PennyPacker1
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 7:58 am

Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Thu Oct 20, 2016 8:13 am

Hello!

I have been given a task from my boss to autolaunch Chromium on our raspberry in full screen with a specific website showing. I have been googling around a lot and there seems to be quite a few solutions out there. Although I have been struggling with getting any of them to work properly. Seems to me that the solutions change somewhat depending on what version you are using. I was hoping that someone has an updated solution for this and can give me a guide on how to do this smoothly.

I also need to know how to properly exit the kiosk mode to enter the GUI mode again when doing testing. I am a beginner at this so please provide in depth guidance or tips on how to solve this.

Many thanks beforehand :)
/Erik

PennyPacker1
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 20, 2016 7:58 am

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Wed Oct 26, 2016 11:09 am

Can anyone help me with this? :)

stefanschauer
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:37 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Tue Nov 22, 2016 3:40 pm

go to ~/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

delete or comment the line with @xscreensaver -no-splash
and add
@xset s off
@xset -dpms
@xset s noblank
@unclutter
@chromium-browser --noerrdialogs --kiosk --incognito http://www.domain.com/to/kiosk/page

bkm888
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2017 8:56 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Mon Jan 16, 2017 4:04 am

Before I get started here, dear reader needs to be aware that this is a long and wordy reply and not only a damn good set of instructions, but also my opportunity to finally dump my rant on all the noble RPi fanatics that seems to have found it beneath themselves to write something straight forward that the newbies can use to actually get something like this working. I mean if you want the community to actually grow, you have to promote the projects with uplifting results, and not keep telling them to read the stupid man pages. (My rant on the usefulness of those man pages at another time.)

I have a RPi3 and a RPi2 to work with and this is how it went.

Okay, I have spent a week dredging every forum and "how to" instructable I could find to try to solve this problem.I even purchased someones RPi image that was supposed to do this all so neatly. The purchased option did work, but had limited room for changing it to fit any special needs. So, I took all the information I could find and spent another week experimenting to find a sure fire way to make this work by combining all the ideas in all that research until I had the sure-fire formula. And here it is...

First of all in most revisions of Jessie for the RPi, the changing of the autostart file does NOT work.
Secondly... wait a sec... say what!!! There are multiple revisions of Jessie?!? Uhmm... Yup
And that is the key to getting a functional signage display. Knowing what revision to get and what to do to it to make it display your webpage nicely. So for the beginner, you must get over this surprise if you are going to make something work in your lifetime, or at least without copious quantities of beer and anti-depressants. So, let's start there...

From your favorite browser, do a search for "older revisions of RPi jessie". You should eventually stumble across the complete list of older revisions. At the time of this writing, I had found it at downloads.raspberrypi.org/raspbian/images
Now this next part just made me pull my hair out, or it certainly delayed me finding this stuff for a few minutes but I had a whole refrigerator full of cheap mexican beer and alot of time on my hands anyway.

From the list of revisions, and for THIS particular set of instructions, you want to download the image file:
2016-09-23-raspbian-jessie.zip ok, waiting..... waiting.... Oh! you mean you cant find it in the list?!?
That's right! The filename is the one you want, but there is no such date listed on the page we found. huh.
That is because someone hid it in the link dated 2016-09-28. Well, ain't that just special. Pause here. Drink beer. Ok move on.

So don't believe everything you here or read about "must have the latest revisions of everything" or it may not work. Well, guess what. The latest revision of everything at the time of this writing is broken anyway! Unless you can become an expert in the "systemd" package and figure out what is pointed where in the 2017-1-11 rev, the you will never get it to work.

Download the image I told you to get and write it out to a fresh (micro)SD card.
Put it in the pi and boot it up. Now, if you have a keyboard and mouse to attach to your pi, then your good. If not, just make sure you can ssh into the pi from another pc on the same network. Either way the commands are all the same whether you do it in a terminal window on the fancy desktop or do it in a ssh terminal session.

So get your terminal window open and type:
sudo raspi-config
then use the old fashioned text menu to do the following:
- Expand the filesystem (option 1)
- Change the User Password (option2)
- Change Boot Options to "Desktop Autologin" (option B4 under Boot Options)
- Change your regional settings (option 5)
- Set your Hostname (option A2 under Advanced Options)
- Make sure SSH is turned on (option A4 under Advanced Options)
- Change the Memory Split to 128 (or more) for video or intense graphic content (option A3 under Advanced Options)
If you want to alter any of the other stuff, do that now before you select <Finish> to end it and reboot.

