects Kits Google launched the AIY Projects Voice Kit last year, first as a cover gift with The MagPi magazine and… … Continue reading →
For those moments when you wish the cast of Disney’s Beauty and the Beast was real, only to realise what a nightmare that would be, here’s Paul-Louis Ageneau’s robotic teapot! Tale as old as time… It’s the classic story of guy meets digital killer teapot, digital killer teapot inspires him to 3D print his own.… … Continue reading →
Before our beloved SpaceDave left the Raspberry Pi Foundation to join the ranks of the European Space Agency (ESA) — and no, we’re still not jealous *ahem* — he kindly drafted us one final blog post about the Astro Pi upgrades heading to the International Space Station today! So here it is. Enjoy! We are… … Continue reading →
The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed that today is 28 February, which is as close as you’re going to get to our sixth birthday, given that we launched on a leap day. For the last three years, we’ve launched products on or around our birthday: Raspberry Pi 2 in 2015; Raspberry Pi 3 in… … Continue reading →
Get on board with facial recognition and clock your screen time with facepunch, the facial recognition punch clock from dekuNukem. How it works dekuNukem uses a Raspberry Pi 3, the Raspberry Pi camera module, and an OLED screen for the build. You don’t strictly need to include the OLED board, but it definitely adds to… … Continue reading →
Bob Herzberg, BMO builder and blogger at BYOBMO.com, fills us in on the whys and hows and even the Pen Wards of creating interactive Adventure Time BMO props with the Raspberry Pi. A Conversation With BMO A conversation with BMO showing off some voice recognition capabilities. There is no interaction for BMO’s responses other than voice… … Continue reading →