TheDoctor1212
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What can I use for a power supply?

Sun Apr 28, 2013 8:00 am

Hello,

I am kinda confused as to what I need for a power supply, can someone help me out? Will a standard android phone charger plugged into an adapter work? Is it the right sized plug? I also have a NDS Light charger which is 5.2V and 450Ma will that charge it, or does it have the wrong plug? If yuo cannot answer my questions a link to a charger for the raspberry pi that can just plug one end in to a power socket and the other into the rpi would be great.

Thanks,

TheDoctor1212

drgeoff
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Sun Apr 28, 2013 3:42 pm

1. You should get something that supplies 5 volts (regulated) at 1A (or more current) and has a micro-USB plug. (A micro-USB plug is not the same as a mini-USB plug.)

2. The NDS charger would not be suitable.

3. Unless you are happy to travel up to half way around the globe to a store or pay a small fortune in postage charges, I suggest you give us a clue as to where you are.

sdjf
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Sun Apr 28, 2013 7:32 pm

My Pi is functioning just fine with a Motorola cellphone charger than only delivers 850mA. 1000mA is not necessary for the Pi's power port, it will only take 700mA. Having a power supply with more than that is just insurance in case the power supply does not deliver as many mA as it claims to deliver.

A lot of people prefer just powering their Pi's from their powered USB hubs, that may be a source of some of your confusion.

You need to make sure that your cellphone chargers will deliver the 700mA or they will not work. And the other factor is the connector. There should be some good information on the following page, look at it to see if anyone has posted information about your particular chargers.

http://elinux.org/RPi_VerifiedPeripherals

Then, about the plugs, if your plugs do not fit the micro-usb socket, you could buy a converter, but it might be cheaper to just get another, approved power supply. In the USA, I got a Motorola charger from the Verified Peripherals list for around $3 in the USA from either ebay or amazon, I do not recall which.
FORUM TIP: To view someone's posting history, sign in, click on their user name, then on "Search User's Posts." || Running ArchLinuxArm on Model 2B and 512MB Model B

TheDoctor1212
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Tue Apr 30, 2013 10:23 pm

Thanks for the help! BTW I'm in Australia.

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Mr.Dave
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Tue Apr 30, 2013 10:53 pm

Nokia Lumia 710 Charger, 5v - 1200mA

terrytheandroid
Posts: 15
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2013 1:38 am

Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Wed May 01, 2013 1:56 am

Make sure you have a full 1A power supply. If not, you are likely to build up SD card corruption which you may not notice until your system is effectively trashed. I've had the problem and the 1A supply fixed it

tmcglasgow
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Mon Jul 22, 2013 10:47 am

Six Raspberry pi's on one wall. Prefer one power supply.
I need mains power running 24/7 for three weeks?
Any guidance or recommendations?

T

drgeoff
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Mon Jul 22, 2013 7:19 pm

tmcglasgow wrote:Six Raspberry pi's on one wall. Prefer one power supply.
I need mains power running 24/7 for three weeks?
Any guidance or recommendations?

T
If you mean you might need a battery capable of acting as the only supply or as a backup to mains for a period of three weeks, then that will be a large battery.

A back of fag packet calculation:

6 RPi's with no USB peripherals will require about 3 amps at 5 volts = 15 watts.
For 3 weeks of 24/7 operation (= 500 hours) consumption will be 7500 watt hours.
Consider a moderate size car battery is 60 amp-hours at 12 volts ie 720 watt hours.
So even assuming the 12 volt to 5 volt DC-DC converter is 100% efficient that would need more than 10 such batteries. In practice I'd suggest upping that by at least 50% and maybe even 100%.

