[HOW TO] Use your RPI as a DNS server and speed up yo' net!


49 posts   Page 1 of 2   1, 2
by stephendotexe » Tue Jun 04, 2013 9:16 pm
Cache all of those queries locally and speed up your internet experience. This guide shows you how to get a simple dns and dhcpd server running on your RPI using dnsmasq.

The full guide can be found on my blog here: "DNS on Raspberry Pi -- Speed up your internet Experience"

If you'd like to do the one-click installation, you can simply run:

Code: Select all
curl "https://raw.github.com/stephen-mw/raspberrypi/master/roles/dnsmasq_server" | sudo sh


Any feedback or comments here or on the blog or in github is greatly appreciated. Thank you!

HOWTO:

Use your raspberry Pi as a DNS cache to speed up your internet

Here's something you can do with your raspberry pi that will make your internet experience faster.

Set up your raspberry pi to cache DNS queries so that they can be answered locally in a fraction of time and ditch your slow ISP domain name server.

If you'd rather not read the windy explanation of what this is or how this works, you can skip all the way down to the bottom for the script example, or simply run:

Code: Select all
$ curl "https://raw.github.com/stephen-mw/raspberrypi/master/roles/dnsmasq_server" | sudo sh


But never run a command like that without first checking the source file.

A little background on DNS

When you type in "www.heystephenwood.com" into your browser and hit enter, there's a little transaction that goes on under the hood. In order to visit the website, your machine must translate the alphanumeric website name into a series of numbers called an IP address. It accomplishes this by sending the query to a domain name server.

The whole trip can take anywhere between 1 ms to 250 ms or more depending on your connection. This happens every time you visit a url (depending on your browser).

You can test it yourself using the tool dig.

Code: Select all
  $ dig heystephenwood.com   
  ; <<>> DiG 9.7.6-P1 <<>> heystephenwood.com   
  ;; global options: +cmd   
  ;; Got answer:   
  ;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 42972   
  ;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 5, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 0   
  ;; QUESTION SECTION:   
  ;heystephenwood.com. IN A   
  ;; ANSWER SECTION:   
  heystephenwood.com. 14359 IN A 64.90.54.29   
  heystephenwood.com. 14359 IN A 216.239.38.21   
  heystephenwood.com. 14359 IN A 216.239.36.21   
  heystephenwood.com. 14359 IN A 216.239.34.21   
  heystephenwood.com. 14359 IN A 216.239.32.21   
  ;; Query time: 130 msec   
  ;; SERVER: 192.168.0.1#53(192.168.0.1)   
  ;; WHEN: Sun Feb 10 22:09:26 2013   
  ;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 116 


Dig is a very powerful and fun tool. Here you'll see the question and answer. The important part is right in the middle:

;; Query time: 130 msec


That query took 130 ms. That means from the time I hit "enter" on my browser to the point where I was actually able to fetch and display a webpage there was a 120 ms pause while I waited to get the server's address. Those little pauses add up!

We're going to make our internet experience faster by storing these records in memory on our own DNS cache so that they can be fetched nearly instantaneously. The best part of this is that the cache is shared for all users, so the more people you have browser the web at your house the bigger and better the cache.

Introducing dnsmasq

Dnsasq is a very lightweight dns and dhcpd server. The benefit of dnsmasq is that it's fast, very easy to use, and offers the ability to use both dns and dhcpd services under one roof. The raspberry pi makes for a perfect vessel for a DNS server because of its low power consumption and easy setup.

Testing DNS query times

These next steps are optional but make the transition to your own raspberry pi dns server more more fun. We'll run the loop below to get a good working baseline for our DNS speed. You can run this from your raspberry pi or from a linux or mac osx box.

In this example I'm using the default Comcast public DNS server which they supply. Here's a bash loop without any averages:

$ for i in {1..30}; do dig heystephenwood.com | grep time; done
;; Query time: 159 msec
;; Query time: 17 msec
;; Query time: 23 msec
;; Query time: 18 msec
;; Query time: 156 msec
;; Query time: 93 msec
...
...

Doing it serially can take awhile, so let's pipe the whole thing into xargs and run it in parallel of sets of 10:

Code: Select all
$ for i in {1..30}; do echo heystephenwood.com;done | xargs -I^ -P10 dig ^ | grep time


Let's average them and get a baseline, because what's the point in trying to optimize a system if we can't actually see if it's improved? We're going to run the same command but we'll pipe it to awk to sum the columns for us to grab our mean.

$ for i in {1..30}; do echo heystephenwood.com; done | xargs -I^ -P10 dig ^ | grep time | awk /time/'{sum+=$4} END { print "Average query = ",sum/NR,"ms"}'
Average query = 41.3 ms


Let's take a look at just how far our packets need to travel to our DNS server:

Code: Select all
$ traceroute 75.75.75.75   
  traceroute to 75.75.75.75 (75.75.75.75), 64 hops max, 52 byte packets   
  1 192.168.0.1 (192.168.0.1) 2.989 ms 0.927 ms 0.982 ms   
  2 73.97.112.1 (73.97.112.1) 10.238 ms 8.582 ms 10.133 ms   
  3 te-0-0-0-7-ur08.seattle.wa.seattle.comcast.net (68.87.207.89) 14.287 ms 19.168 ms 10.108 ms   
  4 ae-20-0-ar03.seattle.wa.seattle.comcast.net (69.139.164.129) 24.351 ms 12.557 ms 14.335 ms   
  5 he-1-6-0-0-10-cr01.seattle.wa.ibone.comcast.net (68.86.94.69) 15.803 ms   
   he-1-8-0-0-11-cr01.seattle.wa.ibone.comcast.net (68.86.95.249) 15.441 ms 23.240 ms   
  6 so-6-1-0-0-ar03.troutdale.or.bverton.comcast.net (68.86.90.214) 14.503 ms 16.077 ms 14.468 ms   
  7 te-7-4-ur01-d.beaverton.or.bverton.comcast.net (68.87.216.41) 15.748 ms 17.018 ms 18.251 ms   
  8 cdns01.comcast.net (75.75.75.75) 15.407 ms 23.341 ms 14.946 ms   

In this case it's 8 hops. Generally speaking, the less hops a packet needs to travel to a destination the better. By using a cache, we'll only need to make this trip once, then we'll store the record for quick retrieval.

Let's talk cache

Installing dnsmasq is easy on your raspberry pi:

Code: Select all
 $ sudo apt-get install -y dnsmasq 


Stop the service so that we can tinker with its configurations

Code: Select all
 $ sudo service dnsmasq stop   


Let's open the conf file and get the settings we want. For reference I've included my own configuration.

You'll find the configuration at /etc/dnsmasq.conf if you installed from the repo.

Code: Select all
# Dnsmasq.conf for raspberry pi
# /etc/dnsmasq.conf
# http://www.thekelleys.org.uk/dnsmasq/docs/dnsmasq.conf.example

# Set up your local domain here
domain=raspberry.local
resolv-file=/etc/resolv.dnsmasq
min-port=4096
server=8.8.8.8
server=8.8.4.4

# Max cache size dnsmasq can give us, and we want all of it!
cache-size=10000

# Below are settings for dhcp. Comment them out if you dont want
# dnsmasq to serve up dhcpd requests.
# dhcp-range=192.168.0.100,192.168.0.149,255.255.255.0,1440m
# dhcp-option=3,192.168.0.1
# dhcp-authoritative


The "server=" setting is declaring the upstream domain name servers. dnsmasq never actually looks at root hints to resolve an ip address. If it doesn't know the answer, it just asks a different dns (in this case it's google).

I've included the settings for having dnsmasq be the dhcp server as well. This is optional, but it gives you a few extra perks: the dnsmasq dns will be the default, and you can control the lease space.

Note: these settings assume that 192.160.0.1 is your default gateway. If it's not, you'll need to adjust the settings to reflect it.

Don't forget to start the service again

Code: Select all
 $ service dnsmasq start 


Test your new dns cache

Let's run that same command earlier. Once the record is retrieved, dnsmasq will store the record locally.

$ for i in {1..30}; do dig heystephenwood.com | grep time; sleep 1; done | awk /time/'{sum+=$4} END { print "Average query = ",sum/NR,"ms"}'
Average query = 2.33333 ms


From 41 ms down to 2.3? I'll take that!

Set up your computer to use your new DNS server

This part can be accomplished a few different ways. For mac, you can see this guide, or for windows you can see here. I recommend you use your raspberry pi as a dhcp server as well, that way every device on your network will use your fancy new dns server by default.

Script the bootstrap

Anytime you need to do something on your linux server, you should get into two habits: 1) distilling your creation into scripts that can be called over and over again, and 2) storing those configurations in source control.

Let's bootstrap the whole gosh darn thing with a single bash script.

