Raspberry Pi Blog

This is the official Raspberry Pi blog for news and updates from the Raspberry Pi Foundation, education initiatives, community projects and more!

Moonhack 2017: a new world record!

With the incredible success of this year’s Moonhack under their belt, here’s Code Club Australia‘s Kelly Tagalan with a lowdown on the event, and why challenges such as these are so important.

On 15 August 2017, Code Clubs around the globe set a world record for the most kids coding in a day! From Madrid to Manila and from Sydney to Seoul, kids in Code Clubs, homes, and community centres around the world used code in order to ‘hack the moon’.

Moonhack 2017 Recap: WORLDWIDE CODING

We set a world record of the most kids coding at the same time not only across Australia….but across the WORLD! Watch our recap of our day hackathon of kids coding across the globe.

The Moonhack movement

The first Moonhack took place in Sydney in 2016, where we set a record of 10207 kids coding in a day.

Images of children taking part in Code Club Australia's Moonhack 2017

The response to Moonhack, not just in Australia but around the world, blew us away, and this year we decided to make the challenge as global as possible.

“I want to create anything that can benefit the life of one person, hundreds of people, or maybe even thousands.” – Moonhack Code Club kid, Australia.

The Code Club New Zealand team helped to create and execute projects with help from Code Club in the UK, and Code Club Canada, France, South Korea, Bangladesh, and Croatia created translated materials to allow even more kids to take part.

Moonhack 2017

The children had 24 hours to try coding a specially made Moonhack project using Python, Scratch or Scratch Jr. Creative Moonhackers even made their own custom projects, and we saw amazing submissions on a range of themes, from moon football to heroic dogs saving our natural satellite from alien invaders!

Images of children taking part in Code Club Australia's Moonhack 2017

In the end, 28575 kids from 56 countries and from 600 Code Clubs took part in Moonhack to set a new record. Record Setter founder and Senior Adjudicator, Corey Henderson, travelled to Sydney to Moonhack Mission Control to verify the record, and we were thrilled to hear that we came close to tripling the number of kids who took part last year!

The top five Moonhack contributing countries were Australia, New Zealand, the USA, the UK, and Croatia, but we saw contributions from so many more amazing places, including Syria and Guatemala. The event was a truly international Code Club collaboration!

Images of children taking part in Code Club Australia's Moonhack 2017

The founder of Code Club Bangladesh, Shajan Miah, summed up the spirit of Moonhack well: “Moonhack was a great opportunity for children in Bangladesh to take part in a global event. It connected the children with like-minded people across the world, and this motivated them to want to continue learning coding and programming. They really enjoyed the challenge!”

Images of children taking part in Code Club Australia's Moonhack 2017

Of course, the most important thing about Moonhack was that the kids had fun taking part and experienced what it feels like to create with code. One astute nine-year-old told us, “What I love about coding is that you can create your own games. Coding is becoming more important in the work environment and I want to understand it and write it.”

This is why we Moonhack: to get kids excited about coding, and to bring them into the global Code Club community. We hope that every Moonhacker who isn’t yet part of a Code Club will decide to join one soon, and that their experience will help guide them towards a future involving digital making. Here’s to Moonhack 2018!

Join Code Club

With new school terms starting and new clubs forming, there’s never been a better time to volunteer for a Code Club! With the official extension of the Code Club age range from 9-11 to 9-13, there are even more opportunities to get involved.

The Code Club logo with added robots - Moonhack 2017

If you’re ready to volunteer and are looking for a club to join, head to the Code Club International website to find your local network. There you’ll also find information on starting a new club from scratch, anywhere in the world, and you can read all about making your venue, such as a library, youth club, or office, available as a space for a Code Club.

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Pioneers Summer Camp 2017

In July, winners of the first two Pioneers challenges came together at Google HQ at Kings Cross in London for the Pioneers Summer Camp. This event was a special day to celebrate their awesomeness, and to give them access to some really cool stuff.

Pioneers: Google Summer Camp 2017

In July this year, winners of the first two Pioneers challenges came to Google HQ in London’s Kings Cross to meet, make and have an awesome time.