**Special Note: Do NOT try using the overclock feature. If you plan to use this pi as a signage display, do you really want to receive the embarrassing phone call on your day off that your little unattended pi box burnt up? Swallow your pride and let it run at it's own speed. If you wanted something faster you should have spent more money on different hardware. 'nuff said! Pause... Drink beer while pi reboots... ok, move on.

Now, here is where the noble ones would tell you to apt-get update, upgrade, distro upgrade, your girlfriend upgrade, Just STOP okay. In this particular instance we don't want to upgrade the little pi to the stratosphere because at the time of this writing it would cough and gasp and maybe still let your browser work. Whoops! My bad. No it broke chromium damn it!
Pause... deep breathe... Drink another beer... It's all behind you now... find your zen... okay screw zen, drink another mexi-beer and move on.

So, open your terminal and type the following commands
sudo apt-get update (we just want to know what is new for the few things we really need)

After the update finishes we have to download and install 2 packages that are not part of this rev of jessie:
apt-get install unclutter
apt-get install xdotool

The unclutter tool lets you hide the mouse pointer on your fancy signage display and the xdotool lets you hack a way to do some other important stuff later in this rant, uhm, I mean instrunctions. :oops:

Now you should still be in the /home/pi user directory, so if not then get there so we can move on. Drinking beer while I wait :D
Okay, we need to create 2 little scripts in your landing directory so we can circumvent the maddening, tempermental, ugh. Maybe I don't have enough beer after all.
Create the scripts like this:
nano start_chromium.sh
# Run browser after boot to desktop
/bin/sleep 3
sudo -u pi chromium-browser --kiosk --incognito http://your.favorite.website &
# End of script

Ctrl-x to close and save the file.
(If I need to tell you to replace "your.favorite.website" with your intended display webpage, then maybe you need another beer)

Okay, now let's do the other script:
nano start_URLrefresh.sh
# Start a goofy command loop to refresh the browser every 90 seconds
/bin/sleep 6
/usr/bin/lxterminal --command watch -n 90 xdotool key ctrl+F5 &
# End of goofy script

Ctrl-x to close and save the file.

Okay, now to explain what we just did. The scripts are named "start_chromium.sh" and "start_URLrefresh.sh" and I kinda hope you can figure out what each one does by the name?!? The sleep command turns out to be necessary to get the timing of the programs correct so don't ignore it. Also notice the extra space and the & symbol at the end of the commands. This turns out to be needed as well. It starts the package and then lets the focus move past it so other things can get underway in the right order. In the URL refresh script, the watch command forces the system to do the command that follows it every x number of seconds (in this case 90). The lxterminal is needed to run the commands because the typical init or xinit methods of starting stuff in jessie are hit or miss based on what revision you have, so this way may not look clean, but it works every time. Finally the xdotool lets you force a simulated keyboard entry of anything you want on the currently open/focused page. In this case we are telling it to hit the <Ctrl> and the <F5> key. This represents a shortcut key to make chromium refresh the page. The <Ctrl> key means it ignores anything in the browser cache. As for the script to start the browser, the switches that follow the command are all that is needed to open a webpage in full screen with no borders, no title or navigation bars etc. As long as you are NOT going to be displaying a Google page, everything will work fine. If you must display a Google page, then you will have to figure out a way to get it to stop telling you you are using an old version of chromium. There is just not enough beer for me to fix that one. :lol:

Okay, so you have your needed script files, but they will not work unless you make them executable. There are 2 ways to do this and I just did BOTH in one behind the other to make damned sure they were executable. If you want to pick just one, so be it. But I will laugh at you if it doesn't work for your particular case. Been there, done that, so I did both. Pause, drink, move on.
I typed the following commands:
sudo chmod 755 start_URLrefresh.sh
sudo chmod +x start_URLrefresh.sh
sudo chmod 755 start_chromium.sh
sudo chmod +x start_chromium.sh


Now your scripts are for sure executable. ;) Next the autostart file needs to be modified to make use of our scripts and the following commands added to the end of the file and in the specific order you see them here:
nano /home/pi/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart
@xset s off
@xset s noblank
@xset -dpms
@unclutter -idle 5 -root
@/home/pi/start_URLrefresh.sh
@/home/pi/start_chromium.sh

Now don't close the file just yet, you need to comment out one line with a #, so edit to look like this:
# @xscreensaver -no-splash
Now you can Crtl-x to close and save the file.