You can call the script simply enough right from your raspberry pi

Code: Select all
$ curl "https://raw.github.com/stephendotexe/raspberrypi/master/roles/dnsmasq_server"


Code: Select all
#!/bin/bash
set -e

# Raspberry Pi dnsmasq script
# Stephen Wood
# www.heystephenwood.com
#
# Usage: $ sudo ./raspberrypi_dnsmasq
#
# Net install:
#   $ curl https://raw.github.com/stephendotexe/raspberrypi/master/roles/dnsmasq_server | sudo sh

# Must be run as root
if [[ `whoami` != "root" ]]
then
  echo "This install must be run as root or with sudo."
  exit
fi

apt-get install -y dnsmasq
cat - > /etc/dnsmasq.conf <<DNSMASQCONF
# Dnsmasq.conf for raspberry pi
# By Stephen Wood heystephenwood.com
# Full examples found here:
# http://www.thekelleys.org.uk/dnsmasq/docs/dnsmasq.conf.example

# Set up your local domain here
domain=raspberry.local
resolv-file=/etc/resolv.dnsmasq
min-port=4096
server=8.8.8.8
server=8.8.4.4

# Max cache size dnsmasq can give us, and we want all of it!
cache-size=10000

# Below are settings for dhcp. Comment them out if you dont want
# dnsmasq to serve up dhcpd requests.
# dhcp-range=192.168.0.100,192.168.0.149,255.255.255.0,1440m
# dhcp-option=3,192.168.0.1
# dhcp-authoritative

DNSMASQCONF

service dnsmasq restart

echo "Testing dns performance with random urls"

# We'll generate a list of urls that we're moderately certain doesn't exist in our cache to get a good base line for speed increases.
URLS=`for i in {1..50}; do echo www.$RANDOM.com;done`

# Make the requests in parallel
echo $URLS | xargs -I^ -P50 dig @127.0.0.1 grep time | awk /time/'{sum+=$4} END { print "average response = ", sum/NR,"ms"}'
echo $URLS | xargs -I^ -P50 dig @127.0.0.1 grep time | awk /time/'{sum+=$4} END { print "average response = ", sum/NR,"ms"}'
echo $URLS | xargs -I^ -P50 dig @127.0.0.1 grep time | awk /time/'{sum+=$4} END { print "average response = ", sum/NR,"ms"}'

echo 'Installation complete. Enjoy!'
Last edited by stephendotexe on Sat Jun 06, 2015 6:35 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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by rpdom » Wed Jun 05, 2013 5:48 am
Good, very detailed description and instructions.

Although one very minor point. I'd prefer to put a config file called "pimasq.conf" in /etc/dnsmasq.d/ instead of replacing the existing file. This is the "Debian way" (and therefore Raspbian) of handling config files now. It means you can leave the default file in place and override the settings with your own file. It also means the default file can get updated on upgrades when needed :)

I've been using dnsmasq on a low-spec PC for my home network for several years now. It's very good and Iike the fact that it reads the /etc/hosts file on the computer it is running on and lets entries in that override any external ones :)
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by stephendotexe » Wed Jun 05, 2013 6:13 pm
Thanks RPdom. You are exactly right. I'll update the configs in the git branch.

I'm going to write a followup to this post about using dnsmasq and a list of known advertisement DNS names to effectively block ads on your entire network. Dnsmasq makes this kind of stuff easy.
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by xXAzazelXx » Wed Jul 24, 2013 9:39 am
It seems my Adblock Plus stops working after switching to Dnsmasq from 192.168.2.1
Is there a way to fix that?
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by stephendotexe » Wed Jul 24, 2013 5:13 pm
xXAzazelXx wrote:It seems my Adblock Plus stops working after switching to Dnsmasq from 192.168.2.1
Is there a way to fix that?


Adblock plus should be agnostic to which DNS server you use so long as you're not routing your traffic in strange ways. What happens exactly? Do ads start suddenly showing up?
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by xXAzazelXx » Thu Jul 25, 2013 8:10 am
stephendotexe wrote:
xXAzazelXx wrote:It seems my Adblock Plus stops working after switching to Dnsmasq from 192.168.2.1
Is there a way to fix that?


Adblock plus should be agnostic to which DNS server you use so long as you're not routing your traffic in strange ways. What happens exactly? Do ads start suddenly showing up?


You are 100% right. Sorry it seems the issue was with the Adblock it self. I've installed the addon and it is blocking now.
Out of curiosity where is the cache data kept?
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by stephendotexe » Thu Jul 25, 2013 4:43 pm
You are 100% right. Sorry it seems the issue was with the Adblock it self. I've installed the addon and it is blocking now.
Out of curiosity where is the cache data kept?


I'm not sure how dnsmasq stores the queries, but my guess is that it's an in-memory store. If you'd like to see metadata regarding your cache, you can send a sig HUP to the dnsmasq process and it will print out some relevant information into syslog.

By example:

Code: Select all
$ sudo kill -HUP `pidof dnsmasq`
$ sudo tail /var/log/syslog
Jul 25 16:38:03 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: started, version 2.59 cachesize 150
Jul 25 16:38:03 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: compile time options: IPv6 GNU-getopt DBus i18n DHCP TFTP conntrack IDN
Jul 25 16:38:03 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: failed to access /var/run/dnsmasq/resolv.conf: No such file or directory
Jul 25 16:38:03 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: read /etc/hosts - 7 addresses
Jul 25 16:38:07 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: reading /var/run/dnsmasq/resolv.conf
Jul 25 16:38:07 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: using nameserver 8.8.8.8#53
Jul 25 16:38:07 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: using nameserver 8.8.4.4#53
Jul 25 16:38:07 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: using nameserver 10.0.2.3#53
Jul 25 16:38:36 precise64 dnsmasq[4393]: read /etc/hosts - 7 addresses


If you're interested in getting better statistics for your dns queries, you'll need to install something a little heavier duty such as bind. The RPI can very easily run as a bind server, but you don't get the added dhcpd functionality out of the box and it's also a little more difficult to set up.
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by 65coupei6 » Fri Jul 26, 2013 1:01 am
So, when I set up my computer to use the new DNS server. Do I use the ip address of the Raspberry PI that
has dnsmasq installed?
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by wildbill001 » Fri Jul 26, 2013 3:25 am
Very interesting and timely for me as I was just contemplating setting up a RPi as my DNS/DHCP server for the two networks I have here at home. Currently running 2 small VMs, one for DNS, the other for DHCP. You mentioned in your post that dnsmasq also did dhcp. Have you had a chance to set that up yet and if so, how is it working for you?

Bill W
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by stephendotexe » Fri Jul 26, 2013 4:02 am
65coupei6 wrote:So, when I set up my computer to use the new DNS server. Do I use the ip address of the Raspberry PI that
has dnsmasq installed?


Yes. Once you have your raspberry pi configured to handle DNS traffic, you can immediately point your computer at your raspberry pi server.

Another option is to turn off your home router's dhcp server and use the dhcp server option of dnsmasq. Then whenever any computer on your network gets an IP it will also automatically start using your raspberry pi as a DNS.
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by stephendotexe » Fri Jul 26, 2013 4:15 am
wildbill001 wrote:Very interesting and timely for me as I was just contemplating setting up a RPi as my DNS/DHCP server for the two networks I have here at home. Currently running 2 small VMs, one for DNS, the other for DHCP. You mentioned in your post that dnsmasq also did dhcp. Have you had a chance to set that up yet and if so, how is it working for you?

Bill W


I really like dnsmasq and I use it for my home network for dns and dhcp. It's simple, easy to configure, and rock stable. The real benefit of dnsmasq is that it also does dhcpd out of the box.

There are a few drawbacks. The first is that dnsmasq doesn't give any real statistics, so gathering things like RTT is impossible. There is also a limit of 300 items in the cache. That shouldn't be a deal breaker for a home network.

Other options to try:

PowerDNS recursor -- supports a cache up to 10k. A little more difficult to set up and maintain. No dhcp.
djbdns -- Very lightweight dns server. The only reason I don't use this is because there's no support for dhcp.
Bind9 -- The heavyweight champion. Tried and true. Difficult to configure for a beginner but there's lots of documentation. Getting it off the ground as just a DNS forwarder shouldn't take very long.
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by stephendotexe » Thu Sep 05, 2013 10:11 pm
wildbill001 wrote:Very interesting and timely for me as I was just contemplating setting up a RPi as my DNS/DHCP server for the two networks I have here at home. Currently running 2 small VMs, one for DNS, the other for DHCP. You mentioned in your post that dnsmasq also did dhcp. Have you had a chance to set that up yet and if so, how is it working for you?

Bill W

Sorry I didn't respond to your original question. Dnsmasq works great as a dhcpd server. You get a lot of features immediately out of the box. For example, when a host gets a dhcp lease, it also gets a PTR record and becomes searchable on your domain. To get this kind of functionality with Bind/isc-dhcpd-server you would have to do a lot of configuring.

You can also very easily set static IPs from within the dnsmasq configuration file, though I don't find that very useful when I can just connect to a machine via its hostname.
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by justkelly » Sun Sep 29, 2013 2:33 am
Hi. I'm working through the tutorial and it seems to be straightforward, but I'm not getting quite the same results. I pulled down dnsmasq and changed the conf file, but when I rerun the dig batch I'm not seeing any performance change. I have manually edited my dns settings in /etc/resolv.conf, would that have anything to do with it?
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by stephendotexe » Sun Sep 29, 2013 5:26 am
justkelly wrote:...I'm not seeing any performance change. I have manually edited my dns settings in /etc/resolv.conf, would that have anything to do with it?


Lots of things could be happening. First of all, what is your performance? Paste the before and afters here so we can see what's going on.

Also, be careful with changing /etc/resolv.conf. In most every modern debian distro resolv.conf is a file that's controlled by resolvconfd and will be overwritten every time dhclient is run. You can force resolvconf to use your specified DNS server by adding it to the top of /etc/resolvconf/resolv.conf.d/head the same way you would add it to /etc/resolv.conf.

