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jahboater
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Re: The Rust debate.

Fri Oct 04, 2019 5:18 pm

Sal55,
sal55 wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 12:13 pm
My first exposure to programming was at college in the mid-70s on a machine with a 36-bit word size
Honeywell mainframe by any chance? I used B on one of those (yes 36 bit "words" only).

C promotes smaller types to "int" before arithmetic. Int is whatever size is naturally best for the machine. I presume the original development PDP had type int as 16 bits, nowadays its normally 32-bits.

Anyway, on smaller 8/16-bit machines you do not get the costly 32-bit arithmetic all the time, it would be done in 16-bits.

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rpdom
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Re: The Rust debate.

Fri Oct 04, 2019 6:40 pm

jahboater wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 5:18 pm
Sal55,
sal55 wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 12:13 pm
My first exposure to programming was at college in the mid-70s on a machine with a 36-bit word size
Honeywell mainframe by any chance? I used B on one of those (yes 36 bit "words" only).
It was for me, and although I mostly used COBOL or assembler, I did a fair bit of B on some of those. Some Fortran and BASIC too.
Unreadable squiggle

sal55
Posts: 63
Joined: Sat Sep 21, 2019 7:15 pm

Re: The Rust debate.

Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:21 pm

jahboater wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 5:18 pm

Honeywell mainframe by any chance? I used B on one of those (yes 36 bit "words" only).

C promotes smaller types to "int" before arithmetic. Int is whatever size is naturally best for the machine. I presume the original development PDP had type int as 16 bits, nowadays its normally 32-bits.
No, it was a DEC PDP10 (I understand it was popular in education). We used the usual Algol 60, Fortran, Cobol and Pascal (replacing Algol). I also used MACRO10, its assembler, to create my first compiler.

No sign of C however (not even on PDP11 which I also used). I didn't meet it many years later, after at least a decade of using my own systems language 'in-house'. (And I can't have been impressed as I carried on developing my own languages. Actually I have pretty much always done so, and still am.)

What I did hear later about C on PDP10 was that some used 9-bit bytes (4x9 bits per word). Wouldn't that be great now? (PDP10s were not byte-addressable, but some had byte packing and unpacking instructions, allowing 'byte' sizes of 1 to 36 bits. For packed text, we normally used 6x6 bits (ASCII subset) or 5x7 bits (ASCII) in each word.

And, yes, a 16-bit machine will likely have had 16-bit 'int' types, as would an 8-bit one actually. But while my 'int' has progressed from 16 to 32 to 64, most C's seem to have capped it at 32-bits.

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CypherOz
Posts: 48
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Re: The Rust debate.

Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:57 pm

sal55 wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 9:21 pm
jahboater wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 5:18 pm

Honeywell mainframe by any chance? I used B on one of those (yes 36 bit "words" only).

C promotes smaller types to "int" before arithmetic. Int is whatever size is naturally best for the machine. I presume the original development PDP had type int as 16 bits, nowadays its normally 32-bits.
No, it was a DEC PDP10 (I understand it was popular in education). We used the usual Algol 60, Fortran, Cobol and Pascal (replacing Algol). I also used MACRO10, its assembler, to create my first compiler.
Interesting ... for me starting early 70's IBM 1130, IBM 370/115 (BASIC, APL, Fortran and Assembler); ICL 1900 (COBOL, PLAN, ALGOL on George 3 OS); CDC Cyber 173(Fortran, COBOL, Pascal); then DEC PDP 11 (DIBOL, Later COBOL, MACRO11) then VAXen (COBOL, MACRO32, and C) -- quite diverse before I got to Unix systems in the later 80's onwards.
--
Regards, Kym
Retired software bloke from Adelaide, South Australia

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