The first 3 xset commands work together to stop the screen blanking. The unclutter command hides the mouse pointer on your display after 5 seconds. Then you can see your 2 scripts listed. If you reverse the order of the scripts you will have an open terminal window in the middle of your pretty signage display. Whew, almost there. Pause.. take leisurely long drink of beer. Ahhhh. Move on.

**Special Note - There may be some pi boards that are faster or slower than my examples. In this case you may find that your display either has the dreaded terminal window out in front, or that your refresh is not working at all. When we made the 2 little script files they each had a /bin/sleep command. You can tune your system by altering the number of seconds each one sleeps. You see, it turns out that you have to start the refresh just before the browser loads in order for it to work properly. Yet, you done want to have the terminal window it starts to be displayed any longer than really needed because, well... it's just ugly, even for those few seconds. Since the browser is so huge of a package it takes longer to load than you might want. While it loads, the wallpaper background image of the desktop is displayed until the browser finishes loading. The sleep commands are your way of fine tuning that experience.

Finally there is one last thing that bugged me about how the pi started up. That goofy cartoon fruit splash screen. If you want to be rid if it you can edit it out by removing the word "splash" form the single command line in /boot/cmdline.txt file. To do that:
sudo nano /boot/cmdline.txt
and edit out the splash, then Ctrl-x to save and close the file.

Now, sit back and open another beer. This is the moment you have been waiting for...
type:
sudo reboot
and watch your signage display come to life. 8-)

Ok, so now I expect to get all the stuck up, uh.. I mean noble pi fanatics to immediately jump in here to critique these instructions with their "Oh, that is so clunky and dirty looking for making a simple signage display". So let me tell you all now.... Bite Me! If you want to spend your precious time critiquing my instructions (mixed in with my rant about you) then you should have damned well taken the time to write something that definitively works EVERY TIME. How are we supposed to , as hobbyists, suffer through inaccurate man pages, endless trial and error efforts, and put up with holier-than-thou responses to our efforts to find help. That is no way to build a community of fledgling developers. Take some time one day and pick a target problem, then explain the solution in simple terms like I tried to do here. You will have done something good, because everyone that reads the article will gain knowledge that can be used in their future attempts at pi work. Otherwise, If you really want to do something useful with your blessed life, then at least add on to what I have here by telling us in laymans terms how to blank out the scrolling script messages that whiz by during boot-up. Or, how about a way to stop Google from overpowering your chromium settings to display a message telling you that your version of chromium is old, or maybe a way to make all this stuff work in the newest raspbian release EVERY TIME. But don't waste your time correcting my spelling or my approach. I admit up front is it a Macguiver bull dozer tactic to make a display, but it freaking works if done exactly as I laid out. If you tried these instructions on the 2017-01-11 raspbian jessie (or any other rev for that matter) and it didn't work, then maybe you should give up drinking beer with me and read the instructions again.

Ok, done here. Time to buy more beer. Let the nay sayers chime in now.
Last edited by bkm888 on Mon Jan 16, 2017 1:52 pm, edited 2 times in total.

jamesh
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 23366
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:41 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Mon Jan 16, 2017 1:14 pm

I would chime in, but TL/DR.

