User avatar
morphy_richards
Posts: 1603
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 3:26 pm
Location: Epping Forest
Contact: Website

Re: What chance the Raspi against the might of Microsoft

Wed Mar 28, 2012 7:12 pm

dave_s said:


Everyone seems intersted int the gadgets and missed that MS have been asked to set the GCSE questions. So how many questions will be outside MS products?



Really? Where? How?

User avatar
SN
Posts: 1014
Joined: Mon Feb 13, 2012 8:06 pm
Location: Romiley, UK
Contact: Website

Re: What chance the Raspi against the might of Microsoft

Wed Mar 28, 2012 7:20 pm

There"s a quote in the orignal article about MS working with the exam board AQA
Steve N – binatone mk4->intellivision->zx81->spectrum->cbm64->cpc6128->520stfm->pc->raspi ?

User avatar
morphy_richards
Posts: 1603
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 3:26 pm
Location: Epping Forest
Contact: Website

Re: What chance the Raspi against the might of Microsoft

Wed Mar 28, 2012 7:59 pm

SN said:


There"s a quote in the orignal article about MS working with the exam board AQA


Yesterday I was on a training event for the AQA computer science GCSE. I was really pleased with it. It will be a 60% controlled assignment (programming coursework) 40% exam and where the projects will be based on:


Mobile Devices
Web application development
Gaming
"Traditional" programming

The students will choose two of the four options. There will be 9 marks for design, 9 marks for having a working solution, 9 marks for the evaluation and 36 marks for the processes used to get to the solution. (edit - marks are 'ish' as I remember off hand) You will be able to use any method, language, environment for developing and any process for the design. It will need to be documented and the documentation can be video, photo, screenshot, pretty much anything. So, there would be nothing to stop a student designing a game in Scratch (for example) the only limitation is that the language used must be good enough to accomplish the desired goal.

The exam will be based on hardware, networks, algorithms in general and computing in a wider context – ie. effects of computing on society in general. You could argue that MS have had an influence on the networks side of things as it will be less to do with network topologies and more to do with web based client / server applications type stuff. (Where they have a strong hold with asp.net) I don’t have a problem with that given that I believe the vast majority of careers in computing are in this field and the questions will be theoretical – meaning that you can happily teach them this using PHP.

To put things into context, (this is the bit where I demonstrate that I'm a bit daft) I still think that the only reason Michael Gove listened to the Royal Society, CAS and Google is because he still views Rupert Murdoch as his boss, uncle and the 'Daddy' and Rupert Murdoch had his eyes on UK IT education (and education in general) – he was about to open a load of academies in East London and launch some weird computing and education system based on Sky News, Sun and Times, just before the whole scandal about NewsCorp hit and the only thing that's saved us is that scandal as the ball was set in motion but he has been terminally tarnished…

So clearly from this I'm about as crazy and sucked in by conspiracy theories as anyone but still I don’t see that MS / Google / Big Industry involvement is bad necessarily because, fortunately their influence is being tempered and steered by the involvement of the likes of the Royal Society and Computing at School.

If you look at it, Google and Microsoft (and smaller players like Adobe) are the only "tangible" players in the industry. I say "tangible" because the open source community is quite intangible but fortunately they are very much at the driving end of all this change (along with the big businesses).

Realistically, if MS and Google were denied a say in all of this – when MS and Google are so important in the general scheme of things, then all this change would be fundamentally flawed. Everything needs to be taken in context.

User avatar
r3d4
Posts: 984
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 8:21 am
Location: ./

Re: What chance the Raspi against the might of Microsoft

Wed Mar 28, 2012 8:15 pm

morphy_richards said:


Microsoft on the other hand have provided their (again I have to say this grudgingly) really rather good .net framework as well as lite versions of their IDE for free! Thus circumnavigating people criminalising themselves just because they want to learn!



can you tell the difrence between a

trick or a treat ?

"Where will Microsoft try to drag you today?"

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halloween_Documents

probably worth having a look at imho

morphy_richards said:


Good business and good for society in general. Well done Microsoft! (bah humbug)


sound like madness to me

understandable-madness

is still madness
Real life is, to most, a long second-best, a perpetual compromise between the ideal and the possible.
-
Meanwhile, the sysadmin who accidentally nuked the data reckons "its best not run anything more with sudo today"
-
what about spike milligan?

Raspberry wino
Posts: 49
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 11:48 am

Re: What chance the Raspi against the might of Microsoft

Mon Oct 22, 2012 10:55 pm

morphy_richards wrote:Microsoft on the other hand have provided their (again I have to say this grudgingly) really rather good .net framework as well as lite versions of their IDE for free! Thus circumnavigating people criminalising themselves just because they want to learn!

Good business and good for society in general. Well done Microsoft! (bah humbug)
It's a loss leader, like a dealer hanging around school gates giving small amounts of drugs to kids to establish a habit.

