Tag:
developing world

RACHEL-Pi – delivering education worldwide

Liz: If you’re a regular reader, you’ll have noticed more and more frequent mentions over the last year of a piece of kit called RACHEL-Pi. RACHEL is an offline server, run on a Raspberry Pi, full of educational content from teaching curriculums, Khan Academy materials, Wikipedia, classic literature, reference material and textbooks; alongside vital community... Continue reading

Community, coffee and classrooms in Nicaragua

Liz: Today’s guest post is from David Mitchell, who emailed me last week about some work he’s been doing in Nicaragua with the Raspberry Pi, both at a community level and in a local business environment. We thought that what he’s doing is a real exemplar of how Raspberry Pi can offer whole communities a let... Continue reading

Guest post: A Pi lab in rural Ghana

Liz: This post comes from Heather and Trevor Grant, who work with a student-led charity called The Best of Both, based at the British School of Brussels. Thanks both!  For the past five years The Best of Both initiative has worked with state-sector rural schools around Bolgatanga in the Upper East of Ghana to help... Continue reading

Guest post from Khan Academy Lite

Update: KA Lite dropped us a line to let us know they had a newer version of today’s post ready for us this evening, that they’d prefer us to use. The updated version is below. Enjoy! Liz: We’ve been talking a bit about Khan Academy Lite on this blog recently. KA Lite is the offline version of... Continue reading

The Kingdom of Bhutan’s first Pi: a Khan Academy server

We were chatting to Natasha Lomas from TechCrunch (no relation to our own Pete) last week about the distribution of Raspberry Pis across the world. Here’s the article she wrote about it. We designed the Pi with the explicit goal of getting kids in the UK coding, but the popularity of the platform has spread... Continue reading

Bringing computing to rural Cameroon

Liz: I was going to post this tomorrow, but it’s so good I just couldn’t wait. We’ve just had some mail from Geert Maertens, from Anzegem in Belgium. He’s been working with a small group of volunteers to raise money to bring computing to a school in a remote area of Cameroon. I’ll quote him... Continue reading