gde061
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2017 4:24 am

Pixel x86 local install

Sat Jan 28, 2017 4:50 am

I am trying to figure out how to get the Pixel-x86 OS to run locally off the hard drive of my old ThinkCentre PC.

If there is a way to do that based on the rudiments of Linux -- which I'm still getting a handle on -- I would rather do that as a learning (and teaching) experience than clicking on an install option.

For those of us not staring out in the Apple universe -- turn it on an start writing BASIC -- the first exercise in becoming PC savvy was figuring out how to format the hard drive and install and OS. And getting a basic working understanding of device drivers along the way - like you have to have the CD ROM driver on your boot floppy disk if you plan to install your OS from CD.

Anyway, so far I've got Pixel running in live mode from a USB. I first installed gparted, then found my hard drive, partitioned (and formatted) it, and mounted it with a rudimentary knowledge of the following terminal commands:
pi@raspberrypi:~sudo apt-get gparted
pi@raspberrypi:~ sudo gparted
pi@raspberrypi:~lsblk
pi@raspberrypi:~fdisk -l
pi@raspberrypi:~sudo mkdir /mnt/local_HDD
pi@raspberrypi:~ $ sudo mount -o defaults /dev/sda3 /mnt/local_HDD
I have also figured out that the top level of the USB drive has been mounted as /lib/live/mount/medium. Presumably the 'live' and 'boot' directories as for booting from the usb and running live linux. And it seems that it should be possible to copy the necessary files out of the isolinux folder, but that's where I'm lost.

From a purely educational standpoint, I would appreciate it if someone would respond to this post and explain what is going on. Whey don't I see what looks like a linux installation in the live usb. And what is /lib/live/mount/rootfs/filesystem.squashfs ... is that the actual OS install?

If the Pi folks want to gauge the insterest in getting Pixel running on old x86 hardware, without necessarily creating an turnkey alternative to the Pi, I suggest a technical 'how to' post first, then look at how many hits it gets and what kind of issues / questions people come back with.

Thanks.

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fruitoftheloom
Posts: 15050
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:40 pm
Location: Bognor Regis UK

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Sat Jan 28, 2017 5:47 am

Maybe adding to existing Post would keep information in one place?

viewtopic.php?f=63&t=168852
My only "PC" is an Asus ChromeBit running ChromeOS, cloudcentric at its best !
Rockchip Quad-Core RK3288C SoC as used in ASUS Chromebook C201 & Chromebook Flip C100PA as well as the Tinker SBC.
3 Mobile Huawei E5330 Mobile Mi-Fi

gde061
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2017 4:24 am

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Mon Jan 30, 2017 2:43 am

That thread looks a little too generic to the pixel-desktop.

My question is very specific which is why I ask in my own thread.

I don't think it's unreasonable to expect a specific response... although if you look at what changed in the Linux community in the past 4 +/- years, it is the knowledgeability and willingness to help of the "regulars" on the boards. Eventually with enough tail chasing, it gets figured out, but that's not how a "community" should function. I'm speaking mainly from recent experience on the Ubuntu boards, not here specifically...

ewilcox
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Jan 04, 2017 3:11 am

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Mon Jan 30, 2017 7:30 am

I found this information in a comment on the introductory Pixel PC post.
How to: Install to the haed drive (as the only OS)

Warning! this instruction set will install Pixel on the hard drive and it will replace any other OS currently installed.

Assumptions:
The USB stick (or CD / DVD reader is /dev/sr0
The internal Hard rive is /dev/sda

1. Boot the computer from the USB or DVD / CD

2. Transfer the enture stick (DVD /CD) to the hard drive:

2.1 in a terminal window run the following commands:
2.1-a "sudo bash" (opens a root bash session)
2.1-b "dd if=/dev/sr0 of=/dev/sda bs=1M"

3. Reboot without the stick (DVD / CD), should boot from the internal HDD
3.1. Run the following command:
3.1-a "reboot"

4. Resize the partition:
4.1 In a teminal window run the following commands:
4.1-a "sudo bash" (opens a root bash session)
4.1-b "fdisk /dev/sda"
4.1-c "p" (Prints the list of partitions to the screen)
4.1-d Write down the starting location (begginning) of partition 2
4.1-e "d", "2" (deletes [d] partition 2 [2])
4.1-f "n" (Create a new partition [n], primary partition, starting at the location from 4.1-d)
4.1-g "w" (Write the partition to the HDD

5. Reboot
5.1 "reboot"

6. Resize the filesystem on /dev/sda2
6.1 In a terminal window run the following commands:
6.1-a "sudo bash" (opens a root bash session)
6.1-b "resize2fs /dev/sda2"

7. Reboot
7.1 "reboot" (You should now be running a persistent session from your hard drive.)

The first thing you should do after completing the above steps is to re-open a terminal window and do an update:
The update will fix an issuw where the panel crashes so you have no menu or task-bar

If you have this problem, you can switch to a terminal screen with the keyboard combination [CTRL +ALT + F1]
You cal switch back to the graphical desk-top environment with [CTRL + ALT + F7]

Sign in:
User name is "root"
Password is "rasberry"

Be careful! Ypu are now working in a super-user environment, so you can do almost anything unimpeded, including destroy your installation.

