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Re: Raspberry Pi- the saviour of Linux?

Posted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 10:35 pm
by peterlowrie
Been using Linux since 1992.

Never will I go back to windoze except to help other hapless users who are not without the temerity to abandon it.

Peter

Re: Raspberry Pi- the saviour of Linux?

Posted: Sat Dec 15, 2012 11:53 pm
by Dweeber
peterlowrie wrote:Been using Linux since 1992.

Never will I go back to windoze except to help other hapless users who are not without the temerity to abandon it.

Peter
I love it when people isolate themselves to one type of platform and attempt to make it do everything they need. Certainly not someone I would look to for support skills in a business computing environment.

I've been using Unix since mid-1980's... I use Win boxes all the time. Using it to post this message right now. Have way too many required apps that simply don't work well enough in a *NIX environment to be worth the hassle or they simply dont work at all. Rather get the work done than play around trying to get it to work. Each type of platform has its place in the grand scheme of things and using the "The right tool for the right job" seems to work best.

The Raspberry Pi is a great little device, but I wouldn't replace my desktop with it, nor would I use it to replace my VPS Internet facing servers. It is a great learning device that will hopefully open the eyes of many young and old alike. Certainly giving me the chance to delve into Electronics in a way I've not had time to in the past, teaching an old dog new tricks.

Hopefully it opens the eyes of people to one of many possible computing environments and doesn't close them off from others.

I have 4 Raspberry Pi's BTW... for various projects.

Re: Raspberry Pi- the saviour of Linux?

Posted: Sun Dec 16, 2012 9:41 am
by gritz
Dweeber wrote:
peterlowrie wrote:Been using Linux since 1992.

Never will I go back to windoze except to help other hapless users who are not without the temerity to abandon it.

Peter
I love it when people isolate themselves to one type of platform and attempt to make it do everything they need. Certainly not someone I would look to for support skills in a business computing environment.

I've been using Unix since mid-1980's... I use Win boxes all the time. Using it to post this message right now. Have way too many required apps that simply don't work well enough in a *NIX environment to be worth the hassle or they simply dont work at all. Rather get the work done than play around trying to get it to work. Each type of platform has its place in the grand scheme of things and using the "The right tool for the right job" seems to work best.

The Raspberry Pi is a great little device, but I wouldn't replace my desktop with it, nor would I use it to replace my VPS Internet facing servers. It is a great learning device that will hopefully open the eyes of many young and old alike. Certainly giving me the chance to delve into Electronics in a way I've not had time to in the past, teaching an old dog new tricks.

Hopefully it opens the eyes of people to one of many possible computing environments and doesn't close them off from others.

I have 4 Raspberry Pi's BTW... for various projects.
Well said, I couldn't be in more agreement with you Dweeber. The Pi was conceived to nurture the next generation of engineering talent and it is a foolish engineer who eschews the use of any available tool simply for dogmatic reasons.

The Pi is obviously exposing a lot of computer users to Linux for the first time and that can only be a good thing IMO as it brings a little evolutionary pressure to bear. In the long run Linux will have to justify itself - it'll no longer be enough just to be free (as in beer) - I fear that Google will increasingly have that particular corner covered. Neither will the open source ethic be enough to make people sign up.

Linux will have to become "cool". And if it can't bring itself to achieve that then it will have to become more transparent. At any rate a new clutch of demanding customers (who aren't averse to spending a bit of money here and there) may induce more hardware and software vendors to port their products to Linux. This may conceivably result in manufacturers and the kernel folks getting together to e.g. create a better audio API and generally allow Linux to be more proactve in the world of 21st century computing.

Or perhaps the Linux faithful are happy with the status quo. This would explain why we haven't seen a slew of highly customised, lightweight and newbie friendly distros with a distinctly "raspberry" flavour. Who knows...

Re: Raspberry Pi- the saviour of Linux?

Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 7:09 am
by goggles
i'm a very new linux user, i've tried a few distros like ubuntu in the past but wasn't ever convinced to switch between a combination of being very afraid of the large walls of text scrolling by on startup followed by an error that i had no idea how to fix resulting in my computer needing to be restarted and the fact that most of the videogames i enjoy are windows exclusive.

this time around i ordered a raspberry pi because i really want to play with the jaguar motor controllers we use at robotics using the gpio ports on the board, and steam is about to be available on linux. now after about two days reading man pages and playing around i've gotten pretty comfortable using linux and i'm getting pretty decent at using the commandline, this afternoon me and a friend spent an hour in inventor drawing up a case for it, after spending most of the time we were drawing that up and the next 4 hours playing around with the pi drooling over all the DIY projects it could be used for my friend decided to order one as well. while i don't think linux needs saving, i do think the pi is going to draw in more people like me and him because its a cheap and simple way to jump into linux that doesn't require trying to duel boot your computer or using something with old flaky hardware that can't keep up with even daily usage tasks.

Re: Raspberry Pi- the saviour of Linux?

Posted: Wed Dec 19, 2012 12:46 pm
by tufty
You're aware, of course, that although Steam is about to be available for Linux, it's *not* about to be available for Linux on the Raspberry Pi, nor is it likely to be, as it needs an x86 processor, which the Pi doesn't have.