Other battery technologies are available but this is still a sizeable requirement. Certainly isn't going to be met by a few Li-Ion mobile phone cells or even those 'USB power banks'.

hda
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Sat Nov 02, 2013 8:08 pm

To use a Huawei E173 for active transmission, 1.2A (6W) is not enough & reliable.
Therefore I stepped up to 2.5A (12.5W) succesfully.

comjosh64
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Dec 26, 2013 2:35 am

Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Sat Dec 28, 2013 6:46 am

Just wanted to share my experience this evening. I got lazy and didn't want to dig out the power adapter I had been using since I got my Rpi a few days ago. I grabbed an old charger that claimed to produce 800mA. I thought that the requirement was 700mA so I figured it would work fine.

I was able to boot into the GUI (Raspbian) but I was experience some strange lag, hanging, freezing. It seemed like the CPU was being taxed. I didn't realize it was a power issue at first. After I formatted my SD card, re-installed the OS (twice, I got partition error the first time) I realized I was getting the same lag even in the command line. It would work fine for a few seconds, then be unresponsive for about the same amount of time. I thought for sure I had destroyed my pi somehow. I had just finished modifying an old floppy ribbon cable to fit the GPIO pins. I hadn't even powered it on, but maybe I broke a solder getting it out of the case (my original logic). I couldn't find any threads describing the symptoms, I ended up swapping back to my original charger as a last ditch effort and THAT WAS THE PROBLEM!

I hope I didn't fry my 16gb SD card in the process of figuring out such a simple yet critical mistake :/ I'm waiting for a THIRD install of the OS since the intermittent response of the last install resulted in a partial password being set. Somehow the timing was perfect that I made the same delay / typo on the confirm password line.

Moral of the story: Use a 1A power supply / charger!!!!! Every time!

Kubbling
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Wed Jan 15, 2014 6:35 pm

Will a Nokia Lumina 520 charger work?

hIrVaRi
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Sat Feb 15, 2014 2:57 pm

Hi, can i use charger with 2 usb slots and 5V, 2.1A? Will it harm raspberry?

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FLYFISH TECHNOLOGIES
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Sat Feb 15, 2014 3:27 pm

Hi,
hIrVaRi wrote:can i use charger with 2 usb slots and 5V, 2.1A?
Yes you can. The reason is that it is actually NOT a charger, but a power supply.
hIrVaRi wrote:Will it harm raspberry?
No.


Best wishes, Ivan Zilic.
Running out of GPIO pins and/or need to read analog values?
Solution: http://www.flyfish-tech.com/FF32

Tarcas
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Mon Feb 17, 2014 4:18 am

Three ways to apply power:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGELwCXeNTs

Responding in particular to hIrVaRi, but for other people with similar questions, this might help:
If you think of electricity like flowing water, this might make more sense and help you remember...
Voltage is like pressure. If you have too little, your equipment won't work, but if you have too much it may be damaged, or even explode. Voltage of the supply must MATCH the input requirements. The Pi takes 5v (actually 4.8 to 5.2, IIRC, but get as close to 5v as you can.) Too much voltage to your equipment is like too much pressure to the toilet. A little more (~9v) and things may break. A lot more (24+v) and you're going to have water on the ceiling. Don't do that.
Current, AKA Amperage is like water flow. Your power supply will supply up to 2.1A of current, but the Pi will only draw about 0.7A. Since the pressure matches, this is safe. When selecting a power supply, the rating must MATCH OR EXCEED the sum of the amperage ratings of all equipment being supplied by it. Going too high is actually good, since you're placing less demand on the equipment than it is designed for, causing less wear and tear. It's like having a bigger supply line to your house... You might not need or use all that capacity, but it won't cause any problems, and you can easily handle certain problems with that supply line.

mikejclark
Posts: 2
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Mon May 05, 2014 2:00 pm

Thank you, Tarcas. Very useful explained like that!
Tarcas wrote:Three ways to apply power:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lGELwCXeNTs

