Tag:
retro games
Unparalleled depth in a 2D game: PyGame Zero extraordinaire Daniel Pope shows you how to recreate a zooming starfield effect straight out of the eighties arcade classic Gyruss. The crowded, noisy realm of eighties amusement arcades presented something of a challenge for developers of the time: how can you make your game stand out from … Continue reading →
Rik Cross, Senior Learning Manager here at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, shows you how to recreate the deadly explosions in the classic game, Bomberman. Creating Bomberman Bomberman was first released in the early 1980s as a tech demo for a BASIC compiler, but soon became a popular series that’s still going today. Bomberman sees players use … Continue reading →
Atari’s Breakout was one of the earliest video game blockbusters. Here’s how to recreate it in Python. Atari Breakout The games industry owes a lot to the humble bat and ball. Designed by Allan Alcorn in 1972, Pong was a simplified version of table tennis, where the player moved a bat and scored points by … Continue reading →
Rik Cross, Senior Learning Manager here at Raspberry Pi, shows you how to recreate the spawning of objects found in the balloon-bursting arcade gem Pang. Capcom’s Pang Programmed by Mitchell and distributed by Capcom, Pang was first released as an arcade game in 1989, but was later ported to a whole host of home computers, … Continue reading →
They add strategy to a genre-defining shooter. Andrew Gillett lifts the lid on Space Invaders’ disintegrating shields. Released in 1978, Space Invaders introduced ideas so fundamental to video games that it’s hard to imagine a time before them. And it did this using custom-made hardware which by today’s standards is unimaginably slow. Space Invaders ran … Continue reading →
When Ben North was faced with the dilemma of his nine-year-old son wanting him to watch his pinball games while, at the same time, Ben should be doing housework, he came up with a brilliant hack. Ben decided to investigate the inner workings of his twenty-year-old Twilight Zone pinball machine to convert its score display … Continue reading →
If you’ve yet to hear about RetroPie, how’s it going living under that rock? RetroPie, for the few who are unfamiliar, allows users to play retro video games on their Raspberry Pi or PC. From Alex Kidd to Ecco the Dolphin, Streets of Rage 2 to Cool Spot, nostalgia junkies can get their fill by flashing … Continue reading →
The Raspberry Pi computer was inspired by the machines of the 80s, which were used interchangeably for programming and gaming. In fact, many of you will remember typing in the pages of code from a magazine to make a game. Some people used them as a basis on which to build their own games, taking the early steps … Continue reading →
When someone mailed me a link to this performance, I assumed it was going to be one of those setups where two pianists play jolly tunes together in a bar. How wrong I was. These two pianists (Alvise Sinivia and Léo Jassef from the Conservatoire National de Paris) are trying to kill each other in … Continue reading →
People have been emulating classic computers and games consoles on Raspberry Pi since we launched back in 2012. For those of us who bough our first hardware in the 1980s, this is a fun way to take a trip down memory lane, but our relatively modest CPU performance restricted us to third– and fourth-generation platforms. Anything with … Continue reading →