The lucky Pioneers

The summer camp was organised specifically for the winners of the two Pioneers challenges Make us laugh and Make it outdoors. Invitations went out to every team that won an award, including the Theme winners, winners in categories such as Best Explanation or Inspiring Journey, and those teams that received a Judges’ Recognition. We also allowed their mentors to attend, because they earned it too.

Code Club Scotland on Twitter

Excited about @Raspberry_Pi Pioneers day at @Google today with @jm_paterson and The Frontier Team #makeyourideas https://t.co/wZqfqqgZuL

With teams of excited Pioneers arriving from all over the UK, the day was bound to be a great success and a fun experience for all.

The Pioneers Summer Camp

The event took place at the rather impressive Google HQ in King’s Cross, London. Given that YouTube Space London is attached to this building, everyone, including the mentors and the Raspberry Pi team, was immediately eager to explore.

YouTube Space London

image c/o IBT

In rooms designed around David-Bowie-associated themes, e.g. Major Tom and Aladdin Sane, our intrepid Pioneers spent the morning building robots and using the Google AIY Projects kit to control their builds. Every attendee got to keep their robot and AIY kits, to be able to continue their tech experiments at home. They also each received their own Raspberry Pi, as well as some Google goodies and a one-of-a-kind Raspberry Pi hoody…much to the jealousy of many of our Twitter followers.

Meanwhile, mentors were invited to play with their own AIY kits, and the team from pi-top took accompanying parents aside to introduce them to the world of Scratch. This in itself was wonderful to witness: nervous parents started the day anxiously prodding at their pi-top screens, and they ended it with a new understanding of why code and digital making makes their kids tick.

Raspberry Pi Pioneers Summer Camp 2017

After the making funtimes, the Pioneers got to learn about career opportunities within the field of digital making from some of the best in the industry. Representatives from Google, YouTube, and the Shell Scholarship Fund offered insights into their day-to-day work and some of their teams’ cool projects.

And to top off the day, our Pioneers winners went on a tour of the YouTube studios, a space to which only YouTube Creators have access. Lucky bunch!

The evening

When the evening rolled around, Pioneers got to work setting up their winning projects. From singing potatoes to sun-powered instruments and builds for plant maintenance, the array of ideas and creations showcased the incredible imagination these young makers have displayed throughout the first two seasons of Pioneers.

As well as a time for showing off winning makes, the evening was also an opportunity for Pioneers, mentors, and parents to mingle, chat, swap Twitter usernames, and get to know others as interested in making and changing the world as they are.

Raspberry Pi Pioneers Summer Camp 2017

The Pioneers Summer Camp came to a close with a great Q&A by some eager Pioneers, followed by praise from Raspberry Pi Foundation CEO Philip Colligan, Mike Warriner of Google UK, and Make it outdoors judge Georgina Asmah from the Shell Centenary Scholarship Fund.

Become a Pioneer

We’ll be announcing the next Pioneers challenge on Monday 18 September, and we’re so excited to see what our makers do with the next theme. We’ve put a lot of brain power into coming up with the ultimate challenge, and it’s taking everything we have not to let it slip!

Well, maybe I can just…don’t tell anyone, but here’s a sneek peak at part of the logo. Shhhh…

One thing we can tell you: this season of Pioneers will include makers from the Republic of Ireland, thanks in part to the incredible support from our team at CoderDojo. Woohoo!

We’ll announce the challenge via the Raspberry Pi blog, but make sure to sign up for the Pioneers newsletter to get all the latest information directly to your inbox.

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The Weather Station and the eclipse

As everyone knows, one of the problems with the weather is that it can be difficult to predict a long time in advance. In the UK we’ve had stormy conditions for weeks but, of course, now that I’ve finished my lightning detector, everything has calmed down. If you’re planning to make scientific measurements of a particular phenomenon, patience is often required.

Oracle Weather Station

Wake STEM ECH get ready to safely observe the eclipse

In the path of the eclipse

Fortunately, this wasn’t a problem for Mr Burgess and his students at Wake STEM Early College High School in Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. They knew exactly when the event they were interested in studying was going to occur: they were going to use their Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station to monitor the progress of the 2017 solar eclipse.

Wake STEM EC HS on Twitter

Through the @Celestron telescope #Eclipse2017 @WCPSS via @stemburgess

Measuring the temperature drop

The Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Stations are always active and recording data, so all the students needed to do was check that everything was connected and working. That left them free to enjoy the eclipse, and take some amazing pictures like the one above.

