Lenkiewicz
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2016 7:15 pm

Different Linux OS versions

Wed Mar 23, 2016 7:34 pm

Hi,

If I want to change the operating system on my Raspberry Pi 3, how should I go about this? Is it as simple as swapping the SD card?

I'd like to play with Ubuntu and Mint if possible, I currently have the default Raspbian installed.

Many thanks,

L.

fruitoftheloom
Posts: 20485
Joined: Tue Mar 25, 2014 12:40 pm
Location: Delightful Dorset

Re: Different Linux OS versions

Wed Mar 23, 2016 11:45 pm

Lenkiewicz wrote:Hi,

If I want to change the operating system on my Raspberry Pi 3, how should I go about this? Is it as simple as swapping the SD card?

I'd like to play with Ubuntu and Mint if possible, I currently have the default Raspbian installed.

Many thanks,

L.
Yes swap cards is easiest, though there is no ARMHF Version of Linux Mint, but there is Ubuntu-Mate:

https://ubuntu-mate.org/raspberry-pi
Retired disgracefully.....

Lenkiewicz
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2016 7:15 pm

Re: Different Linux OS versions

Thu Mar 24, 2016 5:54 am

Thank you!

nicemachines
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Apr 03, 2016 8:28 pm

Re: Different Linux OS versions

Wed Jul 13, 2016 8:08 pm

Agreed, micro cards are cheap now. Pi's are cheap, I am in the process of stacking three Pi's on top of each other and have a bootable card on the first Pi to boot to any of the other Pi's. Extreme, I know! http://www.nicemachines.com to keep up on the updates of this.

User avatar
r3d4
Posts: 967
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 8:21 am
Location: ./

Re: Different Linux OS versions

Wed Jul 13, 2016 10:26 pm

Lenkiewicz wrote:If I want to change the operating system on my Raspberry Pi 3, how should I go about this?
Point the boot loader config files to a diffrent kernel and root filesystem .
Or just swap cards ( new boot / config + kernel and root filesystem ) ;)

#afaik :roll:

peterlite
Posts: 720
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 4:00 am

Re: Different Linux OS versions

Thu Jul 21, 2016 2:53 am

Ubuntu Mate on a Pi 3 is too slow for me. I used one of the new extra fast U3 microSD cards and Ubuntu Mate was still too slow on the Pi 3. Ubuntu Mate might perform from an SSD.

The Ubuntu Mate package installs a lot of junk you cannot uninstall without removing Mate. Ubuntu need to fix their Mate package.

At one stage I had several cards with each card testing a different OS. Raspbian with LXDE proved to be the best desktop. Raspbian Lite the best OS for remote command line access. The only problem was Raspbian Jessie's use of dhcpcd. You have to find the Jessie versions of documentation for any complex network configuration.

On the desktop, I use Linux Mint Cinnamon because Linux Mint has less problems than Ubuntu and Mate still has annoying limitations not in Cinnamon. LXDE on Raspbian has all the settings I need. LXDE on the Pi is so good that I considered replacing my desktop Cinnamon with LXDE.

Linux Mint 18 and the latest Ubuntu are based on the same Debian Jessie as Raspbian Jessie. I am updating Linux Mint to 18 for easier configuration of network interfaces.

I find switching between Cinnamon and LXDE easier than using Mate. Desktop configuration changes are similar. Mate makes some common changes difficult.

asandford
Posts: 1997
Joined: Mon Dec 31, 2012 12:54 pm
Location: Waterlooville

Re: Different Linux OS versions

Thu Jul 21, 2016 3:29 am

The whole landscape of OS options will change once pxe boot is working; it should be easy enough to pick an OS instance to use, power up the pi and off you go - no sdcards required.

peterlite
Posts: 720
Joined: Sun Apr 17, 2016 4:00 am

Re: Different Linux OS versions

Sat Jul 23, 2016 11:30 pm

PXE requires a PXE server on the network. My first Pi is the local network router/server which means it has to boot before the PXE service starts. That Pi cannot be PXE. Most of the other Pi's on my network will have to restart automatically after a power outage and will have to start immediately without waiting for the local network or a PXE server. PXE will not work for those devices.

The predecessors to PXE were in the network card BIOS. They were useful in a mainframe environment when all the data was in the mainframe. Android cloud based computing is similar. You only need to boot a network connection then boot the OS from the cloud. If you do not have a connection to the cloud, the computer is useless and there is no point in booting it.

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