Tag:
accessibility
ChordAssist aims to bring the joy of learning the guitar to those who otherwise may have problems with accessing guitar tutorials. Offering advice in Braille, in speech, and on-screen, ChordAssist has been built specifically for deaf, blind, and mute people. Creator Joe Birch, who also built the BrailleBox device, used Raspberry Pi, Google Assistant, and … Continue reading →
A Raspberry Pi is the beating heart of this accessible musical instrument, built by South Korean maker Jaewon “J. One” Choi to enable more people with hearing impairments to create music: synesthiser. experimental musical instrument, 2018 Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Pure Data, Python Making music more accessible J. One’s latest project, synesthiser, produces vibration alongside sound, … Continue reading →
To aid his mother in reading the labels of her groceries, Russell Grokett linked a laser barcode reader to a Raspberry Pi Zero W to read out the names of scanned item. RASPBERRY PI TALKING BARCODE READER My mom is unable to read labels on grocery items anymore, so I went looking for solutions. After … Continue reading →
With OTON GLASS, users are able to capture text with a blink and have it read back to them in their chosen language. It’s wonderful tool for people with dyslexia or poor vision, or for travellers abroad. OTON GLASS A wearable device for people who have difficulty reading. OTON GLASS Inspired by his father’s dyslexia, Keisuke … Continue reading →
The Tough Pi-ano needs to live up to its name as a rugged, resilient instrument for a very good reason: kids. Brian ’24 Hour Engineer’ McEvoy made the Tough Pi-ano as a gift to his aunt and uncle, for use in their centre for children with learning and developmental disabilities such as autism and Down’s syndrome. This … Continue reading →
Once in a while you come across a project that you can’t help but share. One that exemplifies the way people across the globe are using Raspberry Pi to make a difference in ways we didn’t quite anticipate. HolaMundo is one of those projects. They’re using Raspberry Pis for the training they describe (click CC … Continue reading →
Liz: We’ve had some really interesting conversations this year with visually impaired users of the Raspberry Pi. Accessibility on the Pi is something the community’s been working on since we launched; Michael Ray started a Raspberry-vi (vi stands for visually impaired) mailing list which has been running for a while now, and the group behind … Continue reading →