Just run "service resolvconf restart" to make sure your changes were picked up in /etc/resolv.conf
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by 65coupei6 » Sat Nov 02, 2013 6:19 pm
Has anyone got the error:

dnsmasq: cannot open or create lease file /var/lib/misc/dnsmasq.leases

Any fixes? I checked and the directory /var/lib/misc is there.
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by stephendotexe » Sat Nov 02, 2013 7:42 pm
65coupei6 wrote:Has anyone got the error:

dnsmasq: cannot open or create lease file /var/lib/misc/dnsmasq.leases

Any fixes? I checked and the directory /var/lib/misc is there.


It's possible that the dnsmasq program cannot create the file. I would create the file manually and change the ownership to root and then try again.

Code: Select all
sudo mkdir -p  /var/lib/misc/
sudo touch /var/lib/misc/dnsmasq.leases
sudo chown -R root:root  /var/lib/misc/


If you're running dnsmasq as a user other than root, you'll need to change the ownership to that user.
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by 65coupei6 » Sat Nov 02, 2013 9:32 pm
Thank you! I will try it.
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by unkzo » Fri Nov 08, 2013 4:43 am
Great work, i've been testing some cache servers time ago(including with 800mhz overclock) and unbound smashes bind and dnsmasq in performance.
This article is in portuguese but look to the charts:
http://everpi.tsar.in/2013/10/benchmark-raspberry-pi-como-cache-dns.html

Image
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by PatrickDickey » Sun May 11, 2014 6:56 am
I'm running into problems with getting the DHCP portion working. Currently, my DHCP/DNS is provided by dnsmasq on an Amahi Home Server. I want to migrate it over to the Raspberry Pi, because I've been having issues with the server.

Here is my current /etc/dnsmasq.conf file:
Code: Select all
pi@raspbmc:~$ cat /etc/dnsmasq.conf
# Dnsmasq.conf for raspberry pi   
# By Stephen Wood heystephenwood.com 
# Full examples found here: 
# http://www.thekelleys.org.uk/dnsmasq/docs/dnsmasq.conf.example 
 
# Set up your local domain here   
domain=local.lan   
interface=eth0
resolv-file=/etc/resolv.dnsmasq 
# min-port=4096   
server=8.8.8.8
server=8.8.4.4
ptr-record=98.2.168.192.in-addr.arpa,hda.local.lan
address=/hda/hda.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/search/search.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/setup/setup.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/calendar/calendar.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/help/help.local.lan/192.168.2.98
ptr-record=1.2.168.192.in-addr.arpa,router.local.lan
address=/router/router.local.lan/192.168.2.1
address=/webmin/webmin.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/mythweb/mythweb.local.lan/192.168.2.5
address=/dcky-mythbuntu/dcky-mythbuntu.local.lan/192.168.2.5
address=/dcky-ubuntu-fedoraxp/dcky-ubuntu-fedoraxp.local.lan/192.168.2.8

     
# Max cache size dnsmasq can give us, and we want all of it!   
cache-size=10000   
     
# Below are settings for dhcp. Comment them out if you dont want   
# dnsmasq to serve up dhcpd requests.   
 dhcp-range=192.168.2.100,192.168.2.149,255.255.255.0,1440m   
 dhcp-option=option:netmask,255.255.255.0
 dhcp-option=option:time-offset,-18000
 dhcp-option=option:router,192.168.2.1
 dhcp-option=option:dns-server,192.168.2.99,192.168.2.99
 dhcp-authoritative
 # Address range for static network appliances
 dhcp-range=192.168.2.2,192.168.2.99,static,255.255.255.0 ,14400
 dhcp-host=00:e6:4c:88:25:7e,192.168.2.5,dcky-mythbuntu,14400
 dhcp-host=00:1a:4d:f6:77:bf,192.168.2.8,dcky-ubuntu-fedoraxp,14400
 dhcp-host=00:1b:b9:83:e6:98,192.168.2.98,hda,14400


and here's the relevant portions of the amahi config files *I'm not including the /etc/dnsmasq.conf file from the Amahi, because it's long and there isn't anything uncommented in it that I know of.
Code: Select all
[root@localhost dnsmasq.d]# cat amahi-common.conf
# WARNING: Automatically generated by hda-ctl on 2014-05-10 13:34:11
# Use /etc/hdactl.conf for defaults and add any customizations at the very end of /etc/dnsmasq.conf
# common configuration
no-resolv
no-poll
domain-needed
bogus-priv
expand-hosts
localise-queries

Code: Select all
[root@localhost dnsmasq.d]# cat amahi-dhcp.conf
# WARNING: Automatically generated by hda-ctl on 2014-05-10 13:34:11
# Use /etc/hdactl.conf for defaults and add any customizations at the very end of /etc/dnsmasq.conf
# DHCP configuration
dhcp-authoritative
dhcp-range=192.168.2.100,192.168.2.254,255.255.255.0,14400
dhcp-option=option:netmask,255.255.255.0
dhcp-option=option:time-offset,-18000
dhcp-option=option:router,192.168.2.1
dhcp-option=option:dns-server,192.168.2.98,192.168.2.98
dhcp-host=00:e6:4c:88:25:7e,192.168.2.5,dcky-mythbuntu,14400
dhcp-host=00:1a:4d:f6:77:bf,192.168.2.8,dcky-ubuntu-fedoraxp,14400

and
Code: Select all
cat amahi-dns.conf
# WARNING: Automatically generated by hda-ctl on 2014-05-10 13:34:11
# Use /etc/hdactl.conf for defaults and add any customizations at the very end of /etc/dnsmasq.conf
# DNS configuration
server=8.8.8.8
server=8.8.4.4
domain=local.lan
ptr-record=98.2.168.192.in-addr.arpa,hda.local.lan
address=/hda/hda.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/search/search.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/setup/setup.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/calendar/calendar.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/help/help.local.lan/192.168.2.98
ptr-record=1.2.168.192.in-addr.arpa,router.local.lan
address=/router/router.local.lan/192.168.2.1
address=/webmin/webmin.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/mythweb/mythweb.local.lan/192.168.2.98
address=/dcky-mythbuntu/dcky-mythbuntu.local.lan/192.168.2.5
address=/dcky-ubuntu-fedoraxp/dcky-ubuntu-fedoraxp.local.lan/192.168.2.8


Any help in getting things straight is greatly appreciated.
Have a great day.:)
Patrick.
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun May 11, 2014 6:44 am
by Yoda007 » Tue Mar 03, 2015 7:34 pm
I have a problem: The cache only works until I restart the service. I checked the configuration and the resolv.dnsmasq is not present. If i create the file (and change the owner to root) it is always empty, the same is if I use the default resolv.conf.

Another question: I tried measuring performance with DNS Benchmark and namebench and the pi server is always at the bottom (slow) even on the second run when the addresses should be cached. Whats up with that ?
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 6:05 pm
by stephendotexe » Tue Mar 03, 2015 8:33 pm
Yoda007 wrote:I have a problem: The cache only works until I restart the service. I checked the configuration and the resolv.dnsmasq is not present. If i create the file (and change the owner to root) it is always empty, the same is if I use the default resolv.conf.

Another question: I tried measuring performance with DNS Benchmark and namebench and the pi server is always at the bottom (slow) even on the second run when the addresses should be cached. Whats up with that ?


Could be a few reasons for both problems. Please paste your dnsmasq config so I can take a look, along with any results you're getting with namebench.
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 11:20 pm
by Yoda007 » Tue Mar 03, 2015 9:01 pm
The configuration file:
Code: Select all
# Configuration file for dnsmasq.
#
# Format is one option per line, legal options are the same
# as the long options legal on the command line. See
# "/usr/sbin/dnsmasq --help" or "man 8 dnsmasq" for details.

# Listen on this specific port instead of the standard DNS port
# (53). Setting this to zero completely disables DNS function,
# leaving only DHCP and/or TFTP.
#port=5353

# The following two options make you a better netizen, since they
# tell dnsmasq to filter out queries which the public DNS cannot
# answer, and which load the servers (especially the root servers)
# unnecessarily. If you have a dial-on-demand link they also stop
# these requests from bringing up the link unnecessarily.

# Never forward plain names (without a dot or domain part)
domain-needed
# Never forward addresses in the non-routed address spaces.
bogus-priv


# Uncomment this to filter useless windows-originated DNS requests
# which can trigger dial-on-demand links needlessly.
# Note that (amongst other things) this blocks all SRV requests,
# so don't use it if you use eg Kerberos, SIP, XMMP or Google-talk.
# This option only affects forwarding, SRV records originating for
# dnsmasq (via srv-host= lines) are not suppressed by it.
#filterwin2k

# Change this line if you want dns to get its upstream servers from
# somewhere other that /etc/resolv.conf
resolv-file=/etc/resolv.dnsmasq

# By  default,  dnsmasq  will  send queries to any of the upstream
# servers it knows about and tries to favour servers to are  known
# to  be  up.  Uncommenting this forces dnsmasq to try each query
# with  each  server  strictly  in  the  order  they   appear   in
# /etc/resolv.conf
#strict-order

# If you don't want dnsmasq to read /etc/resolv.conf or any other
# file, getting its servers from this file instead (see below), then
# uncomment this.
#no-resolv

# If you don't want dnsmasq to poll /etc/resolv.conf or other resolv
# files for changes and re-read them then uncomment this.
#no-poll

# Add other name servers here, with domain specs if they are for
# non-public domains.
#server=/localnet/192.168.0.1
server=8.8.4.4
server=8.8.8.8

# Example of routing PTR queries to nameservers: this will send all
# address->name queries for 192.168.3/24 to nameserver 10.1.2.3
#server=/3.168.192.in-addr.arpa/10.1.2.3