To update your new installation from this super-user session, run the following two commands in order:

"apt-get update"
"apt-get dist-upgrade"
"reboot" (reboots the system)

If you do not have the above mentioned problem, to update your new installation, from a terminal window, run the following two commands in order:

"sudo apt-get update"
"sudo apt-get dist-upgrade"

HTH,
Ernie

gde061
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2017 4:24 am

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Mon Jan 30, 2017 2:21 pm

Thanks - I will try it later when I get home tonight.

One thing that seems to vary from other procedures I've found discussing "live USB" ports when there is no install opition... most seemed to suggest that initially it would be necessary to boot from a third media (not the hard drive / not the live usb) and then mount the live usb in bulk disk mode (that's probably not the correct technical term, but that's how I understood it), in order to get the proper visibility of the contents of the live USB stick.

gde061
Posts: 8
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2017 4:24 am

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Tue Jan 31, 2017 10:30 pm

Tried to get this this procedure to work and had only partial success...

As I am running from an USB and not a CD/DVD, I needed to change dd if=/dev/sr0 to "dd if=/dev/sdb "...

First attempt the reboot failed, showing an "unknown" format for sda after the dd copy. The issue was that I was writing from vfat to an ext4 partition I think. Tried a second time after reformatting my hard drive to fat32. Boots up from the hard drive now fine, however, I am a little stuck at the step to resize the partition... I have only one partition, and it's the whole size of the hard drive.

Testing it out a little I discovered unfortunately that there is still no data persistence. So I guess that is why the second partition is needed. So since I started with only one partition, I will shrink partition 1 and make dev/sda2 the data partition per the guide, although I'm not sure how to get the mount point to stick around when I lose any directories I create. Also it's not possible to have multiple user accounts so this is really a quick and dirty solution to installing locally. Still Better than having to carry around a thumb drive to run it.

Thanks,
GD

ianken51
Posts: 14
Joined: Sat Jan 02, 2016 6:33 am

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Wed Mar 08, 2017 1:40 pm

I TRIED THIS AND IT WORKED FOR ME

I saw a post on YouTube by " hamdygital" with the title "Tuto | Install Debian Pixel, Raspbian Jessie on your computer | Raspberry pi | French HD". Yes it is in French, but hamdygital has added English subtitles making it easy to follow.

WARNING This method will ERASE your hard drive and install Raspberry Pixel for PC on your hard drive as the only OS. Proceed ONLY if this is what you want to do. Otherwise I suggest run it of your USB thumb drive.

1. Install Raspberry Pi Pixel for PC onto your USB thumb drive as per Raspberry Pi Org instructions.
2. Insert your USB thumb drive on the computer you want to use and turn it on and boot to the USB drive.
3. If you wish you can setup Pixel to suit your preferences now, or you can do it later. Your choice.
4. Assuming you are now running Pixel on your PC, run the terminal enter the following command:
sudo apt-get install gparted and press <enter>
5. When gparted has been installed run it by entering the following command:
sudo gparted and press <enter>
6. In the GParted window upper right-hand corner you should see a drop-down menu with an item like "/dev/sda (186.31 GiB)" and a down arrow. This is your hard drive, so take a note of the device (eg. /dev/sda).
If you click on the down arrow you should see a second device which is your USB thumb drive. It should read something like "/dev/sdb (14.44 GiB)". Jot down that device name also (eg. /dev/sdb). You'll need them both.
7. Now using GParted highlight the hard drive and "Unmount" and the "Delete" the partition. Now click on the green tick to Apply All Operations.
8. Now format the drive to "ext4" and again click on the green tick to complete. This may take some time depending on the size of your hard drive and speed of your CPU.
9. When finished shut down GParted and return to the terminal prompt.
10. Type in the following (I'm using my devices /dev/sda and /dev/sdb. You are copying Pixel from tou USB drive to your hard drive.
sudo cp /dev/sdb /dev/sda and press <enter>
It will take some time to copy the contents of the USB drive to the hard drive. However, when it is complete you can shut down your PC, remove the USB drive and reboot. With a bit of luck you will boot into Pixel on your hard drive. Now for some house-keeping.
11. Start the terminal and enter the following commands:
sudo passwd and press <enter>
This will change the password for "pi" from "raspberry" to one of your choosing and secure your PC.
Next type:
sudo gparted and press <enter>
You will see that the ext4 partition holding Pixel is only small. In my case the partition was 13.15 GiB, with 2.12 GiB used and 10.94 GiB unused (I used a 16 GiB USB drive). Out of my 186.31 GiB hard drive I have an unallocated partition of 171.87 GiB. I can either leave it for other use or allocate all of my drive to Pixel. To resize by click on /dev/sda2 and select "Partition>Resize/Move" from the menu bar and the allocate some or all of the free space in the Resize window presented.
12. I suggest that you now perform and update and upgrade of Pixel by entering the following commands:
sudo apt-get update <enter>
sudo apt-get upgrade -y <enter>
13. You will now have an up-to-date version of Raspbian Pixel for PC running. Best wishes.