You can see from the data how the changes in temperature lag behind the solar events – this makes sense, as it takes a while for the air to cool down. When the sun starts to return, the temperature rise continues on its pre-eclipse trajectory.

Oracle Weather Station

Weather station data 21st Aug: the yellow bars mark the start and end of the eclipse, the red bar marks the maximum sun coverage.

Reading Mr Burgess’ description, I’m feeling rather jealous. Being in the path of the Eclipse sounds amazing: “In North Carolina we experienced 93% coverage, so a lot of sunlight was still shining, but the landscape took on an eerie look. And there was a cool wind like you’d experience at dusk, not at 2:30 pm on a hot summer day. I was amazed at the significant drop in temperature that occurred in a small time frame.”

Temperature drop during Eclipse Oracle Weather Station.

Close up of data showing temperature drop as recorded by the Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station. The yellow bars mark the start and end of the eclipse, the red bar marks the maximum sun coverage.

 Weather Station in the classroom

I’ve been preparing for the solar eclipse for almost two years, with the weather station arriving early last school year. I did not think about temperature data until I read about citizen scientists on a NASA website,” explains Mr Burgess, who is now in his second year of working with the Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station. Around 120 ninth-grade students (ages 14-15) have been involved with the project so far. “I’ve found that students who don’t have a strong interest in meteorology find it interesting to look at real data and figure out trends.”

Wake STEM EC Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station installation

Wake STEM EC Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station installation

As many schools have discovered, Mr Burgess found that the biggest challenge with the Weather Station project “was finding a suitable place to install the weather station in a place that could get power and Ethernet“. To help with this problem, we’ve recently added two new guides to help with installing the wind sensors outside and using WiFi to connect the kit to the Internet.

Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station

If you want to keep up to date with all the latest Raspberry Pi Oracle Weather Station activities undertaken by our network of schools around the world, make sure you regularly check our weather station forum. Meanwhile, everyone at Wake STEM ECH is already starting to plan for their next eclipse on Monday, April 8, 2024. I wonder if they’d like some help with their Weather Station?

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Make your own game with CoderDojo’s new book

The first official CoderDojo book, CoderDojo Nano: Build Your Own Website, was a resounding success: thousands of copies have been bought by aspiring CoderDojo Ninjas, and it‘s available in ten languages, including Bulgarian, Czech, Dutch, Lithuanian, Latvian, Portuguese, Spanish, and Slovakian. Now we are delighted to announce the release of the second book in our Create with Code trilogy, titled CoderDojo Nano: Make Your Own Game.

Cover of CoderDojo Nano Make your own game

The paperback book will be available in English from Thursday 7 September (with English flexibound and Dutch versions scheduled to follow in the coming months), enabling young people and adults to learn creative and fun coding skills!

What will you learn?

The new book explains the fundamentals of the JavaScript language in a clear, logical way while supporting you to create your very own computer game.

Pixel image of laptop displaying a jump-and-run game

You will learn how to animate characters, create a world for your game, and use the physics of movement within it. The book is full of clear step-by-step instructions and illustrated screenshots to make reviewing your code easy. Additionally, challenges and open-ended prompts at the end of each section will encourage you to get creative while making your game.

This book is the perfect first step towards understanding game development, particularly for those of you who do not (yet) have a local Dojo. Regardless of where you live, using our books you too can learn to ‘Create with Code’!

Tried and tested

As always, CoderDojo Ninjas from all around the world tested our book, and their reactions have been hugely positive. Here is a selection of their thoughts:

“The book is brilliant. The [game] is simple yet innovative. I personally love it, and want to get stuck in making it right away!”

“What I really like is that, unlike most books on coding, this one properly explains what’s happening, and what each piece of code does and where it comes from.”

“I found the book most enjoyable. The layout is great, with lots of colour, and I found the information very easy to follow. The Ninja Tips are a great help in case you get a bit stuck. I liked that the book represents a mix of boy and girl Ninjas — it really makes coding fun for all.”

“The book is a great guide for both beginners and people who want to do something creative with their knowledge of code. Even people who cannot go to a CoderDojo can learn code using this book!”

Writer Jurie Horneman

Author of CoderDojo Nano: Make Your Own Game Jurie Horneman has been working in the game development industry for more than 15 years.

stuffed toy rabbit wearing glasses

Jurie would get on well with Babbage, I think.

He shares how he got into coding, and what he has learnt while creating this awesome book:

“I’ve been designing and programming games since 1991, starting with ancient home computers, and now I’m working with PCs and consoles. As a game designer, it’s my job to teach players the rules of the game in a fun and playful manner — that gave me some useful experience for writing the book.

I believe that, if you want to understand something properly, you have to teach it to others. Therefore, writing this book was very educational for me, as I hope reading it will be for learners.”

Asked what his favorite thing about the book is, Jurie said he loves the incredible pixel art design: “The artist (Gary J Lucken, Army of Trolls) did a great job to help explain some of the abstract concepts in the book.”

Pixel image of a landscape with an East Asian temple on a lonely mountain

Gary’s art is also just gorgeous.

How can you get your copy?

You can pre-order CoderDojo Nano: Make Your Own Game here. Its initial pricing is £9.99 (around €11), and discounted copies with free international delivery are available here.

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A printing GIF camera? Is that even a thing?

Abhishek Singh’s printing GIF camera uses two Raspberry Pis, the Model 3 and the Zero W, to take animated images and display them on an ejectable secondary screen.

Instagif – A DIY Camera that prints GIFs instantly

I built a camera that snaps a GIF and ejects a little cartridge so you can hold a moving photo in your hand! I’m calling it the “Instagif NextStep”.

The humble GIF

Created in 1987, Graphics Interchange Format files, better known as GIFs, have somewhat taken over the internet. And whether you pronounce it G-IF or J-IF, you’ve probably used at least one to express an emotion, animate images on your screen, or create small, movie-like memories of events.

In 2004, all patents on the humble GIF expired, which added to the increased usage of the file format. And by the early 2010s, sites such as giphy.com and phone-based GIF keyboards were introduced into our day-to-day lives.

A GIF from a scene in The Great Gatsby - Raspberry Pi GIF Camera

Welcome to the age of the GIF

Polaroid cameras

Polaroid cameras have a somewhat older history. While the first documented instant camera came into existence in 1923, commercial iterations made their way to market in the 1940s, with Polaroid’s model 95 Land Camera.

In recent years, the instant camera has come back into fashion, with camera stores and high street fashion retailers alike stocking their shelves with pastel-coloured, affordable models. But nothing beats the iconic look of the Polaroid Spirit series, and the rainbow colour stripe that separates it from its competitors.

Polaroid Spirit Camera - Raspberry Pi GIF Camera

Shake it like a Polaroid picture…

And if you’re one of our younger readers and find yourself wondering where else you’ve seen those stripes, you’re probably more familiar with previous versions of the Instagram logo, because, well…

Instagram Logo - Raspberry Pi GIF Camera

I’m sorry for the comment on the previous image. It was just too easy.

Abhishek Singh’s printing GIF camera

Abhishek labels his creation the Instagif NextStep, and cites his inspiration for the project as simply wanting to give it a go, and to see if he could hold a ‘moving photo’.

“What I love about these kinds of projects is that they involve a bunch of different skill sets and disciplines”, he explains at the start of his lengthy, highly GIFed and wonderfully detailed imgur tutorial. “Hardware, software, 3D modeling, 3D printing, circuit design, mechanical/electrical engineering, design, fabrication etc. that need to be integrated for it to work seamlessly. Ironically, this is also what I hate about these kinds of projects”

Care to see how the whole thing comes together? Well, in the true spirit of the project, Abhishek created this handy step-by-step GIF.

Piecing it together

I thought I’ll start off with the entire assembly and then break down the different elements. As you can see, everything is assembled from the base up in layers helping in easy assembly and quick disassembly for troubleshooting

The build comes in two parts – the main camera housing a Raspberry Pi 3 and Camera Module V2, and the ejectable cartridge fitted with Raspberry Pi Zero W and Adafruit PiTFT screen.

When the capture button is pressed, the camera takes 3 seconds’ worth of images and converts them into .gif format via a Python script. Once compressed and complete, the Pi 3 sends the file to the Zero W via a network connection. When it is satisfied that the Zero W has the image, the Pi 3 automatically ejects the ‘printed GIF’ cartridge, and the image is displayed.