Responding in particular to hIrVaRi, but for other people with similar questions, this might help:
If you think of electricity like flowing water, this might make more sense and help you remember...
Voltage is like pressure. If you have too little, your equipment won't work, but if you have too much it may be damaged, or even explode. Voltage of the supply must MATCH the input requirements. The Pi takes 5v (actually 4.8 to 5.2, IIRC, but get as close to 5v as you can.) Too much voltage to your equipment is like too much pressure to the toilet. A little more (~9v) and things may break. A lot more (24+v) and you're going to have water on the ceiling. Don't do that.
Current, AKA Amperage is like water flow. Your power supply will supply up to 2.1A of current, but the Pi will only draw about 0.7A. Since the pressure matches, this is safe. When selecting a power supply, the rating must MATCH OR EXCEED the sum of the amperage ratings of all equipment being supplied by it. Going too high is actually good, since you're placing less demand on the equipment than it is designed for, causing less wear and tear. It's like having a bigger supply line to your house... You might not need or use all that capacity, but it won't cause any problems, and you can easily handle certain problems with that supply line.

piguy1
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jun 17, 2014 9:20 pm

Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Tue Jun 17, 2014 9:26 pm

Hi everyone,
I am looking for an efficient way to power both a Pi and an LCD module using one AC adaptor. I am about to purchase one of these: https://www.adafruit.com/products/1287

You will note there are three power supply options. Are there any adaptors/splitters etc that I could use to simply divert some power to the Pi? Im a novice and looking for the easiest and cheapest solution...

Thank you for any and all advice!
M

lbrow
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Wed Jun 18, 2014 12:41 am

Micro usb plug

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mahjongg
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Wed Jun 18, 2014 2:06 am

TheDoctor1212 wrote:Hello,

I am kinda confused as to what I need for a power supply, can someone help me out? Will a standard android phone charger plugged into an adapter work? Is it the right sized plug? I also have a NDS Light charger which is 5.2V and 450Ma will that charge it, or does it have the wrong plug? If yuo cannot answer my questions a link to a charger for the raspberry pi that can just plug one end in to a power socket and the other into the rpi would be great.

Thanks,

TheDoctor1212
Basic stuff this, therefore moved to beginners forum!
Read the FAQ, http://www.raspberrypi.org/help/faqs/#powerReqs

also reading the Stickies will help too, especially the pictorial buying guide here
http://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewt ... =63&t=4277 and the starter guide here: http://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewt ... =91&t=4751

P.S.
I also have a NDS Light charger which is 5.2V and 450Ma will that charge it
the PI doesn't need "charging", it needs to be fed a nice stable 5 Volt, regulated within a quarter of a volt, from a supply that can deliver at least one Ampere, (bare minimum is 0.7A, (700 mA) but only if you use frugal USB devices) through a micro_USB input.

That is all the info you will need to know, the rest simply follows from that.

G00sfraba
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Fri Jun 27, 2014 8:36 am

Hello from me too :)
I want to create one Car automation project which involves both Rasppi and Arduino.
My drama is that I am not quite familiar with how the amperage works. Let me explain in detail:
There will be several components, which will be powered separately
1) Rasppi board
2) Arduino board
3) External USB hub
4) Various things controlled by the arduino and the Pi GPIO.

Ok now I have read the specifications for the Rasppi and I am aware that I need 700~1500 mAh which is 0.7 ~ 1.5 Amps
As I am going to build custom power supply which will power all my components there will be several different components in this supply. The component I am planing to use for the Rasppi power supply is this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/gib-Car-Charger ... 1202073503

Now the question is: Is it harmful to connect the Pi to 3A power supply? If yes, what car power supply will I need? Model? AC? DC?
And if somebody can explains to me what is the difference between 1,5 A and 3 A it will be great. I assume it is not important how much the supply gives, but how much the consumer takes out of the supply? The supply is not giving all the 3 Amps 100% of the time, only the amount which the consumer requires?

