Tag:
music hacks
Is it a guitar that’s also a Game Boy, or a Game Boy that’s also a guitar? We just don’t know. This is a thing of beauty. Best of all, for me, is the way the A and B buttons don’t just control the Game Boy; they’re also volume and tone dials. The build uses … Continue reading →
Music hacks are my favourite hacks of all, and this one had me bounding around the office with the video below playing on my laptop so I could share it with people yesterday. Meet Quaver, the multiplayer piano. With a Raspberry Pi, some magnetic pickups, and the open-source Sooper Looper (which I am downloading as soon … Continue reading →
Now, I often reflect to myself smugly that Pi Towers is a really cool place to work. We’ve got an arcade machine, a fake hamster (Emma has forbidden all pets of the higher orders) in a real cage, brine shrimp (Emma’s OK with those), a Portal Turret, Pac-Man dress-up gear, juggling clubs, about fifty Rubik’s cubes, Biscuits … Continue reading →
Massive thanks to Clive for babysitting this blog (he’s been both writing and editing) while I was away. Any relaxation I was still feeling from the vacation evaporated the moment I saw my inbox. It was good while it lasted. Regular readers will know that my favourite Raspberry Pi projects are often the musical ones. So I was … Continue reading →
We received an email a little while back from Christian Schwöbel in Germany. He’d found one of our blog posts from a couple of years back, about a guitar effects unit, and thought we might be interested in his project too. It’s a light organ built into a guitar pedalboard, with LPD8806 strips to provide … Continue reading →
When someone mailed me a link to this performance, I assumed it was going to be one of those setups where two pianists play jolly tunes together in a bar. How wrong I was. These two pianists (Alvise Sinivia and Léo Jassef from the Conservatoire National de Paris) are trying to kill each other in … Continue reading →
To celebrate the launch of Sonic Pi 2 we held the inaugural Sonic Pi competition. We were looking for some of the best space-themed music, coded with Sonic Pi v2.0 on a Raspberry Pi by school children in the UK aged between 7-16 years – and we were not disappointed. After a month of judging, Dr Sam … Continue reading →
At a Princeton hackathon a while back, Bonnie Eisenman did something rather wonderful to a flight of stairs using a Raspberry Pi, some lights, an Arduino and a handful of photoresistors. Bonnie, I can’t believe you only won second prize. This is amazing. A while later, Bonnie made build instructions and code available on Instructables – and since … Continue reading →
What do you get if you cross a Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), a Guitar Hero Controller, a Famicom Controller, a Raspberry Pi and a toy keyboard? What you actually get is this: a homemade keytar which uses the NES’s lovely grungy old 8-bit analogue sound chip to make sweet, sweet synthesised tunes. Theremin Hero has built the keytar … Continue reading →
What do you get if you cross a Raspberry Pi; 57 geometrically tiled, thumb-sized joysticks; a spot of multiplexing; and some Bach? A completely new musical instrument, that’s what. David Sharples says: We wanted to invent an entirely new electronic musical instrument, and there were two things we wanted to focus on in the design of … Continue reading →