Today we’ve released another update to the Raspbian desktop. In addition to the usual small tweaks and bug fixes, the big new changes are the inclusion of an offline version of Scratch 2.0, and of Thonny (a user-friendly IDE for Python which is excellent for beginners). We’ll look at all the changes in this post, but … Continue reading →
We’ve got some great news to share today: the Raspberry Pi Foundation is joining forces with the CoderDojo Foundation, in a merger that will give many more young people all over the world new opportunities to learn how to be creative with technology. CoderDojo is a global network of coding clubs for kids from seven to 17. The … Continue reading →
At primary school, I loved my Tamagotchi: it moved, it beeped, it was almost like I could talk to it! Nowadays, kids can actually have conversations with their toys, and some toys are IoT devices, capable of accessing online services or of interacting with people via the Internet. And so to one of this week’s … Continue reading →
OpenEnergyMonitor, who make open-source tools for energy monitoring, have been using Raspberry Pi since we launched in 2012. Like Raspberry Pi, they manufacture their hardware in Wales and send it to people all over the world. We invited co-founder Glyn Hudson to tell us why they do what they do, and how Raspberry Pi helps. … Continue reading →
It’s Easter Monday, a public holiday here in the UK, and Pi Towers is still and silent. Even the continuous flight augering piler on the massive building site next door is, for a time, quiet. So here is the briefest of posts, to share with you a Raspberry Pi cam live-streaming from a blue tit … Continue reading →
The ocular fundus is the interior surface of the eye, and an ophthalmologist can learn a lot about a patient’s health by examining it. However, there’s a problem: an ocular fundus camera can’t capture a useful image unless the eye is brightly lit, but this makes the pupil constrict, obstructing the camera’s view. Ophthalmologists use … Continue reading →
London-based Solid State Group decided to combine Slack with a giant LED wall, and created a thing of beauty for their office. Flexing the brain Project name RIO: Rendered-Input-Output took its inspiration from Google Creative Lab’s anypixel.js project. An open source software and hardware library, anypixel.js boasts the ability to ‘create big, unusual, interactive displays … Continue reading →
Have you ever fancied building a Raspberry Pi photo booth? How about one with Snapchat-esque overlay filters? What if it tweeted your images to its own Twitter account for all to see? The All-Seeing Pi on Twitter The All Seeing Pi has seen you visiting @Raspberry_Pi Party @missphilbin #PiParty Introducing The All-Seeing Pi “Well, the thing … Continue reading →
Walk around the commons of Cambridge and you’re bound to see one or more of the Cambridge University Quidditch Club players mounted upon sticks with a makeshift quaffle. But try as they might, their broomsticks will never send them soaring through the air. The same faux-wizardry charge can’t be levelled at Allen Pan‘s Real-Life Wizard Duel. … Continue reading →
Here at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, we take great pride in the wonderful free resources we produce for you to use in classes, at home and in coding clubs. We publish them under a Creative Commons licence, and they’re an excellent way to develop your digital-making skills. With yesterday being World Poetry Day (I’m a … Continue reading →