Cheers,
:)

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FLYFISH TECHNOLOGIES
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Fri Jun 27, 2014 12:43 pm

Hi,
G00sfraba wrote:Is it harmful to connect the Pi to 3A power supply?
Explanation which you'll remember for the rest of life:
- current (power) capability of a power supply equals to capacity of a truck,
- RasPi is cargo load (word "load" is actually used for supplied components/modules).

When your power supply can provide 3A, this equals to the truck's payload capacity of 3 ton.
When RasPi consumes 500mA, it represents a cargo weighting 0.5 ton.

Can you carry 0.5 ton cargo with the 3-ton capacity truck ? Obviously, you can... and there is 2.5 ton capacity left for additional cargo.
Can you harm the 0.5 cargo if it is carried around on the 3-ton capacity truck instead of 1-ton capacity truck ? I don't think so.


Best wishes, Ivan Zilic.
Running out of GPIO pins and/or need to read analog values?
Solution: http://www.flyfish-tech.com/FF32

drgeoff
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Fri Jun 27, 2014 12:48 pm

G00sfraba wrote:Hello from me too :)
I want to create one Car automation project which involves both Rasppi and Arduino.
My drama is that I am not quite familiar with how the amperage works. Let me explain in detail:
There will be several components, which will be powered separately
1) Rasppi board
2) Arduino board
3) External USB hub
4) Various things controlled by the arduino and the Pi GPIO.

Ok now I have read the specifications for the Rasppi and I am aware that I need 700~1500 mAh which is 0.7 ~ 1.5 Amps
As I am going to build custom power supply which will power all my components there will be several different components in this supply. The component I am planing to use for the Rasppi power supply is this: http://www.ebay.com/itm/gib-Car-Charger ... 1202073503

Now the question is: Is it harmful to connect the Pi to 3A power supply? If yes, what car power supply will I need? Model? AC? DC?
And if somebody can explains to me what is the difference between 1,5 A and 3 A it will be great. I assume it is not important how much the supply gives, but how much the consumer takes out of the supply? The supply is not giving all the 3 Amps 100% of the time, only the amount which the consumer requires?

Cheers,
:)
That supply looks OK. Your assumption is correct. The RPi will only take what current (which is measured in Amperes) it needs. As long as the supply is capable of giving at least that. Extra current supplying capability (which is unused) is not not a problem.

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SteveDee
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Fri Jun 27, 2014 1:25 pm

To anyone experiencing RaspberryPi power problems, I'd highly recommend getting yourself a cheap voltmeter (...almost as cheap as a second power supply).

You can then monitor the 5 Volt supply under varying conditions and determine whether you need a more suitable power supply.

My post may help: http://captainbodgit.blogspot.co.uk/201 ... rrypi.html

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nsayer
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Fri Jul 25, 2014 1:34 am

For what it's worth, I make and sell Pi Power, which is a 2A @ 5V DC-DC converter that can take in anything from 6-15 VDC. It sits on the GPIO pins, but has a stacking header so you can plug (and power) something else in too.
Check out my store! http://store.geppettoelectronics.com/

JanoriaCorven
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Wed Mar 09, 2016 9:41 pm

I have a Samsung Galaxy S6 quick charger that provides the following:

Input: 100-240 V~
50-60Hz 0.50 A
Output: 9.0V *funny lines* 1.67A or
5.0V *funny lines* 2.0A.


Would this be sufficient for my Raspberry Pi 3? or would i need something more... official?

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Burngate
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Re: What can I use for a power supply?

Thu Mar 10, 2016 10:23 am

I don't own a Samsung Galaxy S6 phone, and nor have I seen one.
However ...

In your description, "funny lines" may mean something, but a picture might help.
If it's a dotted horizontal line above a solid line, that just means DC rather than AC (which would be indicated by two wavy lines)

5.0V is fine, but your reference to 9.0V would indicate this is not suitable - 9V would destroy your Pi.

If the charger's connector is a micro-usb plug, then the voltage should be 5v, so it should be safe to use.
If not, then you have some work to do to allow it to connect to the Pi safely.

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