# Add local-only domains here, queries in these domains are answered
# from /etc/hosts or DHCP only.
#local=/localnet/

# Add domains which you want to force to an IP address here.
# The example below send any host in double-click.net to a local
# web-server.
#address=/double-click.net/127.0.0.1

# --address (and --server) work with IPv6 addresses too.
#address=/www.thekelleys.org.uk/fe80::20d:60ff:fe36:f83

# You can control how dnsmasq talks to a server: this forces
# queries to 10.1.2.3 to be routed via eth1
# server=10.1.2.3@eth1

# and this sets the source (ie local) address used to talk to
# 10.1.2.3 to 192.168.1.1 port 55 (there must be a interface with that
# IP on the machine, obviously).
# server=10.1.2.3@192.168.1.1#55

# If you want dnsmasq to change uid and gid to something other
# than the default, edit the following lines.
#user=
#group=

# If you want dnsmasq to listen for DHCP and DNS requests only on
# specified interfaces (and the loopback) give the name of the
# interface (eg eth0) here.
# Repeat the line for more than one interface.
interface= eth0
interface= lo
# Or you can specify which interface _not_ to listen on
#except-interface=
# Or which to listen on by address (remember to include 127.0.0.1 if
# you use this.)
listen-address=192.168.0.30
# If you want dnsmasq to provide only DNS service on an interface,
# configure it as shown above, and then use the following line to
# disable DHCP and TFTP on it.
#no-dhcp-interface=

# On systems which support it, dnsmasq binds the wildcard address,
# even when it is listening on only some interfaces. It then discards
# requests that it shouldn't reply to. This has the advantage of
# working even when interfaces come and go and change address. If you
# want dnsmasq to really bind only the interfaces it is listening on,
# uncomment this option. About the only time you may need this is when
# running another nameserver on the same machine.
#bind-interfaces

# If you don't want dnsmasq to read /etc/hosts, uncomment the
# following line.
#no-hosts
# or if you want it to read another file, as well as /etc/hosts, use
# this.
#addn-hosts=/etc/banner_add_hosts

# Set this (and domain: see below) if you want to have a domain
# automatically added to simple names in a hosts-file.
#expand-hosts

# Set the domain for dnsmasq. this is optional, but if it is set, it
# does the following things.
# 1) Allows DHCP hosts to have fully qualified domain names, as long
#     as the domain part matches this setting.
# 2) Sets the "domain" DHCP option thereby potentially setting the
#    domain of all systems configured by DHCP
# 3) Provides the domain part for "expand-hosts"
#domain=thekelleys.org.uk

# Set a different domain for a particular subnet
#domain=wireless.thekelleys.org.uk,192.168.2.0/24

# Same idea, but range rather then subnet
#domain=reserved.thekelleys.org.uk,192.68.3.100,192.168.3.200

# Uncomment this to enable the integrated DHCP server, you need
# to supply the range of addresses available for lease and optionally
# a lease time. If you have more than one network, you will need to
# repeat this for each network on which you want to supply DHCP
# service.
#dhcp-range=192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150,12h

# This is an example of a DHCP range where the netmask is given. This
# is needed for networks we reach the dnsmasq DHCP server via a relay
# agent. If you don't know what a DHCP relay agent is, you probably
# don't need to worry about this.
#dhcp-range=192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150,255.255.255.0,12h

# This is an example of a DHCP range which sets a tag, so that
# some DHCP options may be set only for this network.
#dhcp-range=set:red,192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150

# Use this DHCP range only when the tag "green" is set.
#dhcp-range=tag:green,192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150,12h

# Specify a subnet which can't be used for dynamic address allocation,
# is available for hosts with matching --dhcp-host lines. Note that
# dhcp-host declarations will be ignored unless there is a dhcp-range
# of some type for the subnet in question.
# In this case the netmask is implied (it comes from the network
# configuration on the machine running dnsmasq) it is possible to give
# an explicit netmask instead.
#dhcp-range=192.168.0.0,static

# Enable DHCPv6. Note that the prefix-length does not need to be specified
# and defaults to 64 if missing/
#dhcp-range=1234::2, 1234::500, 64, 12h

# Do Router Advertisements, BUT NOT DHCP for this subnet.
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-only

# Do Router Advertisements, BUT NOT DHCP for this subnet, also try and
# add names to the DNS for the IPv6 address of SLAAC-configured dual-stack
# hosts. Use the DHCPv4 lease to derive the name, network segment and
# MAC address and assume that the host will also have an
# IPv6 address calculated using the SLAAC alogrithm.
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-names

# Do Router Advertisements, BUT NOT DHCP for this subnet.
# Set the lifetime to 46 hours. (Note: minimum lifetime is 2 hours.)
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-only, 48h

# Do DHCP and Router Advertisements for this subnet. Set the A bit in the RA
# so that clients can use SLAAC addresses as well as DHCP ones.
#dhcp-range=1234::2, 1234::500, slaac

# Do Router Advertisements and stateless DHCP for this subnet. Clients will
# not get addresses from DHCP, but they will get other configuration information.
# They will use SLAAC for addresses.
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-stateless

# Do stateless DHCP, SLAAC, and generate DNS names for SLAAC addresses
# from DHCPv4 leases.
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-stateless, ra-names

# Do router advertisements for all subnets where we're doing DHCPv6
# Unless overriden by ra-stateless, ra-names, et al, the router
# advertisements will have the M and O bits set, so that the clients
# get addresses and configuration from DHCPv6, and the A bit reset, so the
# clients don't use SLAAC addresses.
#enable-ra

# Supply parameters for specified hosts using DHCP. There are lots
# of valid alternatives, so we will give examples of each. Note that
# IP addresses DO NOT have to be in the range given above, they just
# need to be on the same network. The order of the parameters in these
# do not matter, it's permissible to give name, address and MAC in any
# order.

# Always allocate the host with Ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
# The IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,192.168.0.60

# Always set the name of the host with hardware address
# 11:22:33:44:55:66 to be "fred"
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,fred

# Always give the host with Ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
# the name fred and IP address 192.168.0.60 and lease time 45 minutes
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,fred,192.168.0.60,45m

# Give a host with Ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66 or
# 12:34:56:78:90:12 the IP address 192.168.0.60. Dnsmasq will assume
# that these two Ethernet interfaces will never be in use at the same
# time, and give the IP address to the second, even if it is already
# in use by the first. Useful for laptops with wired and wireless
# addresses.
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,12:34:56:78:90:12,192.168.0.60

# Give the machine which says its name is "bert" IP address
# 192.168.0.70 and an infinite lease
#dhcp-host=bert,192.168.0.70,infinite

# Always give the host with client identifier 01:02:02:04
# the IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=id:01:02:02:04,192.168.0.60

# Always give the host with client identifier "marjorie"
# the IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=id:marjorie,192.168.0.60

# Enable the address given for "judge" in /etc/hosts
# to be given to a machine presenting the name "judge" when
# it asks for a DHCP lease.
#dhcp-host=judge

# Never offer DHCP service to a machine whose Ethernet
# address is 11:22:33:44:55:66
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,ignore

# Ignore any client-id presented by the machine with Ethernet
# address 11:22:33:44:55:66. This is useful to prevent a machine
# being treated differently when running under different OS's or
# between PXE boot and OS boot.
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,id:*

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to
# the machine with Ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,set:red

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to
# any machine with Ethernet address starting 11:22:33:
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:*:*:*,set:red

# Give a fixed IPv6 address and name to client with
# DUID 00:01:00:01:16:d2:83:fc:92:d4:19:e2:d8:b2
# Note the MAC addresses CANNOT be used to identify DHCPv6 clients.
# Note also the they [] around the IPv6 address are obilgatory.
#dhcp-host=id:00:01:00:01:16:d2:83:fc:92:d4:19:e2:d8:b2, fred, [1234::5]

# Ignore any clients which are not specified in dhcp-host lines
# or /etc/ethers. Equivalent to ISC "deny unknown-clients".
# This relies on the special "known" tag which is set when
# a host is matched.
#dhcp-ignore=tag:!known

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to any machine whose
# DHCP vendorclass string includes the substring "Linux"
#dhcp-vendorclass=set:red,Linux

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to any machine one
# of whose DHCP userclass strings includes the substring "accounts"
#dhcp-userclass=set:red,accounts

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to any machine whose
# MAC address matches the pattern.
#dhcp-mac=set:red,00:60:8C:*:*:*

# If this line is uncommented, dnsmasq will read /etc/ethers and act
# on the ethernet-address/IP pairs found there just as if they had
# been given as --dhcp-host options. Useful if you keep
# MAC-address/host mappings there for other purposes.
#read-ethers

# Send options to hosts which ask for a DHCP lease.
# See RFC 2132 for details of available options.
# Common options can be given to dnsmasq by name:
# run "dnsmasq --help dhcp" to get a list.
# Note that all the common settings, such as netmask and
# broadcast address, DNS server and default route, are given
# sane defaults by dnsmasq. You very likely will not need
# any dhcp-options. If you use Windows clients and Samba, there
# are some options which are recommended, they are detailed at the
# end of this section.