JJ Lee
Posts: 2
Joined: Sun Mar 19, 2017 3:04 am

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Sun Mar 19, 2017 5:06 pm

I've put Pixel for PC on a Sony Vaio VGN-NR430E and a Asus EEE PC X-101CH, both local install.

Just wanted to say IanKen51's instruction (above, March 8) worked perfectly for me.

I did have to figure out how to launch from the USB without putting the hard drive into use, or some sort of process that made it busy.

If the hdd comes into use, when you try to umount, it says it can't. If that makes any sense...

I rebooted with the USB in and holding down the "ESC" key so that the computer offered choices from where to boot. After that when I used gparted, I was able to umount, delete, and then format the HDD in ext4.

I hope what I just mentioned above makes sense.

I've only just stumbled into alternative operating systems.

All this to say, the above instructions for local install were great.

Thanks.

loclyngrey
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Aug 24, 2013 11:38 am

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Mon Jul 10, 2017 9:09 am

Works for me, Acer Aspire One

Thanks for the post

B.Goode
Posts: 4689
Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2014 4:03 pm
Location: UK

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Mon Jul 10, 2017 10:18 am

Have these third-party instructions been superseded by developments released by the Raspberry Pi Foundation?

From: https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/a-rasp ... ing-tools/
Before Christmas, we released an experimental version of the desktop running on Debian for x86-based computers. We were slightly taken aback by how popular it turned out to be! This made us realise that this was something we were going to need to support going forward. We’ve decided we’re going to try to make all new desktop releases for both Pi and x86 from now on.

The version of this we released last year was a live image that could run from a USB stick. Many people asked if we could make it permanently installable, so this version includes an installer. This uses the standard Debian install process, so it ought to work on most machines. I should stress, though, that we haven’t been able to test on every type of hardware, so there may be issues on some computers. Please be sure to back up your hard drive before installing it. Unlike the live image, this will erase and reformat your hard drive, and you will lose anything that is already on it!

You can still boot the image as a live image if you don’t want to install it, and it will create a persistence partition on the USB stick so you can save data. Just select ‘Run with persistence’ from the boot menu. To install, choose either ‘Install’ or ‘Graphical install’ from the same menu. The Debian installer will then walk you through the install process.

You can download the latest x86 image (which includes both Scratch 2.0 and Thonny) from here or here for a torrent file.

jamesh
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 18191
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:41 pm

Re: Pixel x86 local install

Tue Jul 11, 2017 9:14 am

B.Goode wrote:Have these third-party instructions been superseded by developments released by the Raspberry Pi Foundation?

From: https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/a-rasp ... ing-tools/
Before Christmas, we released an experimental version of the desktop running on Debian for x86-based computers. We were slightly taken aback by how popular it turned out to be! This made us realise that this was something we were going to need to support going forward. We’ve decided we’re going to try to make all new desktop releases for both Pi and x86 from now on.

The version of this we released last year was a live image that could run from a USB stick. Many people asked if we could make it permanently installable, so this version includes an installer. This uses the standard Debian install process, so it ought to work on most machines. I should stress, though, that we haven’t been able to test on every type of hardware, so there may be issues on some computers. Please be sure to back up your hard drive before installing it. Unlike the live image, this will erase and reformat your hard drive, and you will lose anything that is already on it!

You can still boot the image as a live image if you don’t want to install it, and it will create a persistence partition on the USB stick so you can save data. Just select ‘Run with persistence’ from the boot menu. To install, choose either ‘Install’ or ‘Graphical install’ from the same menu. The Debian installer will then walk you through the install process.

You can download the latest x86 image (which includes both Scratch 2.0 and Thonny) from here or here for a torrent file.
Yes, so locking this thread. Please use the new instruction, as linked above.
Principal Software Engineer at Raspberry Pi (Trading) Ltd.
Please direct all questions to the forum, I do not do support via PM.

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