A demonstration of how the GIF is displayed on the Raspberry Pi GIF Camera

For a full breakdown of code, 3D-printable files, and images, check out the full imgur post. You can see more of Abhishek’s work at his website here.

Create GIFs with a Raspberry Pi

Want to create GIFs with your Raspberry Pi? Of course you do. Who wouldn’t? So check out our free time-lapse animations resource. As with all our learning resources, the project is free for you to use at home and in your clubs or classrooms. And once you’ve mastered the art of Pi-based GIF creation, why not incorporate it into another project? Say, a motion-detecting security camera or an on-the-go tweeting GIF camera – the possibilities are endless.

And make sure you check out Abhishek’s other Raspberry Pi GIF project, Peeqo, who we covered previously in the blog. So cute. SO CUTE.

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Code Club reaches 1 in 5 UK secondary schools

Today, we’re excited to announce the expansion of Code Club to secondary school ages up to 13. When we made our plans known last May, we were beginning work with a pilot group of 50 UK secondary schools to discover how we could best support them, and how we could make Code Club work as well for children aged 12 and 13 as it does for those in its original age range of 9 to 11. Now, new projects are available for secondary-aged children, and we will continue to create more resources to build on the support we offer this age group.

An animated gif with happy Code Club robots and text showing that Code Club is extending to 9- to 13-year-olds

One in five UK secondary schools

In extending Code Club’s age range to 9-13, we’re responding to huge demand. One in five UK state-sector secondary schools has already registered with the programme, and most of these — almost 600 of them — are already running Code Clubs.

By giving secondaries access to the Code Club support network, and by providing new, more advanced programming projects, we will help schools better to meet the needs of their students; together, we can offer many thousands more children the opportunity to develop essential skills in programming and computing. Libraries and other non-school venues will also be able to welcome children of a wider range of ages to their clubs.

New Code Club resources

Our first five projects for older children offer a variety of ways for more advanced coders to build on their skills and explore further programming concepts.

From ‘Flappy Parrot’ and Where’s Wally-inspired ‘Lineup’, to ‘Binary Hero’ and quiz-tastic ‘Guess the Flag’, there’s something to spark everyone’s imagination. You can read more about these new resources in today’s Code Club UK blog post.

Help Code Club in your local school

Around 300 secondary schools across the UK have registered with Code Club but have not yet started their club, because they’re still looking for volunteers to support them. Can you help these keen teachers and students get up and running? If you can volunteer an hour each week, either on your own or taking turns with friends or colleagues, you could make all the difference to a Code Club near you.

A Code Club in every community

We want every young person between the ages of 9 and 13 to have the opportunity to join a Code Club, and we will continue working hard to deliver our goal of putting a Code Club in every community. Make sure your local school, youth club, or library knows how to get involved.

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Create a text-based adventure game with FutureLearn

Learning with Raspberry Pi has never been so easy! We’re adding a new course to FutureLearn today, and you can take part anywhere in the world.

FutureLearn: the story so far…

In February 2017, we were delighted to launch two free online CPD training courses on the FutureLearn platform, available anywhere in the world. Since the launch, more than 30,000 educators have joined these courses: Teaching Programming in Primary Schools, and Teaching Physical Computing with Raspberry Pi and Python.

Futurelearn Raspberry Pi

Thousands of educators have been building their skills – completing tasks such as writing a program in Python to make an LED blink, or building a voting app in Scratch. The two courses are scaffolded to build skills, week by week. Learners are supported by videos, screencasts, and articles, and they have the chance to apply what they have learned in as many different practical projects as possible.

We have had some excellent feedback from learners on the courses, such as Kyle Wilke who commented: “Fantastic course. Nice integration of text-based and video instruction. Was very impressed how much support was provided by fellow students, kudos to us. Can’t wait to share this with fellow educators.”

Brand new course

We are launching a new course this autumn. You can join lead educator Laura Sach to learn object-oriented programming principles by creating your own text-based adventure game in Python. The course is aimed at educators who have programming experience, but have never programmed in the object-oriented style.

Future Learn: Object-oriented Programming in Python trailer

Our newest FutureLearn course in now live. You can join lead educator Laura Sachs to learn object-oriented programming principles by creating your own text-based adventure game in Python. The course is aimed at educators who have programming experience, but have never programmed in the object-oriented style.

