Tag:
retro games
Learn how to create your own obedient lemmings that follow any path put in front of them. Raspberry Pi’s own Rik Cross explains how. Lemmings Lemmings is a puzzle-platformer, created at DMA Design, and first became available for the Amiga in 1991. The aim is to guide a number of small lemming sprites to safety, … Continue reading →
Learn how to create game objects that follow the path of the main player sprite. Raspberry Pi’s own Rik Cross explains all. Gradius First released by Konami in 1985, Gradius pushed the boundaries of the shoot-’em-up genre with its varied level design, dramatic boss fights, and innovative power-up system. One of the most memorable of … Continue reading →
Isometric graphics give 2D games the illusion of depth. Mark Vanstone explains how to make an isometric game map of your own. Isometric projection Most early arcade games were 2D, but in 1982, a new dimension emerged: isometric projection. The first isometric game to hit arcades was Sega’s pseudo-3D shooter, Zaxxon. The eye-catching format soon … Continue reading →
Effective animation gave Donkey Kong barrels of personality. Raspberry Pi’s own Rik Cross explains how to create a similar walk cycle. Donkey Kong wasn’t the first game to feature an animated character who could walk and jump, but on its release in 1981, it certainly had more personality than the games that came before it. … Continue reading →
Unparalleled depth in a 2D game: PyGame Zero extraordinaire Daniel Pope shows you how to recreate a zooming starfield effect straight out of the eighties arcade classic Gyruss. The crowded, noisy realm of eighties amusement arcades presented something of a challenge for developers of the time: how can you make your game stand out from … Continue reading →
Rik Cross, Senior Learning Manager here at the Raspberry Pi Foundation, shows you how to recreate the deadly explosions in the classic game, Bomberman. Creating Bomberman Bomberman was first released in the early 1980s as a tech demo for a BASIC compiler, but soon became a popular series that’s still going today. Bomberman sees players use … Continue reading →
Atari’s Breakout was one of the earliest video game blockbusters. Here’s how to recreate it in Python. Atari Breakout The games industry owes a lot to the humble bat and ball. Designed by Allan Alcorn in 1972, Pong was a simplified version of table tennis, where the player moved a bat and scored points by … Continue reading →
Rik Cross, Senior Learning Manager here at Raspberry Pi, shows you how to recreate the spawning of objects found in the balloon-bursting arcade gem Pang. Capcom’s Pang Programmed by Mitchell and distributed by Capcom, Pang was first released as an arcade game in 1989, but was later ported to a whole host of home computers, … Continue reading →
They add strategy to a genre-defining shooter. Andrew Gillett lifts the lid on Space Invaders’ disintegrating shields. Released in 1978, Space Invaders introduced ideas so fundamental to video games that it’s hard to imagine a time before them. And it did this using custom-made hardware which by today’s standards is unimaginably slow. Space Invaders ran … Continue reading →
When Ben North was faced with the dilemma of his nine-year-old son wanting him to watch his pinball games while, at the same time, Ben should be doing housework, he came up with a brilliant hack. Ben decided to investigate the inner workings of his twenty-year-old Twilight Zone pinball machine to convert its score display … Continue reading →