# Override the default route supplied by dnsmasq, which assumes the
# router is the same machine as the one running dnsmasq.
#dhcp-option=3,1.2.3.4

# Do the same thing, but using the option name
#dhcp-option=option:router,1.2.3.4

# Override the default route supplied by dnsmasq and send no default
# route at all. Note that this only works for the options sent by
# default (1, 3, 6, 12, 28) the same line will send a zero-length option
# for all other option numbers.
#dhcp-option=3

# Set the NTP time server addresses to 192.168.0.4 and 10.10.0.5
#dhcp-option=option:ntp-server,192.168.0.4,10.10.0.5

# Send DHCPv6 option. Note [] around IPv6 addresses.
#dhcp-option=option6:dns-server,[1234::77],[1234::88]

# Send DHCPv6 option for namservers as the machine running
# dnsmasq and another.
#dhcp-option=option6:dns-server,[::],[1234::88]

# Set the NTP time server address to be the same machine as
# is running dnsmasq
#dhcp-option=42,0.0.0.0

# Set the NIS domain name to "welly"
#dhcp-option=40,welly

# Set the default time-to-live to 50
#dhcp-option=23,50

# Set the "all subnets are local" flag
#dhcp-option=27,1

# Send the etherboot magic flag and then etherboot options (a string).
#dhcp-option=128,e4:45:74:68:00:00
#dhcp-option=129,NIC=eepro100

# Specify an option which will only be sent to the "red" network
# (see dhcp-range for the declaration of the "red" network)
# Note that the tag: part must precede the option: part.
#dhcp-option = tag:red, option:ntp-server, 192.168.1.1

# The following DHCP options set up dnsmasq in the same way as is specified
# for the ISC dhcpcd in
# http://www.samba.org/samba/ftp/docs/textdocs/DHCP-Server-Configuration.txt
# adapted for a typical dnsmasq installation where the host running
# dnsmasq is also the host running samba.
# you may want to uncomment some or all of them if you use
# Windows clients and Samba.
#dhcp-option=19,0           # option ip-forwarding off
#dhcp-option=44,0.0.0.0     # set netbios-over-TCP/IP nameserver(s) aka WINS server(s)
#dhcp-option=45,0.0.0.0     # netbios datagram distribution server
#dhcp-option=46,8           # netbios node type

# Send an empty WPAD option. This may be REQUIRED to get windows 7 to behave.
#dhcp-option=252,"\n"

# Send RFC-3397 DNS domain search DHCP option. WARNING: Your DHCP client
# probably doesn't support this......
#dhcp-option=option:domain-search,eng.apple.com,marketing.apple.com

# Send RFC-3442 classless static routes (note the netmask encoding)
#dhcp-option=121,192.168.1.0/24,1.2.3.4,10.0.0.0/8,5.6.7.8

# Send vendor-class specific options encapsulated in DHCP option 43.
# The meaning of the options is defined by the vendor-class so
# options are sent only when the client supplied vendor class
# matches the class given here. (A substring match is OK, so "MSFT"
# matches "MSFT" and "MSFT 5.0"). This example sets the
# mtftp address to 0.0.0.0 for PXEClients.
#dhcp-option=vendor:PXEClient,1,0.0.0.0

# Send microsoft-specific option to tell windows to release the DHCP lease
# when it shuts down. Note the "i" flag, to tell dnsmasq to send the
# value as a four-byte integer - that's what microsoft wants. See
# http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/a70f1bb7-d2d4-49f0-96d6-4b7414ecfaae1033.mspx?mfr=true
#dhcp-option=vendor:MSFT,2,1i

# Send the Encapsulated-vendor-class ID needed by some configurations of
# Etherboot to allow is to recognise the DHCP server.
#dhcp-option=vendor:Etherboot,60,"Etherboot"

# Send options to PXELinux. Note that we need to send the options even
# though they don't appear in the parameter request list, so we need
# to use dhcp-option-force here.
# See http://syslinux.zytor.com/pxe.php#special for details.
# Magic number - needed before anything else is recognised
#dhcp-option-force=208,f1:00:74:7e
# Configuration file name
#dhcp-option-force=209,configs/common
# Path prefix
#dhcp-option-force=210,/tftpboot/pxelinux/files/
# Reboot time. (Note 'i' to send 32-bit value)
#dhcp-option-force=211,30i

# Set the boot filename for netboot/PXE. You will only need
# this is you want to boot machines over the network and you will need
# a TFTP server; either dnsmasq's built in TFTP server or an
# external one. (See below for how to enable the TFTP server.)
#dhcp-boot=pxelinux.0

# The same as above, but use custom tftp-server instead machine running dnsmasq
#dhcp-boot=pxelinux,server.name,192.168.1.100

# Boot for Etherboot gPXE. The idea is to send two different
# filenames, the first loads gPXE, and the second tells gPXE what to
# load. The dhcp-match sets the gpxe tag for requests from gPXE.
#dhcp-match=set:gpxe,175 # gPXE sends a 175 option.
#dhcp-boot=tag:!gpxe,undionly.kpxe
#dhcp-boot=mybootimage

# Encapsulated options for Etherboot gPXE. All the options are
# encapsulated within option 175
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 1, 5b         # priority code
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 176, 1b       # no-proxydhcp
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 177, string   # bus-id
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 189, 1b       # BIOS drive code
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 190, user     # iSCSI username
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 191, pass     # iSCSI password

# Test for the architecture of a netboot client. PXE clients are
# supposed to send their architecture as option 93. (See RFC 4578)
#dhcp-match=peecees, option:client-arch, 0 #x86-32
#dhcp-match=itanics, option:client-arch, 2 #IA64
#dhcp-match=hammers, option:client-arch, 6 #x86-64
#dhcp-match=mactels, option:client-arch, 7 #EFI x86-64

# Do real PXE, rather than just booting a single file, this is an
# alternative to dhcp-boot.
#pxe-prompt="What system shall I netboot?"
# or with timeout before first available action is taken:
#pxe-prompt="Press F8 for menu.", 60

# Available boot services. for PXE.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Boot from local disk"

# Loads <tftp-root>/pxelinux.0 from dnsmasq TFTP server.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Install Linux", pxelinux

# Loads <tftp-root>/pxelinux.0 from TFTP server at 1.2.3.4.
# Beware this fails on old PXE ROMS.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Install Linux", pxelinux, 1.2.3.4

# Use bootserver on network, found my multicast or broadcast.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Install windows from RIS server", 1

# Use bootserver at a known IP address.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Install windows from RIS server", 1, 1.2.3.4

# If you have multicast-FTP available,
# information for that can be passed in a similar way using options 1
# to 5. See page 19 of
# http://download.intel.com/design/archives/wfm/downloads/pxespec.pdf


# Enable dnsmasq's built-in TFTP server
#enable-tftp

# Set the root directory for files available via FTP.
#tftp-root=/var/ftpd

# Make the TFTP server more secure: with this set, only files owned by
# the user dnsmasq is running as will be send over the net.
#tftp-secure

# This option stops dnsmasq from negotiating a larger blocksize for TFTP
# transfers. It will slow things down, but may rescue some broken TFTP
# clients.
#tftp-no-blocksize

# Set the boot file name only when the "red" tag is set.
#dhcp-boot=net:red,pxelinux.red-net

# An example of dhcp-boot with an external TFTP server: the name and IP
# address of the server are given after the filename.
# Can fail with old PXE ROMS. Overridden by --pxe-service.
#dhcp-boot=/var/ftpd/pxelinux.0,boothost,192.168.0.3

# If there are multiple external tftp servers having a same name
# (using /etc/hosts) then that name can be specified as the
# tftp_servername (the third option to dhcp-boot) and in that
# case dnsmasq resolves this name and returns the resultant IP
# addresses in round robin fasion. This facility can be used to
# load balance the tftp load among a set of servers.
#dhcp-boot=/var/ftpd/pxelinux.0,boothost,tftp_server_name

# Set the limit on DHCP leases, the default is 150
#dhcp-lease-max=150

# The DHCP server needs somewhere on disk to keep its lease database.
# This defaults to a sane location, but if you want to change it, use
# the line below.
#dhcp-leasefile=/var/lib/misc/dnsmasq.leases

# Set the DHCP server to authoritative mode. In this mode it will barge in
# and take over the lease for any client which broadcasts on the network,
# whether it has a record of the lease or not. This avoids long timeouts
# when a machine wakes up on a new network. DO NOT enable this if there's
# the slightest chance that you might end up accidentally configuring a DHCP
# server for your campus/company accidentally. The ISC server uses
# the same option, and this URL provides more information:
# http://www.isc.org/files/auth.html
#dhcp-authoritative

# Run an executable when a DHCP lease is created or destroyed.
# The arguments sent to the script are "add" or "del",
# then the MAC address, the IP address and finally the hostname
# if there is one.
#dhcp-script=/bin/echo

# Set the cachesize here.
cache-size=10000

# If you want to disable negative caching, uncomment this.
#no-negcache

# Normally responses which come form /etc/hosts and the DHCP lease
# file have Time-To-Live set as zero, which conventionally means
# do not cache further. If you are happy to trade lower load on the
# server for potentially stale date, you can set a time-to-live (in
# seconds) here.
#local-ttl=

# If you want dnsmasq to detect attempts by Verisign to send queries
# to unregistered .com and .net hosts to its sitefinder service and
# have dnsmasq instead return the correct NXDOMAIN response, uncomment
# this line. You can add similar lines to do the same for other
# registries which have implemented wildcard A records.
#bogus-nxdomain=64.94.110.11

# If you want to fix up DNS results from upstream servers, use the
# alias option. This only works for IPv4.
# This alias makes a result of 1.2.3.4 appear as 5.6.7.8
#alias=1.2.3.4,5.6.7.8
# and this maps 1.2.3.x to 5.6.7.x
#alias=1.2.3.0,5.6.7.0,255.255.255.0
# and this maps 192.168.0.10->192.168.0.40 to 10.0.0.10->10.0.0.40
#alias=192.168.0.10-192.168.0.40,10.0.0.0,255.255.255.0

# Change these lines if you want dnsmasq to serve MX records.

# Return an MX record named "maildomain.com" with target
# servermachine.com and preference 50
#mx-host=maildomain.com,servermachine.com,50

# Set the default target for MX records created using the localmx option.
#mx-target=servermachine.com

# Return an MX record pointing to the mx-target for all local
# machines.
#localmx

# Return an MX record pointing to itself for all local machines.
#selfmx

# Change the following lines if you want dnsmasq to serve SRV
# records.  These are useful if you want to serve ldap requests for
# Active Directory and other windows-originated DNS requests.
# See RFC 2782.
# You may add multiple srv-host lines.
# The fields are <name>,<target>,<port>,<priority>,<weight>
# If the domain part if missing from the name (so that is just has the
# service and protocol sections) then the domain given by the domain=
# config option is used. (Note that expand-hosts does not need to be
# set for this to work.)