The course will introduce you to the principles of object-oriented programming in Python, showing you how to create objects, functions, methods, and classes.

Raspberry Pi

With yesterday being Biscuit Week on The Great British Bake Off, it seems like the perfect time to share this beauty from our latest free FutureLearn course. Would like to know more? Simply head to…

You’ll use what you learn to create your own text-based adventure game. You will have the chance to share your code with other learners, and to see theirs. If you’re an educator, you’ll also be able to develop ideas for using object-oriented programming in your classroom.

Take part

Sign up now to join us on the course, starting today, September 4. Our courses are free to join online – so you can learn wherever you are, and whenever you want.

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Hello World Issue 3: Approaching Assessment

It’s the beginning of a new school year, and the latest issue of Hello World is here! Hello World is our magazine about computing and digital making for educators, and it’s a collaboration between The Raspberry Pi Foundation and Computing at School, part of the British Computing Society.

The front cover of Hello World 3

In issue 3, our international panel of experts takes an in-depth look at assessment in computer science.

Approaching assessment, and much more

Our cover feature explores innovative, practical, and effective approaches to testing and learning. The issue is packed with other great resources, guides, features and lesson plans to support educators.

Highlights include:

  • Tutorials and lesson plans on Scratch Pong, games design, and the database-building Python library, SQLite3
  • Supporting learning with online video
  • The potential of open-source resources in education
  • A bluffer’s guide to Non-Examination Assessments (NEA) for GCSE Computer Science
  • A look at play and creativity in programming

Get your copy of Hello World 3

Hello World is available as a free Creative Commons download for anyone around the world who is interested in Computer Science and digital making education. Grab the latest issue straight from the Hello World website.

Thanks to the very generous support of our sponsors BT, we are able to offer free printed versions of the magazine to serving educators in the UK. It’s for teachers, Code Club volunteers, teaching assistants, teacher trainers, and others who help children and young people learn about computing and digital making. Remember to subscribe to receive your free copy, posted directly to your home.

Free book!

As a special bonus for our print subscribers, this issue comes bundled with a copy of Ian Livingstone and Shahneila Saeed’s new book, Hacking the Curriculum: Creative Computing and the Power of Play

Front cover of Hacking the Curriculum by Ian Livingstone and Shahneila Saeed - Hello World 3

This gorgeous-looking image comes courtesy of Jonathan Green

The book explains the critical importance of coding and computing in modern schools, and offers teachers and school leaders practical guidance on how to improve their computing provision. Thanks to Ian Livingstone, Shahneila Saeed, and John Catt Educational Ltd. for helping to make this possible. The book will be available with issue 3 to new subscribers while stocks last.

10,000 subscribers

We are very excited to announce that Hello World now has more than 10,000 subscribers!

Banner to celebrate 10000 subscribers

We’re celebrating this milestone, but we’d love to reach even more computing and digital making educators. Help us to spread the word to teachers, volunteers and home educators in the UK.

Get involved

Share your teaching experiences in computing and related subjects with Hello World, and help us to help other educators! When you air your questions and challenges on our letters page, other educators are ready to help you. Drop us an email to submit letters, articles, lesson plans, and questions for our FAQ pages – wherever you are in the world, get in touch with us by emailing contact@helloworld.cc.

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MagPi 61: ten amazing Raspberry Pi Zero W projects

Hey folks! Rob here, with another roundup of the latest The MagPi magazine. MagPi 61 focuses on some incredible ‘must make’ Raspberry Pi Zero W projects, 3D printers and – oh, did someone mention the Google AIY Voice Projects Kit?

Cover of The MagPi magazine with a picture of the Pi Zero W - MagPi 61

Make amazing Raspberry Pi Zero W projects with our latest issue

Inside MagPi 61

In issue 61, we’re focusing on the small but mighty wonder that is the Raspberry Pi Zero W, and on some of the very best projects we’ve found for you to build with it. From arcade machines to robots, dash cams, and more – it’s time to make the most of our $10 computer.

And if that’s not enough, we’ve also delved deeper into the maker relationship between Raspberry Pi and Arduino, with some great creations such as piano stairs, a jukebox, and a smart home system. There’s also a selection of excellent tutorials on building 3D printers, controlling Hue lights, and making cool musical instruments.

