opale7000
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:37 pm

Going headless for standalone project.

Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:44 pm

Hello

Before I embark on the Raspberry pi journey I would like to understand the following. My intent is to run a raspberry pi in an electronic project of some sort. Can someone provide me with a high level view of the steps required to go from point A to point B? Do I need to install Raspien first and hook up an HDMI monitor and keyboard? Then do my development and testing? Then go headless?

Or can I go headless immediately, program and test?

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HawaiianPi
Posts: 2663
Joined: Mon Apr 08, 2013 4:53 am
Location: Aloha, Oregon USA

Re: Going headless for standalone project.

Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:37 pm

You should be able to go headless from first boot, with a little prep. Raspbian has SSH disabled by default for security, and wireless connections aren't as simple as connecting an Ethernet cable, but you can set up a Pi to run completely headless.

This is the procedure I use for setting up headless boot with SSH and wireless network. It works with Raspbian Jessie or Stretch, Desktop or Lite, and with the built-in WiFi on the Pi3B & Zero W, or a Raspbian compatible USB WiFi dongle on other models (tested on an old model B, Pi2 and Pi Zero). Everything is done before you boot the SD card, and can be done on a Windows or Mac computer which only has access to the small FAT32 "boot" partition of a Raspbian imaged SD card.
  1. Grab the latest Raspbian image from https://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads/raspbian/
  2. Grab the Etcher software from https://etcher.io/
  3. Install Etcher and use it to write the Raspbian image to your SD card. You don't need to extract the image or format the card prior to writing. Just choose the Raspbian .zip, pick your SD card and write (if you have trouble, verify the SHA256 checksum of the download).
  4. Remove and reinsert the SD card so that your Windows or Mac PC can see the small FAT32 partition on the SD card (labelled "boot").
    If you get a message telling you the card must be formatted, cancel it.
  5. On the small FAT32 "boot" partition, create a file with the name ssh (or ssh.txt). It can be empty, the contents don't matter.
  6. If you are connecting the Pi to your router with an Ethernet cable, you can eject the card and use it to boot your Pi now.
  7. To connect to a wireless network, create another file on the card called wpa_supplicant.conf, which has the following inside:

    Code: Select all

    ctrl_interface=DIR=/var/run/wpa_supplicant GROUP=netdev
    update_config=1
    country=US
    
    network={
         ssid="Your network name/SSID"
         psk="Your WPA/WPA2 security key"
         key_mgmt=WPA-PSK
    }
    Edit country=, ssid= and psk= with your information and save the file.
  8. Make sure that both files are in the root directory of the small FAT32 partition, not in any folder.
  9. Safely eject the card from your PC and use it to boot the Pi.
If Raspbian finds an ssh file it will enable SSH and delete the file. If it finds a wpa_supplicant.conf file, it will move it to its correct location and connect to your wireless network. Give your Pi some time to boot and connect to your network (the first boot always takes a bit longer), then you should be able to SSH into the Pi and configure it how you like.

If you have attempted this and failed then unplugged the power to turn off your Pi, you should start over with a freshly imaged card. Improperly powering down the Pi can cause SSH key generation to fail, which will prevent SSH logins.

If you have a Zeroconf network service installed (Apple's iTunes, Bonjour or Quicktime install Zeroconf), you can SSH into [email protected] (provided you don't have any other Pi computers on your network with the same default hostname). Otherwise you must SSH into your Pi's IP address, which you can find my logging into your router and checking the list of connected clients, or using a network scanner app (like Fing for smartphones) to find your Pi on your network.

To login using SSH from Windows, you can use an app called PuTTY, which looks like this.
Image

In the Host Name (or IP address) field, enter either,

Code: Select all

[email protected]
or
[email protected]{your Pi's IP address}
make sure SSH is selected (it should be by default) and click on Open.

If you have done everything correctly, a terminal window will open and you should see a password request. Although, if it's the first time you've connected to your Pi, you may have to answer "yes" to a security question, and then you'll get the password prompt. After login you'll get a warning about having SSH enabled with the default password, so type passwd[Enter] and enter a new password (twice). And now you can do whatever you need to configure your little Raspberry Pi computer.
My mind is like a browser. 27 tabs are open, 9 aren't responding,
lots of pop-ups...and where is that annoying music coming from?

fruitoftheloom
Posts: 17299
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:40 pm

Re: Going headless for standalone project.

Thu Feb 22, 2018 8:38 pm

opale7000 wrote:
Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:44 pm
Hello

Before I embark on the Raspberry pi journey I would like to understand the following. My intent is to run a raspberry pi in an electronic project of some sort. Can someone provide me with a high level view of the steps required to go from point A to point B? Do I need to install Raspien first and hook up an HDMI monitor and keyboard? Then do my development and testing? Then go headless?

Or can I go headless immediately, program and test?

Yes create a Raspbian Stretch OS SD Card using Etcher:

https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentati ... /README.md

https://www.raspberrypi.org/documentati ... ccess/ssh/
Adieu

opale7000
Posts: 25
Joined: Thu Feb 22, 2018 6:37 pm

Re: Going headless for standalone project.

Fri Feb 23, 2018 5:24 pm

Thanks for the input.Much appreciated, :D

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