In all seriousness, snarky posts are MUCH less likely to be read than unsnarky ones. Once someone mentions the word rant, most people stop reading.
Principal Software Engineer at Raspberry Pi (Trading) Ltd.
Contrary to popular belief, humorous signatures are allowed. Here's an example...
"My grief counseller just died, luckily, he was so good, I didn't care."

bkm888
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2017 8:56 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Mon Jan 16, 2017 2:09 pm

LOL, thank you sir james. You are probably right, but it was actually intentional. The folks that are overly critical are the ones that will see "rant" and move on without finishing. That was kinda the idea here. The poor hobbyist that has been banging his head against the wall looking for answers (or at least clear explanations) will be desperate enough to read it and find relief. Heck, someone might even read this and actually start selling hi-def televisions with a RPi attached tomorrow to some family owned shop keepers that would feel good with an affordable fancy sign. So why not give them absolutely everything they need to get it done, especially if they were determined enough to suffer through my rant//instructions. ;)

You never know. If the struggling hobbyist actually makes something useful and maybe even a few euros for helping a small business that might not be able to afford all the expensive subscription service signs, then maybe they dig even deeper next time and get excited about contributing to other RPi projects. Either way... I think it's all good in the end.

Thank you for being courageous enough to post it anyway and see what comes of it.

Sincerely,
A True Hobbyist

bkm888
Posts: 13
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2017 8:56 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Mon Jan 16, 2017 2:58 pm

Hmm... I guess in my frustration to get a complete set of instructions out of my system, I actually left the original post by PennyPacker with an unanswered question.
I also need to know how to properly exit the kiosk mode to enter the GUI mode again when doing testing. I am a beginner at this so please provide in depth guidance or tips on how to solve this.

Many thanks beforehand :)
/Erik
So, Erik... my apologies for not trying to be complete in answering your post. So let's start there:

When (if you followed my instructions) you have a running display sign mounted up in public view, it is not usually very practical to try to attach a keyboard and mouse to your sign to make changes. However, if you do have them still attached (as in testing scenarios), and if you did use my instructions to set this up, then you would still have an "active" keyboard and mouse. You can use one of 2 different key combinations to shut down the browser:
CTRL + SHIFT + W
- or -
ALT + F4

** Special Note: If you broke down and went with the purchased pi image to do signage, then you would find the author has gone through extensive steps to PREVENT the ability to get to at desktop, and has disabled practically every keyboard combination in his code. I know, I went looking to try to get that ability back, but was just not interested in rewriting his stuff while possibly breaking something else.


Anyway, booth of these key combinations work to close the browser without rebooting the pi, but only if you have a working keyboard and mouse attached. If no keyboard and mouse attached, then you could attach them and reboot the RPi. On reboot the keyboard and mouse would be enabled and you can then use the key combinations listed above. Sometimes hot-plugging of those devices works on RPi and sometimes it does not. If it works then you can use the above key combinations to stop the browser, but if not then you will have to reboot the RPi to get then noticed by the system.

Another way to do this, if you do NOT have a keyboard and mouse attached to the RPi, then you could SSH into it from another pc/terminal on the same network. If you want to use commonly available and quickly accessible computers then you will probably have to download something like "Putty" and run it to access the RPi. Putty is a open source SSH client that lets you connect to the RPi on port 22 and have a terminal window into the running RPi (even if it is busy displaying your fancy sign in chromium). Not matter what the pi is doing you can still get a SSH session up and take control of things. It is even possible to carry a USB thumb drive/stick with Putty on it and run it from the USB drive (on another pc on the network) to start an SSH session.

So, just use whatever SSH client you have available to log into the pi and type the following command:
sudo killall chromium-browser
This will stop the browser and give back the desktop environment.
Now if you want to get a keyboard and mouse connected to the pi to work with the GUI, then you will have to plug in those items and instead of typing the killall command type in sudo reboot. and this will make sure that the keyboard and mouse are detected (sometimes hot-plugging does not work with certain brands of keyboards and mice).

After the pi reboots, then restart your SSH session and use the killall command again to stop the browser or the key combinations on the pi keyboard. Then you will have the attention of the pi's desktop and a working keyboard and mouse attached.

Some will say "Forget all that SSH stuff, its way too much effort. Why not just disconnect the power from the pi to reboot it?"

Okay, but my experience with many many many :cry: power disconnects during my testing and learning trials, is the micro USB connector will either break or wear out. Either way the RPi is then destroyed unless you are set up to do that kind of repair under a magnifying glass. That was the reason the cellular phone industry started promoting the wireless inductive charging features on new phones. The micro USB connectors would go bad before the phone contract time was up. So connecting the power supply as few times as possible is always a good idea to save the hassle and expense of getting either another pi board, another power supply, or both.