# A SRV record sending LDAP for the example.com domain to
# ldapserver.example.com port 389
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389

# A SRV record sending LDAP for the example.com domain to
# ldapserver.example.com port 389 (using domain=)
#domain=example.com
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp,ldapserver.example.com,389

# Two SRV records for LDAP, each with different priorities
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389,1
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389,2

# A SRV record indicating that there is no LDAP server for the domain
# example.com
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com

# The following line shows how to make dnsmasq serve an arbitrary PTR
# record. This is useful for DNS-SD. (Note that the
# domain-name expansion done for SRV records _does_not
# occur for PTR records.)
#ptr-record=_http._tcp.dns-sd-services,"New Employee Page._http._tcp.dns-sd-services"

# Change the following lines to enable dnsmasq to serve TXT records.
# These are used for things like SPF and zeroconf. (Note that the
# domain-name expansion done for SRV records _does_not
# occur for TXT records.)

#Example SPF.
#txt-record=example.com,"v=spf1 a -all"

#Example zeroconf
#txt-record=_http._tcp.example.com,name=value,paper=A4

# Provide an alias for a "local" DNS name. Note that this _only_ works
# for targets which are names from DHCP or /etc/hosts. Give host
# "bert" another name, bertrand
#cname=bertand,bert

# For debugging purposes, log each DNS query as it passes through
# dnsmasq.
#log-queries

# Log lots of extra information about DHCP transactions.
#log-dhcp

# Include a another lot of configuration options.
#conf-file=/etc/dnsmasq.more.conf
#conf-dir=/etc/dnsmasq.d



Will post namebench results when it finishes (closed previous results).
Results are here (192.168.0.1 router is set to my pi DNS): http://filebin.ca/1tahhgHFs5CH/namebench_2015-03-03_2226.html
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 6:05 pm
by stephendotexe » Tue Mar 03, 2015 9:44 pm
Yoda007 wrote:The configuration file:
Code: Select all
# Configuration file for dnsmasq.
#
# Format is one option per line, legal options are the same
# as the long options legal on the command line. See
# "/usr/sbin/dnsmasq --help" or "man 8 dnsmasq" for details.

# Listen on this specific port instead of the standard DNS port
# (53). Setting this to zero completely disables DNS function,
# leaving only DHCP and/or TFTP.
#port=5353

# The following two options make you a better netizen, since they
# tell dnsmasq to filter out queries which the public DNS cannot
# answer, and which load the servers (especially the root servers)
# unnecessarily. If you have a dial-on-demand link they also stop
# these requests from bringing up the link unnecessarily.

# Never forward plain names (without a dot or domain part)
domain-needed
# Never forward addresses in the non-routed address spaces.
bogus-priv


# Uncomment this to filter useless windows-originated DNS requests
# which can trigger dial-on-demand links needlessly.
# Note that (amongst other things) this blocks all SRV requests,
# so don't use it if you use eg Kerberos, SIP, XMMP or Google-talk.
# This option only affects forwarding, SRV records originating for
# dnsmasq (via srv-host= lines) are not suppressed by it.
#filterwin2k

# Change this line if you want dns to get its upstream servers from
# somewhere other that /etc/resolv.conf
resolv-file=/etc/resolv.dnsmasq

# By  default,  dnsmasq  will  send queries to any of the upstream
# servers it knows about and tries to favour servers to are  known
# to  be  up.  Uncommenting this forces dnsmasq to try each query
# with  each  server  strictly  in  the  order  they   appear   in
# /etc/resolv.conf
#strict-order

# If you don't want dnsmasq to read /etc/resolv.conf or any other
# file, getting its servers from this file instead (see below), then
# uncomment this.
#no-resolv

# If you don't want dnsmasq to poll /etc/resolv.conf or other resolv
# files for changes and re-read them then uncomment this.
#no-poll

# Add other name servers here, with domain specs if they are for
# non-public domains.
#server=/localnet/192.168.0.1
server=8.8.4.4
server=8.8.8.8

# Example of routing PTR queries to nameservers: this will send all
# address->name queries for 192.168.3/24 to nameserver 10.1.2.3
#server=/3.168.192.in-addr.arpa/10.1.2.3

# Add local-only domains here, queries in these domains are answered
# from /etc/hosts or DHCP only.
#local=/localnet/

# Add domains which you want to force to an IP address here.
# The example below send any host in double-click.net to a local
# web-server.
#address=/double-click.net/127.0.0.1

# --address (and --server) work with IPv6 addresses too.
#address=/www.thekelleys.org.uk/fe80::20d:60ff:fe36:f83

# You can control how dnsmasq talks to a server: this forces
# queries to 10.1.2.3 to be routed via eth1
# server=10.1.2.3@eth1

# and this sets the source (ie local) address used to talk to
# 10.1.2.3 to 192.168.1.1 port 55 (there must be a interface with that
# IP on the machine, obviously).
# server=10.1.2.3@192.168.1.1#55

# If you want dnsmasq to change uid and gid to something other
# than the default, edit the following lines.
#user=
#group=

# If you want dnsmasq to listen for DHCP and DNS requests only on
# specified interfaces (and the loopback) give the name of the
# interface (eg eth0) here.
# Repeat the line for more than one interface.
interface= eth0
interface= lo
# Or you can specify which interface _not_ to listen on
#except-interface=
# Or which to listen on by address (remember to include 127.0.0.1 if
# you use this.)
listen-address=192.168.0.30
# If you want dnsmasq to provide only DNS service on an interface,
# configure it as shown above, and then use the following line to
# disable DHCP and TFTP on it.
#no-dhcp-interface=

# On systems which support it, dnsmasq binds the wildcard address,
# even when it is listening on only some interfaces. It then discards
# requests that it shouldn't reply to. This has the advantage of
# working even when interfaces come and go and change address. If you
# want dnsmasq to really bind only the interfaces it is listening on,
# uncomment this option. About the only time you may need this is when
# running another nameserver on the same machine.
#bind-interfaces

# If you don't want dnsmasq to read /etc/hosts, uncomment the
# following line.
#no-hosts
# or if you want it to read another file, as well as /etc/hosts, use
# this.
#addn-hosts=/etc/banner_add_hosts

# Set this (and domain: see below) if you want to have a domain
# automatically added to simple names in a hosts-file.
#expand-hosts

# Set the domain for dnsmasq. this is optional, but if it is set, it
# does the following things.
# 1) Allows DHCP hosts to have fully qualified domain names, as long
#     as the domain part matches this setting.
# 2) Sets the "domain" DHCP option thereby potentially setting the
#    domain of all systems configured by DHCP
# 3) Provides the domain part for "expand-hosts"
#domain=thekelleys.org.uk

# Set a different domain for a particular subnet
#domain=wireless.thekelleys.org.uk,192.168.2.0/24

# Same idea, but range rather then subnet
#domain=reserved.thekelleys.org.uk,192.68.3.100,192.168.3.200

# Uncomment this to enable the integrated DHCP server, you need
# to supply the range of addresses available for lease and optionally
# a lease time. If you have more than one network, you will need to
# repeat this for each network on which you want to supply DHCP
# service.
#dhcp-range=192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150,12h

# This is an example of a DHCP range where the netmask is given. This
# is needed for networks we reach the dnsmasq DHCP server via a relay
# agent. If you don't know what a DHCP relay agent is, you probably
# don't need to worry about this.
#dhcp-range=192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150,255.255.255.0,12h

# This is an example of a DHCP range which sets a tag, so that
# some DHCP options may be set only for this network.
#dhcp-range=set:red,192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150

# Use this DHCP range only when the tag "green" is set.
#dhcp-range=tag:green,192.168.0.50,192.168.0.150,12h

# Specify a subnet which can't be used for dynamic address allocation,
# is available for hosts with matching --dhcp-host lines. Note that
# dhcp-host declarations will be ignored unless there is a dhcp-range
# of some type for the subnet in question.
# In this case the netmask is implied (it comes from the network
# configuration on the machine running dnsmasq) it is possible to give
# an explicit netmask instead.
#dhcp-range=192.168.0.0,static

# Enable DHCPv6. Note that the prefix-length does not need to be specified
# and defaults to 64 if missing/
#dhcp-range=1234::2, 1234::500, 64, 12h

# Do Router Advertisements, BUT NOT DHCP for this subnet.
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-only

# Do Router Advertisements, BUT NOT DHCP for this subnet, also try and
# add names to the DNS for the IPv6 address of SLAAC-configured dual-stack
# hosts. Use the DHCPv4 lease to derive the name, network segment and
# MAC address and assume that the host will also have an
# IPv6 address calculated using the SLAAC alogrithm.
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-names

