Robin Bron
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 11:50 am

Re: Working Enviroment Documentation

Tue Jan 03, 2012 12:59 pm

Reading through the website (including FAQ, wiki and forum), I've come to notice that I did not see any working inviroment documentation.

For example, at what temperature range can the Pi be operated or stored.

Yet temperature range is not the only thing I'm looking for, either am I looking for humidity range, memory leaks (I'm planning on introducing the Pi into the company I work for, where it will be used as a data receiver and manipulator for a microcontroller, and in other products it would be the graphics generator).

I know there already has been asked for a benchmark on the GPU, so I will just wait for the results.

All I/O the Pi is missing is an RS242 and WLAN, which can be added by USB, even if I had to write the drivers myself.

So, for shorts:

Is there any documentation on working inviroments of the Raspberry Pi?

If not, will there be, or do I have to find out myself?

When bought, is the user allowed to build the Raspberry Pi into an official product, and sell it in that way? (If needed, this will all be listed in the documentation of the product.)

Thanks in advance,

Robin Bron

Data-Display Netherlands

jamesh
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 28358
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:41 pm

Re: Working Enviroment Documentation

Tue Jan 03, 2012 1:17 pm

Most of what you have asked is in the forums somewhere, but might be a pain to search for.

You are more than welcome to build the Raspi in to your own product, eprhaps with a RaspberryPi inside sticker!!??

WLan works fine with the USB Wifi devices I have tested. List on the Wiki.

The SoC is thoroughly tested in quite a range on environments, however, with the memory PoP package it does reduce the range somewhat. I'm not sure of the exact figures, but they are in the forum somewhere. Once built on to the boards, I think the ethernet/USB device is the weak link - it has a smaller range.
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Robin Bron
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 11:50 am

Re: Working Enviroment Documentation

Fri Jan 06, 2012 10:36 am

I think I've found it, but lost again though.

One stated it would have like an avarage ARM system, from 0 to 60, and another stated it would have a range like an industrial ARM system, from -20 to 70.

If it would have indeed have a range of -20 to 70, it would be the ideal computer to use, seeming even though its small footprint and low cost, it still has more than enough processing power, RAM and GPU power (Although it's now fully certain what power it has, I understood from multiple topics and posts.)

Anyway, thank you for your help,

Robin Bron

Data-Display Netherlands

mightygoose
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 1:53 pm
Contact: Website

Re: Working Enviroment Documentation

Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:12 am

interestingly what happens if you were to expose to Raspi to say -60C, why would it cease to function? surely it would work more efficiently.

Robin Bron
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 11:50 am

Re: Working Enviroment Documentation

Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:23 am

An electronical device, although the "rule" you implied does count in most cases, will probably receive a lower electrical resistance from being kept at lower temperatures.

In pretty much any case, there are weak points in the design (including cooling), which would relatively easy break in, for example, case of conducting too much current.

So even if you kept it at -60, there would be some points near or over the maximum temperature it has been rated for probably caused by an excess of current, which was again caused by lower electrical resistance from the lower temperatures.

Even if it would hold on funtioning, it would draw alot more power than it would normally do.

Still, it's not the cold end I'm interested in for using it, but the hot side, because I need a computer which is able to withstand at least +70 of ambient temperature.

Just a note:
all temperature ratings I use without saying Celsius or Farenheidt, are Celsius.

jacklang
Posts: 166
Joined: Thu Aug 04, 2011 10:59 am

Re: Working Enviroment Documentation

Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:35 am

The Pi is built from commercial chips, for example the LAN9512 are specified as 0C to +70C. Some may work outside of that range, but no promises, and there may be reliability problems

mightygoose
Posts: 85
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2012 1:53 pm
Contact: Website

Re: Working Enviroment Documentation

Fri Jan 06, 2012 11:56 am

i not thinking of prolonged exposure... i just wanted to know how serious i need to be about insulation...

[linkie]

kasperl
Posts: 90
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2012 6:20 pm

Re: Working Enviroment Documentation

Fri Jan 06, 2012 6:55 pm

Quick note on the RS232: The UART pins are already on the GPIO header, and as far as I can see/understand, you'd probably only need to add the electronics to pull up the voltage to RS232 levels. Not sure about hardware handshaking, you haven't got DTR or RTS headers, just TXD and RXD. Still, I think the drivers for that would be a lot more trivial then writing the stuff a USB serial connector needs.

What kind of appliances will you be building these in, that get that hot?

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