Hope this helps. Or maybe it's too much information. :oops: Either way, Good luck with your project.
BKM888

rasdebut
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 11:30 am

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Sun Feb 05, 2017 11:35 am

After hours of searching i finally found a solution here:
http://raspberrypi.stackexchange.com/qu ... ebian-whee

All i had to to was to copy the autostart file from /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart to /home/pi/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart with the command:
cp /etc/xdg/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart /home/pi/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

After that i edited the local version:

sudo nano /home/pi/.config/lxsession/LXDE-pi/autostart

#@xscreensaver -no-splash # comment this line out to disable screensaver
@xset s off
@xset -dpms
@xset s noblank
@chromium-browser --incognito --kiosk http://localhost/ # load chromium after boot and point

and it worked like a charm.
Hope you find this helpful

diverjoe
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Apr 26, 2017 8:32 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Wed Apr 26, 2017 8:43 pm

:twisted:
**********************************************************
I TOO WOULD LIKE TO BEGIN WITH A RANT!!!!
**********************************************************

THIS IS FREAKIN AWESOME!!!!

</rant >

All joking aside this was the only one that worked after trying 4 others.! It acts just as I would like. I removed the Refresh as I have an interactive app, but the rest of it left the screen ready to go. I do have one quick question...it appears to start the boot-up procedure with all the commands scrolling by, followed by a white screen, then it appears to go back to scrolling. after about the same amount of time, the white screen comes back and then Chromium loads with my page. Just wondering if this is "normal" (how things look with beer) or is it a remnant of some of the things i tried before getting here? ( I did bypass the load a fresh img part as I have got a good bit of time invested in the setup of the app already. :-( )

Once again - Thanks!

sarahclen
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu May 04, 2017 2:02 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Thu May 04, 2017 2:07 pm

From a newbie who is just learning all this stuff, thank you for the instructions and your sense of humor. I work for a public library and am exploring using raspberry pi to serve as the library catalog. This has helped get 90% of the way there and now I can learn more as I tweak it slightly to fit my needs.

Very nice instructions and the explanations helped me learn, rather than just blindly following what has worked for someone else without understanding why it works or what it is doing. :D

mrburnette
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed Mar 15, 2017 2:39 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Thu Jun 15, 2017 3:57 pm

For those who would (or need) a non-scripted method of talking to the RPi serial console, I have devised a rather simple Arduino solution that can "autotype" with the selection of the desired message ( 0 - 7) and the push of a single button. Essentially, this procedure puts the "scripting" into the Arduino; so, if you can make the RPi do what you want at the console, you can automate simply by crafting those same keystrokes into the Arduino. One Arduino in a small enclosure "could" be utilized to control/manage multiple RPi units as only the Gnd and the GPIO15 line needs to be connected (I would recommend a small connection jack and plug to ensure a decent connection each time.)

Ray
https://www.hackster.io/rayburne/rpi-se ... ino-355525

KMStechteacher
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Sep 15, 2017 7:15 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Fri Sep 15, 2017 7:19 pm

This is the best and most straightforward descriptions I have seen. You have been a tremendous help to create a kiosk for my school. I too have searched endlessly to make this kind of setup.

thanks!

Etownflyboy
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Jan 05, 2018 2:11 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Fri Jan 05, 2018 2:58 pm

A BIG shout out to bkm888 for taking the time to write up a useful descriptive and most helpful piece on Raspberry Pi set up.
I have spent weeks searching the net, trial and error mostly error.
Trying to set up my HDMI TV with the RPi for my home to display the weather, time, weekly forecast, to-do list and sync with google calendar when I came across your post.
My wife was surprised that only just the power cable was showing when mounted to the wall.
I was able to mount everything inside the TV!
It's actually quite beautiful and functional.
Also thank you for the updates on how to exit chromium browser.
I use a wireless keyboard and mouse just in case I need them for some reason but the SSH works great for updates and tweaks.
YOU ROCK!!
Thank you again for your work helping the beginners. :D
Cheers and Beers!

cgillinger
Posts: 5
Joined: Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:21 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:54 pm

Hi all!

Could someone help me out? TL;DR Need to autostart three tabs in Chromium, with two addons active to make them switch and unload. All this in kiosk mode and used for signage.

