mysteryvortex
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Fri Jul 29, 2011 8:42 pm

Mirroring my comment into the forums: http://www.raspberrypi.org/?p=.....omment-387

Another good question is exactly which SOC you are using, I can’t seem to find that information. I see mention of broadcom in one of the other comments, and also note that Eben works there. But all I ever find mentioned “spec” wise is “700MHz ARM11?

The follow up questions are:
1) Is there a datasheet publicly available? (The 2 page advertisment doesn’t count)
2) How open is the hardware? Is there a schematic, or at least a GPIO map?
3) How customized is the kernel? Is all the hardware support I need in the mainline? If not, is there a public repo with commit history back to the mainline or is it just a code dump?
4) Is there any hardware that doesn’t have an open driver? Am I required to load proprietary kernel modules? (This is often the case with GPUs, MPEG decoders, etc…)

Thanks for answering all my questions, I’ll put any other follow up questions in the forums.

dlormand
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Tue Aug 16, 2011 7:23 pm

Yes, I'd be interested in a deeper answer as well. What are your thoughts on Open Hardware? Any notion to do something similar to the Ben Nanonote (http://en.qi-hardware.com/wiki.....n_NanoNote)? As in, making the design materials from an open-source tool (e.g. PCB or Kicad) available for general use under a GPL-like license? I'd sure like to see a schematic...

obarthelemy
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Tue Aug 16, 2011 7:36 pm

the official wiki is there: http://elinux.org/RaspberryPiB.....I2C.2C_SPI
it has plenty (some ?) of info on the hardware.

Michael
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Tue Aug 16, 2011 8:02 pm

...Including a link to the 759 page technical reference manual on the ARM1176JZF-S core and link to the 48 page datasheet for the LAN9512 peripheral controller.

Eben has publically stated that the directors are seriously considering whether to open source the hardware design files or not (gerbers, schematics, etc), but they havn't made a final decision yet.

Personally, I'm hoping they will open source the hardware but under a no-derivations, share-alike license so as to avoid the situation that arose with Beagleboard and AlwaysInnovating. But one can't make a direct comparrison between beagleboard.org and Raspberry Pi Foundation as the structure and aims are quite different.

There are a couple of other forum threads you may wish to check out including topic 36: Broadcom BCMxxxx SoC
topic 124: Custom kernels and the binary blob.
topic 19: ARM chip specs and TrustZone

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abishur
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Tue Aug 16, 2011 8:37 pm

And don't forget to read the "Read before posting" thread (a link can be found in my signature) it answers some basic questions and gives some good links for additional information (such as links to the previously mentioned wiki)

There's been some confusion about how open source the r-pi is. The answer is that the r-pi is open. The only item that is not open source is a little blob on the broadcom GPU, but we've been assured that this is a very low level blob and that the drivers that interact with it will themselves be open source. Part of that closed source also, at this point in times, does include too many details about the chip (such as what chip they're using). This is something out of r-pi's control, so we'll all have to make do with that for now.

The good news is that phones are much the same way (using ARM chips themselves) and people never notice this small bit of enforced closed sourceness ;)

As for schematics of the GPIOs, at this point in time all we've been told is that there are 16 of them. If you'd like to see a labeled layout of the PCB, I made one here, but I don't think that's what you're really looking for in a schematic.

With how busy the r-pi team is getting the product itself ready, I imagine a lot of in and outs will be self discovered then community shared (a task I think most of us are actually hoping for :P ), but they'll come in due time.
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wskinny
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:15 pm

Well, I do need the schematics, preferably editable in either DipTrace or design spark, as I'm considering a derivative design with dual and improved SoC's and an additional MCU.

But this is just for one project, and I have a couple more in mind that would really appreciate some optimization.

I'd like the schematic so that I'd have a solid foundation to work on top, as this will be my first SoC design. Not to mention that I'd enjoy keeping it "compatible" as much as possible with the original software wise.

plugwash
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:00 pm

Michael wrote:and link to the 48 page datasheet for the LAN9512 peripheral controller.
Unforrtunately that datasheet seems to say nothing about how you program the thing just what all the pins do. I'd quite like to take control of the LEDs connected to that chip but I can't find the documentation needed to do so.

jamesh
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:01 pm

wskinny wrote:Well, I do need the schematics, preferably editable in either DipTrace or design spark, as I'm considering a derivative design with dual and improved SoC's and an additional MCU.

But this is just for one project, and I have a couple more in mind that would really appreciate some optimization.

I'd like the schematic so that I'd have a solid foundation to work on top, as this will be my first SoC design. Not to mention that I'd enjoy keeping it "compatible" as much as possible with the original software wise.
Well, this is a very (very) old thread, but you should find the schematic around somewhere - google should help.

BUT, you are unlikely to be able to buy the SoC (BRCM2835), so you may have to find an alternative, in which case, a schematic isn't going to help a great deal - maybe a little - since the pinouts for SoC are all different. In fact, given your use of dual processors and MCU I doubt the schematic will be of any use whatsoever - you will need a completely new design.
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johnbeetem
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Mon Jun 24, 2013 11:26 pm

wskinny wrote:Well, I do need the schematics, preferably editable in either DipTrace or design spark, as I'm considering a derivative design with dual and improved SoC's and an additional MCU.
The RasPi schematics in .pdf form are at the RasPi Hardware Wiki: http://elinux.org/Rpi_Hardware#Schematic_.2F_Layout

Heater
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Re: Which SOC? Datasheets? Schematics? GPIOs? Open Drivers?

Tue Jun 25, 2013 7:03 am

wskinny,
Well, I do need the schematics, preferably editable in either DipTrace or design spark, as I'm considering a derivative design with dual and improved SoC's and an additional MCU.
This makes no sense. If you use an "improved Soc" that implies it is different than the SoC in the Pi. And that implies the schematics of the Pi will not help you.

Also there is no way to buy the Pi's SoC so it's not possible to make your own. I guess if you put an order into Broadcom for a million devices they might think about it.

I'm not sure what a dual SoC would do for you. Now a days you can get a dual core ARM board for 50 Euros or so.

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