# Do Router Advertisements, BUT NOT DHCP for this subnet.
# Set the lifetime to 46 hours. (Note: minimum lifetime is 2 hours.)
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-only, 48h

# Do DHCP and Router Advertisements for this subnet. Set the A bit in the RA
# so that clients can use SLAAC addresses as well as DHCP ones.
#dhcp-range=1234::2, 1234::500, slaac

# Do Router Advertisements and stateless DHCP for this subnet. Clients will
# not get addresses from DHCP, but they will get other configuration information.
# They will use SLAAC for addresses.
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-stateless

# Do stateless DHCP, SLAAC, and generate DNS names for SLAAC addresses
# from DHCPv4 leases.
#dhcp-range=1234::, ra-stateless, ra-names

# Do router advertisements for all subnets where we're doing DHCPv6
# Unless overriden by ra-stateless, ra-names, et al, the router
# advertisements will have the M and O bits set, so that the clients
# get addresses and configuration from DHCPv6, and the A bit reset, so the
# clients don't use SLAAC addresses.
#enable-ra

# Supply parameters for specified hosts using DHCP. There are lots
# of valid alternatives, so we will give examples of each. Note that
# IP addresses DO NOT have to be in the range given above, they just
# need to be on the same network. The order of the parameters in these
# do not matter, it's permissible to give name, address and MAC in any
# order.

# Always allocate the host with Ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
# The IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,192.168.0.60

# Always set the name of the host with hardware address
# 11:22:33:44:55:66 to be "fred"
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,fred

# Always give the host with Ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
# the name fred and IP address 192.168.0.60 and lease time 45 minutes
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,fred,192.168.0.60,45m

# Give a host with Ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66 or
# 12:34:56:78:90:12 the IP address 192.168.0.60. Dnsmasq will assume
# that these two Ethernet interfaces will never be in use at the same
# time, and give the IP address to the second, even if it is already
# in use by the first. Useful for laptops with wired and wireless
# addresses.
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,12:34:56:78:90:12,192.168.0.60

# Give the machine which says its name is "bert" IP address
# 192.168.0.70 and an infinite lease
#dhcp-host=bert,192.168.0.70,infinite

# Always give the host with client identifier 01:02:02:04
# the IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=id:01:02:02:04,192.168.0.60

# Always give the host with client identifier "marjorie"
# the IP address 192.168.0.60
#dhcp-host=id:marjorie,192.168.0.60

# Enable the address given for "judge" in /etc/hosts
# to be given to a machine presenting the name "judge" when
# it asks for a DHCP lease.
#dhcp-host=judge

# Never offer DHCP service to a machine whose Ethernet
# address is 11:22:33:44:55:66
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,ignore

# Ignore any client-id presented by the machine with Ethernet
# address 11:22:33:44:55:66. This is useful to prevent a machine
# being treated differently when running under different OS's or
# between PXE boot and OS boot.
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,id:*

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to
# the machine with Ethernet address 11:22:33:44:55:66
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:44:55:66,set:red

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to
# any machine with Ethernet address starting 11:22:33:
#dhcp-host=11:22:33:*:*:*,set:red

# Give a fixed IPv6 address and name to client with
# DUID 00:01:00:01:16:d2:83:fc:92:d4:19:e2:d8:b2
# Note the MAC addresses CANNOT be used to identify DHCPv6 clients.
# Note also the they [] around the IPv6 address are obilgatory.
#dhcp-host=id:00:01:00:01:16:d2:83:fc:92:d4:19:e2:d8:b2, fred, [1234::5]

# Ignore any clients which are not specified in dhcp-host lines
# or /etc/ethers. Equivalent to ISC "deny unknown-clients".
# This relies on the special "known" tag which is set when
# a host is matched.
#dhcp-ignore=tag:!known

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to any machine whose
# DHCP vendorclass string includes the substring "Linux"
#dhcp-vendorclass=set:red,Linux

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to any machine one
# of whose DHCP userclass strings includes the substring "accounts"
#dhcp-userclass=set:red,accounts

# Send extra options which are tagged as "red" to any machine whose
# MAC address matches the pattern.
#dhcp-mac=set:red,00:60:8C:*:*:*

# If this line is uncommented, dnsmasq will read /etc/ethers and act
# on the ethernet-address/IP pairs found there just as if they had
# been given as --dhcp-host options. Useful if you keep
# MAC-address/host mappings there for other purposes.
#read-ethers

# Send options to hosts which ask for a DHCP lease.
# See RFC 2132 for details of available options.
# Common options can be given to dnsmasq by name:
# run "dnsmasq --help dhcp" to get a list.
# Note that all the common settings, such as netmask and
# broadcast address, DNS server and default route, are given
# sane defaults by dnsmasq. You very likely will not need
# any dhcp-options. If you use Windows clients and Samba, there
# are some options which are recommended, they are detailed at the
# end of this section.

# Override the default route supplied by dnsmasq, which assumes the
# router is the same machine as the one running dnsmasq.
#dhcp-option=3,1.2.3.4

# Do the same thing, but using the option name
#dhcp-option=option:router,1.2.3.4

# Override the default route supplied by dnsmasq and send no default
# route at all. Note that this only works for the options sent by
# default (1, 3, 6, 12, 28) the same line will send a zero-length option
# for all other option numbers.
#dhcp-option=3

# Set the NTP time server addresses to 192.168.0.4 and 10.10.0.5
#dhcp-option=option:ntp-server,192.168.0.4,10.10.0.5

# Send DHCPv6 option. Note [] around IPv6 addresses.
#dhcp-option=option6:dns-server,[1234::77],[1234::88]

# Send DHCPv6 option for namservers as the machine running
# dnsmasq and another.
#dhcp-option=option6:dns-server,[::],[1234::88]

# Set the NTP time server address to be the same machine as
# is running dnsmasq
#dhcp-option=42,0.0.0.0

# Set the NIS domain name to "welly"
#dhcp-option=40,welly

# Set the default time-to-live to 50
#dhcp-option=23,50

# Set the "all subnets are local" flag
#dhcp-option=27,1

# Send the etherboot magic flag and then etherboot options (a string).
#dhcp-option=128,e4:45:74:68:00:00
#dhcp-option=129,NIC=eepro100

# Specify an option which will only be sent to the "red" network
# (see dhcp-range for the declaration of the "red" network)
# Note that the tag: part must precede the option: part.
#dhcp-option = tag:red, option:ntp-server, 192.168.1.1

# The following DHCP options set up dnsmasq in the same way as is specified
# for the ISC dhcpcd in
# http://www.samba.org/samba/ftp/docs/textdocs/DHCP-Server-Configuration.txt
# adapted for a typical dnsmasq installation where the host running
# dnsmasq is also the host running samba.
# you may want to uncomment some or all of them if you use
# Windows clients and Samba.
#dhcp-option=19,0           # option ip-forwarding off
#dhcp-option=44,0.0.0.0     # set netbios-over-TCP/IP nameserver(s) aka WINS server(s)
#dhcp-option=45,0.0.0.0     # netbios datagram distribution server
#dhcp-option=46,8           # netbios node type

# Send an empty WPAD option. This may be REQUIRED to get windows 7 to behave.
#dhcp-option=252,"\n"

# Send RFC-3397 DNS domain search DHCP option. WARNING: Your DHCP client
# probably doesn't support this......
#dhcp-option=option:domain-search,eng.apple.com,marketing.apple.com

# Send RFC-3442 classless static routes (note the netmask encoding)
#dhcp-option=121,192.168.1.0/24,1.2.3.4,10.0.0.0/8,5.6.7.8

# Send vendor-class specific options encapsulated in DHCP option 43.
# The meaning of the options is defined by the vendor-class so
# options are sent only when the client supplied vendor class
# matches the class given here. (A substring match is OK, so "MSFT"
# matches "MSFT" and "MSFT 5.0"). This example sets the
# mtftp address to 0.0.0.0 for PXEClients.
#dhcp-option=vendor:PXEClient,1,0.0.0.0

# Send microsoft-specific option to tell windows to release the DHCP lease
# when it shuts down. Note the "i" flag, to tell dnsmasq to send the
# value as a four-byte integer - that's what microsoft wants. See
# http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/library/a70f1bb7-d2d4-49f0-96d6-4b7414ecfaae1033.mspx?mfr=true
#dhcp-option=vendor:MSFT,2,1i

# Send the Encapsulated-vendor-class ID needed by some configurations of
# Etherboot to allow is to recognise the DHCP server.
#dhcp-option=vendor:Etherboot,60,"Etherboot"

# Send options to PXELinux. Note that we need to send the options even
# though they don't appear in the parameter request list, so we need
# to use dhcp-option-force here.
# See http://syslinux.zytor.com/pxe.php#special for details.
# Magic number - needed before anything else is recognised
#dhcp-option-force=208,f1:00:74:7e
# Configuration file name
#dhcp-option-force=209,configs/common
# Path prefix
#dhcp-option-force=210,/tftpboot/pxelinux/files/
# Reboot time. (Note 'i' to send 32-bit value)
#dhcp-option-force=211,30i

# Set the boot filename for netboot/PXE. You will only need
# this is you want to boot machines over the network and you will need
# a TFTP server; either dnsmasq's built in TFTP server or an
# external one. (See below for how to enable the TFTP server.)
#dhcp-boot=pxelinux.0