A spread of The MagPi magazine showing a DJ deck tutorial - MagPi 61

Spin it, DJ!

Get the MagPi 61

The new issue is out right now, and you can pick up a copy at WH Smith, Tesco, Sainsbury’s, and Asda. If you live in the US, check out your local Barnes & Noble or Micro Center over the next few days. You can also get the new issue online from our store, or digitally via our Android or iOS app. And don’t forget, there’s always the free PDF as well.

Subscribe for free goodies

Some of you have asked me about the goodies that we give out to subscribers. This is how it works: if you take out a twelve-month print subscription to The MagPi, you’ll get a Pi Zero W, Pi Zero case, and adapter cables, absolutely free! This offer does not currently have an end date.

Pre-order AIY Kits

We have some AIY Voice Kit news! Micro Center has opened pre-orders for the kits in America, and Pimoroni has set up a notification service for those closer to the UK.

We hope you all enjoy the issue. Oh, and if you’re at World Maker Faire, New York, come and see us at the Raspberry Pi stall! Otherwise – see you next month.

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Netflix develops Morse code search option

What happens when Netflix gives its staff two days to hack the platform and create innovative (and often unnecessary) variations on the streaming service?

This. This is what happens.

Hack Day Summer 2017 Teleflix

Uploaded by NetflixOpenSource on 2017-08-28.

Netflix Hack Day

Twice a year, the wonderful team at Netflix is given two days to go nuts and create fun, random builds, taking inspiration from Netflix and its content. So far they’ve debuted a downgraded version of the streaming platform played on an original Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), turned hit show Narcos into a video game, and utilised VR technology into many more builds that, while they’ll never be made public, have no doubt led to some lightbulb moments for the creative teams involved.

DarNES – Netflix Hack Day – Winter 2015

In a world… where devices proliferate… darNES digs back in time to provide Netflix access to the original Nintendo Entertainment System.

Kevin Spacey? More like ‘Kevin Spacebar’, am I right? Aha…ha…haaaa…I’ll get my coat.

Teleflix

The Teleflix build from this summer’s Hack Day is obviously the best one yet, as it uses a Raspberry Pi. By writing code that decodes the dots and dashes from an original 1920s telegraph (provided by AT&T, and lovingly restored by the team using ketchup!) into keystrokes, they’re able to search for their favourite shows via Morse code.

Netflix Morse Code

Morse code, for the unaware, is a method for transmitting letters and numbers via a standardised series of beeps, clicks, or flashes. Stuck in a sticky situation? Three dots followed by three dashes and a further three dots gives you ‘SOS’. Sorted. So long as there’s someone there to see or hear it, who also understands Morse Code.

Morse Code

Morse code was a method of transmiting textual information as a series of on-off tones that could be directly understood by a skilled listener. Mooo-Theme: http://soundcloud.com/mooojvm/mooo-theme

So if you’d like to watch, for example, The Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, you simply send: – …. . / ..- -. -… .-. . .- -.- .- -… .-.. . / -.- .. — — -.– / … -.-. …. — .. -.. – and you’re set. Easy!

To reach Netflix, the team used a Playstation 4. However, if you want to skip a tech step, you could stream Netflix directly to your Raspberry Pi by following this relatively new tutorial. Nobody at Pi Towers has tried it out yet, but if you have we’d be interested to see how you got on in the comments below.

And if you’d like to play around a little more with the Raspberry Pi and Morse code, you can pick up your own Morse code key, or build one using conductive components such as buttons or bananas, and try it out for yourself.

Alex’s Netflix-themed Morse code quiz

Just for fun, here are the titles of some of my favourite shows to watch on Netflix, translated into Morse code. Using the key below, why not take a break and challenge your mind to translate them back into English. Reward yourself +10 imaginary House Points for each correct answer.

Netflix Morse Code

  1. -.. — -.-. – — .-. / .– …. —
  2. …. .- -. -. .. -… .- .-..
  3. – …. . / — .-
  4. … . -. … . —..
  5. .— . … … .. -.-. .- / .— — -. . …
  6. –. .. .-.. — — .-. . / –. .. .-. .-.. …
  7. –. .-.. — .–
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