Tag:
science
If you’re a subscriber to HackSpace magazine you’ll already know all about issue 10. For the rest of you who’ve yet to subscribe, issue 10 is out today! Build a drone Ever since Icarus flew too close to the sun, man has dreamed of flight. Thanks to brushless motors, cheaper batteries than ever before, and … Continue reading →
Arduino is officially brilliant. It’s the perfect companion for your Raspberry Pi, opening up new possibilities for robotics, drones and all sorts of physical computing projects. In HackSpace magazine issue 8  we’re taking a look at what’s going on on planet Arduino, and how it can make our world better. This little board and its … Continue reading →
Did you realise the Sense HAT has been available for over two years now? Used by astronauts on the International Space Station, the exact same hardware is available to you on Earth. With a new Astro Pi challenge just launched, it’s time for a retrospective/roundup/inspiration post about this marvellous bit of kit. The Sense HAT … Continue reading →
Physics! Particles! Statistical modelling! Quantum theory! How can non-scientists understand any of it? Well, students from Durham University are here to help you wrap your head around it all – and to our delight, they’re using the power of the Raspberry Pi to do it! At the Royal Society’s Summer Science Exhibition, taking place in London … Continue reading →
In collaboration with Professor Frank Kelly and the environmental scientists of King’s College London, artist Kasia Molga has created Human Sensor – a collection of hi-tech costumes that react to air pollution within the wearer’s environment. Commissioned by Invisible Dust, an organisation supporting artists and scientists to create pieces that explore environmental and climate change, Molga took … Continue reading →
Now that British ESA Astronaut Tim Peake is back on the ground it’s time for the final Astro Pi mission update: the summary of the experiment results from the International Space Station (ISS). We’ve been holding this back to give the winners some time to publish the results of their experiments themselves. Back in 2015 … Continue reading →
A group of people from CERN is using their spare time to build Cosmic Pi, a cosmic ray detector based on a Raspberry Pi. Their goal is to crowdsource the world’s largest cosmic ray telescope by getting the devices into the hands of people and organisations around the globe, collecting data that will help astrophysicists … Continue reading →
Altitude Technology have a very interesting Kickstarter campaign that’s just entering its final few days. It’s for an Internet of Things air quality monitoring device called Sensly, and one of the interesting things about it is that it’s available either as a consumer unit or, considerably more cheaply, as a Raspberry Pi HAT. Sensly will … Continue reading →
Before we get down to it today, a quick notice: Matt Timmons-Brown, freshly released from GCSE exam hell, will be dropping in to do some video interviews for his Raspberry Pi Guy YouTube channel next week. Do you have any questions you’d like him to put to Eben? Let us know in the comments. Steve … Continue reading →
Cetacean species, including whales, dolphins and porpoises, are considered indicators of the health of marine ecosystems around the world. While a number are known to be endangered, a lack of data means that the population size and conservation status of many species are impossible to estimate. These animals are vulnerable to the effects of human … Continue reading →