# The same as above, but use custom tftp-server instead machine running dnsmasq
#dhcp-boot=pxelinux,server.name,192.168.1.100

# Boot for Etherboot gPXE. The idea is to send two different
# filenames, the first loads gPXE, and the second tells gPXE what to
# load. The dhcp-match sets the gpxe tag for requests from gPXE.
#dhcp-match=set:gpxe,175 # gPXE sends a 175 option.
#dhcp-boot=tag:!gpxe,undionly.kpxe
#dhcp-boot=mybootimage

# Encapsulated options for Etherboot gPXE. All the options are
# encapsulated within option 175
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 1, 5b         # priority code
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 176, 1b       # no-proxydhcp
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 177, string   # bus-id
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 189, 1b       # BIOS drive code
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 190, user     # iSCSI username
#dhcp-option=encap:175, 191, pass     # iSCSI password

# Test for the architecture of a netboot client. PXE clients are
# supposed to send their architecture as option 93. (See RFC 4578)
#dhcp-match=peecees, option:client-arch, 0 #x86-32
#dhcp-match=itanics, option:client-arch, 2 #IA64
#dhcp-match=hammers, option:client-arch, 6 #x86-64
#dhcp-match=mactels, option:client-arch, 7 #EFI x86-64

# Do real PXE, rather than just booting a single file, this is an
# alternative to dhcp-boot.
#pxe-prompt="What system shall I netboot?"
# or with timeout before first available action is taken:
#pxe-prompt="Press F8 for menu.", 60

# Available boot services. for PXE.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Boot from local disk"

# Loads <tftp-root>/pxelinux.0 from dnsmasq TFTP server.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Install Linux", pxelinux

# Loads <tftp-root>/pxelinux.0 from TFTP server at 1.2.3.4.
# Beware this fails on old PXE ROMS.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Install Linux", pxelinux, 1.2.3.4

# Use bootserver on network, found my multicast or broadcast.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Install windows from RIS server", 1

# Use bootserver at a known IP address.
#pxe-service=x86PC, "Install windows from RIS server", 1, 1.2.3.4

# If you have multicast-FTP available,
# information for that can be passed in a similar way using options 1
# to 5. See page 19 of
# http://download.intel.com/design/archives/wfm/downloads/pxespec.pdf


# Enable dnsmasq's built-in TFTP server
#enable-tftp

# Set the root directory for files available via FTP.
#tftp-root=/var/ftpd

# Make the TFTP server more secure: with this set, only files owned by
# the user dnsmasq is running as will be send over the net.
#tftp-secure

# This option stops dnsmasq from negotiating a larger blocksize for TFTP
# transfers. It will slow things down, but may rescue some broken TFTP
# clients.
#tftp-no-blocksize

# Set the boot file name only when the "red" tag is set.
#dhcp-boot=net:red,pxelinux.red-net

# An example of dhcp-boot with an external TFTP server: the name and IP
# address of the server are given after the filename.
# Can fail with old PXE ROMS. Overridden by --pxe-service.
#dhcp-boot=/var/ftpd/pxelinux.0,boothost,192.168.0.3

# If there are multiple external tftp servers having a same name
# (using /etc/hosts) then that name can be specified as the
# tftp_servername (the third option to dhcp-boot) and in that
# case dnsmasq resolves this name and returns the resultant IP
# addresses in round robin fasion. This facility can be used to
# load balance the tftp load among a set of servers.
#dhcp-boot=/var/ftpd/pxelinux.0,boothost,tftp_server_name

# Set the limit on DHCP leases, the default is 150
#dhcp-lease-max=150

# The DHCP server needs somewhere on disk to keep its lease database.
# This defaults to a sane location, but if you want to change it, use
# the line below.
#dhcp-leasefile=/var/lib/misc/dnsmasq.leases

# Set the DHCP server to authoritative mode. In this mode it will barge in
# and take over the lease for any client which broadcasts on the network,
# whether it has a record of the lease or not. This avoids long timeouts
# when a machine wakes up on a new network. DO NOT enable this if there's
# the slightest chance that you might end up accidentally configuring a DHCP
# server for your campus/company accidentally. The ISC server uses
# the same option, and this URL provides more information:
# http://www.isc.org/files/auth.html
#dhcp-authoritative

# Run an executable when a DHCP lease is created or destroyed.
# The arguments sent to the script are "add" or "del",
# then the MAC address, the IP address and finally the hostname
# if there is one.
#dhcp-script=/bin/echo

# Set the cachesize here.
cache-size=10000

# If you want to disable negative caching, uncomment this.
#no-negcache

# Normally responses which come form /etc/hosts and the DHCP lease
# file have Time-To-Live set as zero, which conventionally means
# do not cache further. If you are happy to trade lower load on the
# server for potentially stale date, you can set a time-to-live (in
# seconds) here.
#local-ttl=

# If you want dnsmasq to detect attempts by Verisign to send queries
# to unregistered .com and .net hosts to its sitefinder service and
# have dnsmasq instead return the correct NXDOMAIN response, uncomment
# this line. You can add similar lines to do the same for other
# registries which have implemented wildcard A records.
#bogus-nxdomain=64.94.110.11

# If you want to fix up DNS results from upstream servers, use the
# alias option. This only works for IPv4.
# This alias makes a result of 1.2.3.4 appear as 5.6.7.8
#alias=1.2.3.4,5.6.7.8
# and this maps 1.2.3.x to 5.6.7.x
#alias=1.2.3.0,5.6.7.0,255.255.255.0
# and this maps 192.168.0.10->192.168.0.40 to 10.0.0.10->10.0.0.40
#alias=192.168.0.10-192.168.0.40,10.0.0.0,255.255.255.0

# Change these lines if you want dnsmasq to serve MX records.

# Return an MX record named "maildomain.com" with target
# servermachine.com and preference 50
#mx-host=maildomain.com,servermachine.com,50

# Set the default target for MX records created using the localmx option.
#mx-target=servermachine.com

# Return an MX record pointing to the mx-target for all local
# machines.
#localmx

# Return an MX record pointing to itself for all local machines.
#selfmx

# Change the following lines if you want dnsmasq to serve SRV
# records.  These are useful if you want to serve ldap requests for
# Active Directory and other windows-originated DNS requests.
# See RFC 2782.
# You may add multiple srv-host lines.
# The fields are <name>,<target>,<port>,<priority>,<weight>
# If the domain part if missing from the name (so that is just has the
# service and protocol sections) then the domain given by the domain=
# config option is used. (Note that expand-hosts does not need to be
# set for this to work.)

# A SRV record sending LDAP for the example.com domain to
# ldapserver.example.com port 389
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389

# A SRV record sending LDAP for the example.com domain to
# ldapserver.example.com port 389 (using domain=)
#domain=example.com
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp,ldapserver.example.com,389

# Two SRV records for LDAP, each with different priorities
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389,1
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com,ldapserver.example.com,389,2

# A SRV record indicating that there is no LDAP server for the domain
# example.com
#srv-host=_ldap._tcp.example.com

# The following line shows how to make dnsmasq serve an arbitrary PTR
# record. This is useful for DNS-SD. (Note that the
# domain-name expansion done for SRV records _does_not
# occur for PTR records.)
#ptr-record=_http._tcp.dns-sd-services,"New Employee Page._http._tcp.dns-sd-services"

# Change the following lines to enable dnsmasq to serve TXT records.
# These are used for things like SPF and zeroconf. (Note that the
# domain-name expansion done for SRV records _does_not
# occur for TXT records.)

#Example SPF.
#txt-record=example.com,"v=spf1 a -all"

#Example zeroconf
#txt-record=_http._tcp.example.com,name=value,paper=A4

# Provide an alias for a "local" DNS name. Note that this _only_ works
# for targets which are names from DHCP or /etc/hosts. Give host
# "bert" another name, bertrand
#cname=bertand,bert

# For debugging purposes, log each DNS query as it passes through
# dnsmasq.
#log-queries

# Log lots of extra information about DHCP transactions.
#log-dhcp

# Include a another lot of configuration options.
#conf-file=/etc/dnsmasq.more.conf
#conf-dir=/etc/dnsmasq.d



Will post namebench results when it finishes (closed previous results).
Results are here (192.168.0.1 router is set to my pi DNS): http://filebin.ca/1tahhgHFs5CH/namebench_2015-03-03_2226.html


I would recommend commenting-out the line that specifies "/etc/dnsmasq.resolv" and attempting to restart the server.
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Jun 01, 2013 11:20 pm
by Yoda007 » Wed Mar 04, 2015 6:01 am
Already tried it still the same result - nothing in the /etc/resolv.conf.

Edit: After reading about DNS i think I pictured it wrong. I thought that the DNS cache should be written in a file so it is read after restart. This isnt the case right ? It is probably normal behaviour that the cache is reset after each restart of the server?
Last edited by Yoda007 on Wed Mar 04, 2015 4:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Posts: 44
Joined: Mon Jan 23, 2012 6:05 pm
by PatrickDickey » Wed Mar 04, 2015 12:51 pm
Yoda007 wrote:Already tried it still the same result - nothing in the /etc/resolv.conf.


By no means would I consider myself an expert. But, I think if you're trying to force it to use the servers listed in the configuration file, you need to uncomment the #no-resolv line. In theory, that should make your response times faster (as it's automatically going to the Public DNS servers). You most likely won't have anything in /etc/resolv.conf, but it won't matter (or shouldn't).

I have that uncommented in mine, and my /etc/resolv.conf file only has nameserver=127.0.0.1 in it.
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun May 11, 2014 6:44 am