Longer version:
I've tried bkm888's solution on my brand new Pi 3 but I've come across some issues.

First my objective:

Transform the Pi to a signage solution showing three different webpages on fullscreen in kiosk mode. The three pages should alternate at a fixed intervall. The pages apparently are heavy on the browser (Crowdtangle realtime data for Instagram and Facebook).

Here's my problem: Following bkm888 to the letter works fine to just get a browser with a page up. No issues. But:


First I need to make the tabs rotate. For this I use the "Revolver" add-on. Second, the webpages that I need to show are heavy enough to have the Pi (and/or browser not sure) crash after awhile. To counter this I'd like to use "The Great Suspender" add-on, that unloads idle tabs.

However, the Chromium version used in bkm888's solution is to old for the addons to work. Updating to latest version broke something, not sure what.

I've also tried using latest Sketch and this solution:
http://www.knight-of-pi.org/update-auto ... lications/

But it will only show one tab, no Revolver and no Great Suspender. Also, mouse pointer.

Could someone help me out?

Cheers,
C

sgsax
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Oct 08, 2014 10:19 pm

Re: Autostart Chromium in latest version of Pixel

Mon Mar 04, 2019 11:44 pm

The version of chromium-browser (65.0.3325.181) in the current release of Raspbian (2018-11-13-raspbian-stretch) should support whatever extensions you want to use. I might also suggest not invoking the browser with --kiosk or --incognito. Using --start-fullscreen alone should get you the result you want.

In my own run browser script, I also flush cache files and stale errors from crashes, just to keep things clean. It looks like this:

Code: Select all

#!/bin/bash

BROWSER=chromium-browser
BROWSEROPTS="--display=:0 --start-fullscreen --noerrdialogs"
PROFILEDIR=$HOME/.config/chromium/Default
CACHEDIR=$HOME/.cache/chromium/Default/Cache
URL="http://url.example.org"

# cleanup files to remove error messages on start
sed -i 's/"exited_cleanly":*false/"exited_cleanly":true/' $PROFILEDIR/Preferences
sed -i 's/"exit_type":*"Crashed"/"exit_type":"None"/' $PROFILEDIR/Preferences
rm -rf $PROFILEDIR/Current* $PROFILEDIR/Last* $CACHEDIR/*

$BROWSER $BROWSEROPTS $URL >/dev/null 2>&1 &
sleep 20
xte "key F5" -x:0
I explicitly state the display number because I ssh into the Pi remotely to stop (using killall) and start the browser when it needs to be kicked. If you don't plan on doing this, you can leave that option off your invocation.

The call to xte here is using xautomation to send an F5 keystroke to refresh the browser window. It's probably not critical to include. I think I added it because my signage was acting funny on load at one point. The sleep period is also probably longer than necessary, I just wanted to make sure the browser had plenty of time to start before pushing the F5.

To get rid of the mouse pointer, you need to install and run unclutter in your autostart file. I believe this is outlined in the earlier post.

Enjoy!

Seth
cgillinger wrote:
Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:54 pm
Hi all!

Could someone help me out? TL;DR Need to autostart three tabs in Chromium, with two addons active to make them switch and unload. All this in kiosk mode and used for signage.

Longer version:
I've tried bkm888's solution on my brand new Pi 3 but I've come across some issues.

First my objective:

Transform the Pi to a signage solution showing three different webpages on fullscreen in kiosk mode. The three pages should alternate at a fixed intervall. The pages apparently are heavy on the browser (Crowdtangle realtime data for Instagram and Facebook).

Here's my problem: Following bkm888 to the letter works fine to just get a browser with a page up. No issues. But:


First I need to make the tabs rotate. For this I use the "Revolver" add-on. Second, the webpages that I need to show are heavy enough to have the Pi (and/or browser not sure) crash after awhile. To counter this I'd like to use "The Great Suspender" add-on, that unloads idle tabs.

However, the Chromium version used in bkm888's solution is to old for the addons to work. Updating to latest version broke something, not sure what.

I've also tried using latest Sketch and this solution:
http://www.knight-of-pi.org/update-auto ... lications/

But it will only show one tab, no Revolver and no Great Suspender. Also, mouse pointer.

Could someone help me out?

Cheers,
C

Return to “Beginners”