Of course letting MS or Google get invovled in UK education is a daft idea. Why help stifle competition and disadvantage thousands of smaller companies and organisations by locking our kids' future into closed markets when they're vulnerable and don't see the issues?

People who want to increase the concentration of commercial power in such foreign corporations to the detriment of genuine open source education instead of teaching principles of hardware and software and non-propietary languages have probably already been bought.

Madness.

User avatar
morphy_richards
Posts: 1603
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2012 3:26 pm
Location: Epping Forest
Contact: Website

Re: What chance the Raspi against the might of Microsoft

Thu Oct 25, 2012 7:13 pm

Raspberry wino wrote: People who want to increase the concentration of commercial power in such foreign corporations to the detriment of genuine open source education instead of teaching principles of hardware and software and non-propietary languages have probably already been bought.
.
Thanks for restarting this, I was enjoying the debate!
I cant remember who it was who pointed this out originally on here (Scep possibly), but the "reboot" and of ICT into "Digital Literacy" and "Computer Science" is in no small part down to the lobbying of big foreign corporations. It was Eric Schmidt who provided one of the main soundbites for this with his comments about how the UK is in grave danger of abandoning it's heritage as the pioneer of computing. (As well as a lot of hard work from CAS, BCS and the Royal Society). (And conspiracy theorists like me who think Rupert Murdoch's corporations recent disgrace may have played a small part too, but I wont go into that) The result is that we can weed out a lot of the cr** from ICT and stick with the useful stuff and that's "digital literacy." And we get to teach proper computer science, even better than the "computer studies" lessons I used to do at school with BBC micro's back in the 80's and early 90's.

So what happened there exactly..?

Big corporations like MS and Google worked for in harmony with the little guys. A lot of the OS community and smaller companies are represented by BCS and the others. On their own as individual companies and sole developers they are too small to be heard, but when they join forces in an organisation such as BCS their combined shout's become pretty damn loud.

Add too it that the clamor raised by the people with big bucks and the shout is unignorable. The persistent work on this from academics, businesses and the final push from the big corps turned the balance.

What we actually have now is a big blank book that needs to be filled. There is nothing and nobody who is saying "you must use this propriety software" or whatever - I know this is a fact because I am in it now trying to help to fill the book in my own small way.

What we can have is advertising and salespeople trying to sell us stuff and believe me every day I have a small forest worth of junk mail in my pigeon hole from little companies who are trying to sell me their own solution to the "no computer science teaching resources" problem. MS is marketing their own stuff too but no one is forcing anyone to use any of it!

I had a great day today, I have a new student teacher with me, brand new into schools and very green behind the ears. He's going to be one of the last generation of IT graduates who can be trained as from next year they will all have to be Computer Science grads. Anyway, he did a bit of Java in the past and hated it. He's now getting into making a programming scheme of work for year 7's / 11 year olds.
I stuck him on http://www.learnpython.org for a bit , stipulated that first he had to do hello world, then do what is your name? hello your name.
Got him to look at lists and arrays, a few basic loops and then showed him "hunt the wumpus". Took about 30 minutes.

His project is to develop a sequence of lessons to introduce these basic tenants and then make an extended project where students will have to develop their own text based adventure game which is similar to this old classic. He went from being a bit of a programming-phobe to enthusiastic in a couple of hours and managed to future proof his career ... rambling on a bit now, anyway, stuff like that will feed back into his university, will raise the profile of none-MS stuff - but - and this is important - folks will evaluate and weigh up all the ways of doing things, be it Python, C or even MS Smallbasic and they will all be in contention, this will be an ongoing phenomenon too, I don't see things going back to a situation like "ICT is just Microsoft stuff"

I dont think it's particularly constructive to disregard a system just because it's made by a big company instead of a small one. Let's face it, the small companies all dream of being big ones anyway and from where I am dangling on the chalkface right now it looks to me as if the playing field is about as level and competitive as it's possible to be.

pygmy_giant
Posts: 1562
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 12:49 am

Re: What chance the Raspi against the might of Microsoft

Thu Oct 25, 2012 8:03 pm

Interesting.

If you pretend you are looking for a job 'in computers' and examine the skill set that employers ask for it seems less 'Microsofty' than it used to be. I think companies can find fewer reasons to shell out for MS software solutions now that there are more open-source/comunity-based solutions available for free/minimal cost.

Software trends move so fast there seems to me to be no point schooling kids in this package or that package - better just teach them the underpinning principles and alow them to create using whatever flavour of tools are most accessible at the time, because employer's preferances will have changed by the time they are looking for a job. Kids will benefit most from being taught flexability and adaptability towards programming/IT. Problem solving and transferable skills are what its all about.

Return to “Staffroom, classroom and projects”