jakebpg
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:36 pm

difference between hard float and soft

Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:07 pm

What's the difference between the hard float and the regular image on the download page?

Never heard the term hard float before and am just wondering.

Thanks in advance

User avatar
joan
Posts: 12738
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2012 5:09 pm
Location: UK

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:14 pm

Hard float just means the floating point calculations are done by on chip hardware rather than being emulated by software.

User avatar
Mr.Dave
Posts: 148
Joined: Sat Jun 30, 2012 6:59 pm

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Mon Oct 01, 2012 8:19 pm

Easy to remember:

Soft=Slow
Hard=Fast

jakebpg
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Sep 04, 2012 9:36 pm

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Mon Oct 01, 2012 10:12 pm

Thanks guys.

As I said never heard the term before in my15+ years in the IT industry

User avatar
redhawk
Posts: 3465
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 2:13 pm
Location: ::1

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Mon Oct 01, 2012 11:43 pm

Hard float and soft float is pretty much comparable to Intel based machines performing float point calculations in hardware (80x87 maths co-processor) or using software (float point emulation).
Hardware float point calculations will win every time on speed, however if you processor cannot float or perform this correctly i.e. Cyrix 486 or early Pentiums then software emulation is a life saver :)

Richard S.

pepedog
Posts: 1044
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:55 am

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:27 am

Aside from hardware differences, on the rpi archlinuxarm soft boots to command prompt in 24 seconds, hard in 10.
Probably most of the gain is from changing from init to systemd.
x86 stuff I have played with that is without co-processor are 8086, 386, 486SX, don't know about my Pentium60

User avatar
mikerr
Posts: 2465
Joined: Thu Jan 12, 2012 12:46 pm
Location: Up north , UK
Contact: Website

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Tue Oct 02, 2012 9:49 am

About 10x
Android app - Raspi Card Imager - download and image SD cards - No PC required !

tawalker
Posts: 180
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 9:02 am
Contact: Website

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Thu Oct 04, 2012 9:01 am

pepedog wrote:Aside from hardware differences, on the rpi archlinuxarm soft boots to command prompt in 24 seconds, hard in 10.
Probably most of the gain is from changing from init to systemd.
x86 stuff I have played with that is without co-processor are 8086, 386, 486SX, don't know about my Pentium60
I've just done a fresh install of "hard float" Arch/ARM on my Pi, and it configured itself to use systemd instead of initscripts. The system does seem to boot and run noticeably faster than the old "soft float" version, and I suspect systemd may play a part in that.

Even though I'm trying XFCE this time around (I used Fluxbox on the old install), performance feels smoother and quicker - wonder how fast Fluxbox will run on this setup?
---
Raspberry Pi Zero W with ZeroStem USB board (2017) ("zero") - Raspbian
Raspberry Pi Model B (1st-gen - 2012) ("ryo-ohki") - Arch Linux ARM
---

mrhobbeys
Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Jul 18, 2012 2:53 am

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Thu Oct 04, 2012 8:45 pm

From the sounds of it no one should ever use soft float?
www.betterpchealth.com
www.hektechnologies.com

pepedog
Posts: 1044
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:55 am

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Fri Oct 05, 2012 12:23 am

V5 soft float will remain, there are other (headless) arm devices that are speedier than the raspberrypi, Linux is about choice

User avatar
billb
Posts: 177
Joined: Wed Sep 19, 2012 10:27 pm

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Fri Oct 05, 2012 1:20 am

When building from source are there any particular flags we should set for hard float? Or is this taken care of automatically? (I'm using Raspbian wheezy)

pepedog
Posts: 1044
Joined: Fri Oct 07, 2011 9:55 am

Re: difference between hard float and soft

Fri Oct 05, 2012 9:23 am

If you use makepkg, it's taken care of.
Flags are in /etc/makepkg.conf

Return to “Arch”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest