Korishan
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:30 am

Wifi Multi-Band Router

Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:39 am

First time poster here

I know that the RPi is a very powerful little computer. My uncle has been looking at the Linksys AC5400 Tri-Band Router. It runs on the 802.011ac which allows it to do beamforming.
What I'm wondering is, is it possible to take an RPi, install a full OS like pfSense or another, add in some Wifi adapters that support AC, and be able to get it to be programmed with Tri-Band?
Or even to be able to install multiple adapters and have them all be on the same ssid? I know that it is possible to have several routers have the same ssid and as the person moves from zone to zone, the connection moves to the other router (ie. Walmart, Publix, Sam's Club, etc)

Could we do the same thing with an PRi with multiple adapters and accomplish the same thing?

His current WiFi setup is an older Linksys. They have at least 6-10 devices connecting to it, plus 2 microwaves, and several walls to each of the rooms. The router is centrally located, but there's still issues. The router is maxed. The Linksys AC5400 is over $200. Looking for a cheaper, more powerful and customizable option.

Thanks,
Kori

epoch1970
Posts: 3873
Joined: Thu May 05, 2016 9:33 am
Location: Paris, France

Re: Wifi Multi-Band Router

Fri Jun 30, 2017 4:02 pm

A Pi 3 is customizable, perhaps cheaper (?? after add-ons ??) but certainly not more powerful as a network platform. The CPU is good, IO/s are poor.
Look for a device optimised for networking.
"S'il n'y a pas de solution, c'est qu'il n'y a pas de problème." Les Shadoks, J. Rouxel

grats
Posts: 30
Joined: Fri Apr 25, 2014 6:51 am
Location: Colorado, USA

Re: Wifi Multi-Band Router

Mon Jul 03, 2017 8:22 pm

Korishan wrote:First time poster here

I know that the RPi is a very powerful little computer. My uncle has been looking at the Linksys AC5400 Tri-Band Router. It runs on the 802.011ac which allows it to do beamforming.
What I'm wondering is, is it possible to take an RPi, install a full OS like pfSense or another, add in some Wifi adapters that support AC, and be able to get it to be programmed with Tri-Band?
Or even to be able to install multiple adapters and have them all be on the same ssid? I know that it is possible to have several routers have the same ssid and as the person moves from zone to zone, the connection moves to the other router (ie. Walmart, Publix, Sam's Club, etc)

Could we do the same thing with an PRi with multiple adapters and accomplish the same thing?

His current WiFi setup is an older Linksys. They have at least 6-10 devices connecting to it, plus 2 microwaves, and several walls to each of the rooms. The router is centrally located, but there's still issues. The router is maxed. The Linksys AC5400 is over $200. Looking for a cheaper, more powerful and customizable option.

Thanks,
Kori
Those are not routers. Those are access points.
Routers do not have a wireless signal at all. Routers route. For home use it is converting an external IP address into internal address space allowing many devices under network address translation (NAT)

if you want many access points, you should go with ubiquiti devices. You can use their router (not as easy to configure as it's actually a router, not garbage home hybrid) or you can use your current router.. and then get multiple access points around your home or property.
https://www.amazon.com/Ubiquiti-NanoSta ... 004EGI3CI/
This specific one I cover multiple properties, some about half a mile in distance with multiple repeats.

If you want a seamless switching of clients (as you walk it goes to strongest access point) you'll want to have all of them configured on the same channel and the same name.

Oh and as said above, I wouldn't use a raspberry pi for that. Bananapi has a board specific for pfsense but I wouldn't use that either.
Majority of home routers have routers, access points, and switches built in. Some have modems as well those are especially bad at performance ;)

tarjei99
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:14 pm

Re: Wifi Multi-Band Router

Wed Aug 23, 2017 3:53 pm

I think that it would be better to consider another reasonably priced router instead of a RPI3. Mainly to get better antennae. I think ASUS and T-Link are supposed to be good, but I suggest a more thorough investigation before buying.

The RPI can probably run pkSense or OPNsense, but those really needs hardenedBSD installed which is a FreeBSD variety. There is a port for the RPI3 somewhere. It is not currently official. I understand that you can use FreeBSD, but that requires renaming of the kernel before reboot.

https://hardenedbsd.org/ may have unofficial image for RPI3
http://www.raspbsd.org/ have FreeBSD v12 images for RPI2 and RPI3.

FreeBSD v 11 image for Raspberry PI 2
ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/relea ... AGES/11.1/

FreeBSD v 12 images for 64bit Raspberri PI 3
ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD/snaps ... AGES/12.0/

I am uncertain if hardenedBSD is an absolute requirement for OPNsense.

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