Bodelairs
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Apr 08, 2018 12:40 pm

Does pi 3b plus need heatsinks

Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:28 am

Hi all,

Does a Pi 3B plus need heatsinks and a fan for fairly normal use (Coding, Retropie, etc)?

Cheers

T

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B.Goode
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Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2014 4:03 pm
Location: UK

Re: Does pi 3b plus need heatsinks

Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:46 am

Bodelairs wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:28 am


Does a Pi 3B plus need heatsinks and a fan for fairly normal use (Coding, Retropie, etc)?

Just another averagely clueless forum contributor replying.. I may or may not have a clue what I am talking about.

There is nothing in the blog post announcement of the RPi 3b+ https://www.raspberrypi.org/blog/raspbe ... le-now-35/, or the product page https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/ra ... el-b-plus/ about needing heatsinks and a fan. (There is some stuff about how this latest model has more sophisticated thermal dissipation than previous models.)

Nor is it specified as mandatory in the general FAQs: https://www.raspberrypi.org/help/faqs/# ... ceHeatsink

Based on a 6-year 'relationship' with the Raspberry Pi Foundation, using their products and regularly reading these forums I think it is safe to say that if heatsinks and fans were needed for normal use then they would be fitted as standard.

MaxVMH
Posts: 114
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2018 1:26 pm

Re: Does pi 3b plus need heatsinks

Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:58 am

Bodelairs wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:28 am
Hi all,

Does a Pi 3B plus need heatsinks and a fan for fairly normal use (Coding, Retropie, etc)?

Cheers

T

No.

It will throttle when it gets pushed too hard so it should never overheat. So it is safe without heatsink and/or fan. Some people decided to make/install heatsinks and fans to avoid throttling and get better performance.

The new Raspberry Pi 3B+ has an improved design and it takes a lot longer to get to the point of throttling. When throttling happens on the Pi 3B+, the clockspeed will first go from 1,4GHz to 1,2GHz. In the unlikely scenario that it still keeps heating up, it will throttle more.
Last edited by MaxVMH on Fri Apr 13, 2018 10:10 am, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Does pi 3b plus need heatsinks

Fri Apr 13, 2018 10:01 am

Bodelairs wrote:
Fri Apr 13, 2018 9:28 am
Hi all,

Does a Pi 3B plus need heatsinks and a fan for fairly normal use (Coding, Retropie, etc)?

Cheers

T

..for 99.99% of tasks no extra cooling should be required.

...IMO a decent PSU should be more concern than heat dissipation.
Retired disgracefully.....
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HawaiianPi
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Re: Does pi 3b plus need heatsinks

Fri Apr 13, 2018 11:31 am

The new 3B+ controls heat better than the old 3B model, but if you want to push it hard for extended periods at max performance (no thermal throttling), then some additional cooling might be needed. However, fans and heatsinks are not necessarily the best solution.
  • The tiny heatsinks sold for use on the Pi are not very effective, especially since many of them are supplied with ordinary plastic tape (not thermal adhesive).
  • Fans are noisy, require additional power, and over time they will fill your system with dust.
A better solution is the Flirc generation 2 case for the Raspberry Pi3B.
Image

New shipments of the case now include a thinner thermal pad that allows it to fit the newer 3B+ model.
Image

I've had one of my Pi3B computers in a Flirc since last November (2017), and I recently put my new 3B+ in the case pictured above. As you can see in the second picture the case has an internal post that makes contact with the SoC (CPU+GPU), so the whole upper shell of the case acts as a huge heatsink to keep your Pi cool without the noise or dust of a fan.

The only drawback to the Flirc is that the GPIO is not readily accessible. There is a slot in the bottom to pass GPIO connection wires out of the case, but if you are experimenting and frequently change GPIO connections it could be inconvenient. Common IDE type ribbon cables will not fit because the mounting holes are too close to the GPIO header, but "DuPont" style cables will work.

The Flirc Gen2 case for the Pi3B/3B+ is my favorite case (I've tried several different cases). It looks great, cools well, and isn't even all that expensive. I got my first one on a Lightning Deal for $11.95, and the one I bought recently was $15.95 (which is the normal price).
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