tbd.pi
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Location: NJ,USA
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Electronics and Circuitry - Recommended reading

Wed Sep 17, 2014 8:59 pm

It's been a long time since I played with electronics. I'm comfortable with working with software and picking up python or whatever I need, but I really want to understand more about the electronics side. I've managed to get a few leds lighting up following guides but I've seen it done several ways with/without resistors etc. That I feel I would be happier if I could figure out basic circuits for myself.

What reading/resources would you recommend for getting up to speed with circuits. I've looked at RPi for Dummies, but I can't preview the chapters I want.

I hope I haven't missed anything completely obvious as far as stickies etc.

Any recommendations?

boyoh
Posts: 1341
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2012 3:30 pm
Location: Selby. North Yorkshire .UK

Re: Electronics and Circuitry - Recommended reading

Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:27 pm

tbd.pi wrote:It's been a long time since I played with electronics. I'm comfortable with working with software and picking up python or whatever I need, but I really want to understand more about the electronics side. I've managed to get a few leds lighting up following guides but I've seen it done several ways with/without resistors etc. That I feel I would be happier if I could figure out basic circuits for myself.

What reading/resources would you recommend for getting up to speed with circuits. I've looked at RPi for Dummies, but I can't preview the chapters I want.

I hope I haven't missed anything completely obvious as far as stickies etc.

Any recommendations?
Leaning electronics is a very worthwhile hobby
But you must start from the bottom . Building
Circuits on a breadboard is a starting point
I see you live in the USA, The land of the
Silicon Chip, So information should be
Plentyfull,
Do you still have" Radio Shack " stores
For electronics components & books
Books by " Forrest M. Mims III " called
" Engineer's Mini - Notebooks " All very good.

Regards BoyOh.
BoyOh ( Selby, North Yorkshire.UK)
Some Times Right Some Times Wrong

ShiftPlusOne
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
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Re: Electronics and Circuitry - Recommended reading

Wed Sep 17, 2014 10:38 pm


tbd.pi
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2012 11:21 am
Location: NJ,USA
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Re: Electronics and Circuitry - Recommended reading

Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:49 am

Thanks for the recommendations.

Yep, Radio-Shack just about still exists, I've made many visits there the last couple of days for equipment.

I'm not the sort of person that can just follow what I'm told and get satisfaction from the results. Yes, I'm impressed by seeing LEDs on a board light up, but I don't believe I've had much input if I've just followed a diagram and don't understand what I'm looking at!

W. H. Heydt
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Location: Vallejo, CA (US)

Re: Electronics and Circuitry - Recommended reading

Thu Sep 18, 2014 2:05 am

tbd.pi wrote:Thanks for the recommendations.

Yep, Radio-Shack just about still exists, I've made many visits there the last couple of days for equipment.

I'm not the sort of person that can just follow what I'm told and get satisfaction from the results. Yes, I'm impressed by seeing LEDs on a board light up, but I don't believe I've had much input if I've just followed a diagram and don't understand what I'm looking at!
Probably what you want to do, in that case, is to take a full and careful look at an existing circuit until you understand how (and, more importantly, why) it works. Then modify it to suit your needs. If your modification doesn't work, you can then try to figure out why your changes caused it to fail.

As to the general topic... Most electronics these days breaks down to one of 2 types of circuits: Linear/Analog vs. digital. Sometimes you can do some weird hybrids...like the time I wired my wife's hair with blinking *incandescent* lights ("grain of wheat" bulbs...being white--"white LEDs" didn't exist then--bright, and omnidirectional; they were commonly used in model railroad work) driven by a digital circuit consisting of quad dual-input NAND gate (acting as a clock with a 1 sec cycle) and a decade counter/decoder. I will leave it to the reader how do this and power it with 2 AAA batteries...so there are no wires down the back of the neck.

boyoh
Posts: 1341
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2012 3:30 pm
Location: Selby. North Yorkshire .UK

Re: Electronics and Circuitry - Recommended reading

Thu Sep 18, 2014 1:25 pm

tbd.pi wrote:Thanks for the recommendations.

Yep, Radio-Shack just about still exists, I've made many visits there the last couple of days for equipment.

I'm not the sort of person that can just follow what I'm told and get satisfaction from the results. Yes, I'm impressed by seeing LEDs on a board light up, but I don't believe I've had much input if I've just followed a diagram and don't understand what I'm looking at!


-------------------( 700R )----------------------------
9v+--------------vvvvvv------------a LED k------0-
-------------------( 7v )-----------( 2v )-------

This will help you to understand how a LED is connected
And how it works
The LED is a diode if forward biased ( Anode to Kathode )
With a suitable voltage & current will glow
There are limitations to the voltage and current that LED
Require to work. Usually a voltage between 1.7v & 2.5v
And a current between 5ma & 20ma will work ok
The example circuit above as the LED working
With a forward voltage of 2v and a current of 10ma.

Ohms Law 9v - 2v = 7v /0.01 = 700ohm ( Pick nearest Value )
What you have don is dropped 7v across the resister
Leving 2v across the LED . This is don by dropping
7v across the resistor by passing a current of 10ma
Through It.
To pick the Wattage of the resistor= The voltage dropped
Across the resistor by the current flowing through it
7v x 0.01 = 0.07watt
BoyOh ( Selby, North Yorkshire.UK)
Some Times Right Some Times Wrong

tbd.pi
Posts: 34
Joined: Sat Aug 11, 2012 11:21 am
Location: NJ,USA
Contact: Website

Re: Electronics and Circuitry - Recommended reading

Fri Sep 19, 2014 1:07 pm

Thank-you for the example, and thank-you for the recommendations.

I'm really looking forward to "getting this" and being able to think up some designs of my own. But, crawling first.

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Laurens-wuyts
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Re: Electronics and Circuitry - Recommended reading

Fri Sep 19, 2014 4:20 pm

Maybe this is something for you to learn the schematics.
http://www.instructables.com/id/HOW-TO- ... -DIAGRAMS/

Laurens

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