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Jim Manley
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Tue Mar 19, 2013 1:52 pm

timb wrote:These things originally sold for what, $500? The only reason they're popular now is because South Coast Boutique was having a fire sale and letting these things go at $50 each. I'm sure that was at a loss.
How much do you think they would realistically charge for this if they resurrected it for the RPi? $250 minimum I bet. Who's going to pay that to stick a $35 computer in?
You're using OldeThinke from the ancient past, aka B.P., "Before Pi" ... which is any time more than just a year ago :)

I doubt anyone paid the $499.99 original retail price of the Atrix lapdocks, except perhaps the actual target customers, business people who couldn't care less what the price was since someone else was paying for it, as long as they could have the latest shiny new toy on the block before anyone else. The typical "street" price dropped to $299.99 within months, and many factory-sealed units are fetching around $100 on Amazon now that they're no longer available from the surplus clearance dumpmasters who had no idea what the actual value is.

The technology in the lapdocks is now about three years old, since it takes a year to get to volume production after the design start date for current-generation parts. Now that they're three year old parts, their cost is much lower. Even so, the quite thin and light batteries provide upwards of 4 ~ 6 hours of power. The display is better than that found on most laptops of that size (sub-12 inches), the cost of just a stand-alone HDMI monitor of that size and quality is more than $100, and will be much heavier. There's a USB hub built-in and the trackpad is not bad at all. I'll bet that anyone who does parts sourcing for a living can get everything needed to build a PiTop/LapPi for well under $100 because there's no development costs involved (modulo perhaps modding the case molds to make room for the Pi board) and the generic parts prices are as low as they're going to get. Since we know from the Pi factory videos that robot labor is cheaper, more accurate, and more productive than even Asian slave labor, the cost of assembly and testing will be minimal.

Another difference between the Atrix/Bionic lapdock and potential PiTop/LapPi markets is that there are already over a million Pii out in the wild and there haven't even been any large educational buys yet (the intended target market). If every science and math teacher were able to buy a PiTop/LapPi for each student at the actual cost of parts, assembly, and bulk shipping (the Pi economic model, in essence), that total cost could be under $100. The reason is because there would be no development, marketing, or capital costs involved, which can easily exceed 80% of the retail price of a typical consumer or business oriented product with a relatively small market size, due to risk - which describes the Atrix/Bionic lapdock market to a tee. Educational buys are paid for up-front with purchase orders (cash within days in today's banking system), with a typical required delivery period of 90 days. This is easily achievable once the POs are received and the more submitted at one time, the merrier (which describes bulk government buys to the letter).

One point of resistance to Pi acquisition, in general, is the existing Wintel/Apple-oriented IT bureaucracy that has been established over the last few decades that resulted in the UK ICT debacle (and similar results elsewhere) in large part. There would be unimaginable pressure on politicians by the current educational IT suppliers if any alternative to the status quo were pursued. Fortunately, the constituency that matters for the Pi, the science and math teachers, is pretty well fed up with the existing bureaucracy and would welcome the Pi and a PiTop/LapPi option. The way that most students get access to computers is in dedicated labs or on charging/configuration carts where everything is nailed down and under such rigid configuration management (typically due to Wintel system info security weaknesses and resetting between each session to a known state) that the possibilities for experimentation are completely scrubbed clean.

The Pi low hardware cost (It no workee any more? Have the students fix it or recycle it!) and open-source-software-on-SD-card approach, where Wintel info insecurity doesn't exist and configuration resetting is an SD card overwrite away, eliminates the need for the IT bureaucracy, which is why it will also resist Pi acquisition. The system administration being done by the students and educators would be part of the educational process instead of an adjunct bureaucratic cost. If you think corporate IT bureaucracies are immovable objects, imagine them being paid well below market rates as is the case in educational institutions. Most teachers wind up taking matters into their own hands rather than deal with the existing unresponsive IT system, anyway. That fact should just be accepted and reflected in STEM educational computing programs. Once the science and math departments have been liberated, the other departments may decide that they don't like the status quo, either.

A PiTop/LapPi would make it even easier for Pi technology to enter classrooms as they would be self-contained systems with integrated displays, keyboards, trackpads, additional USB ports, and battery power - just what's needed in a lab environment, especially in the field, where typical classroom computing devices are seldom seen. Ah, to dream, perchance to sleep (yes, I know my Shakespeare well enough that I reverse the temporal order of those two states as I get little chance to do much of either these days ):
The best things in life aren't things ... but, a Pi comes pretty darned close! :D
"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." -- W.B. Yeats
In theory, theory & practice are the same - in practice, they aren't!!!

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johnbeetem
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Tue Mar 19, 2013 6:38 pm

timb wrote:These things originally sold for what, $500? The only reason they're popular now is because South Coast Boutique was having a fire sale and letting these things go at $50 each. I'm sure that was at a loss.

How much do you think they would realistically charge for this if they resurrected it for the RPi? $250 minimum I bet. Who's going to pay that to stick a $35 computer in?
I agree with your analysis. One can quibble about how much the $250 number can be lowered, but for the present that same $250 gets you a Samsung Chromebook (1.7 GHz dual Cortex-A15) and $200 gets you an Acer Chromebook with 1.1 GHz Celeron, both with 2 GB DDR3.

The Lapdock was a rare opportunity to acquire a very nice, well-built piece of hardware that missed its market at a remaindered price. Personally, I find the fact that it doesn't have its own CPU to be a huge advantage, so I can also use it with a BeagleBoard, BeagleBone, or whatever else I want to play around with.

timb
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Tue Mar 19, 2013 7:23 pm

Jim Manley wrote: You're using OldeThinke from the ancient past, aka B.P., "Before Pi" ... which is any time more than just a year ago :)

<Snip>
Kudos to the really well thought out, insightful post. I want to disagree, but I really can't (on principle, at least). I'm sure they could lower the cost by using plastics instead of metal, having a slightly cheaper display and removing the dock component (replacing it with micro HDMI and USB micro female ports on the back). Something like that would be fantastic for not only the RPi but also other embedded systems (BeagleBoard, etc.) like you mention.

That said...
johnbeetem wrote: I agree with your analysis. One can quibble about how much the $250 number can be lowered, but for the present that same $250 gets you a Samsung Chromebook (1.7 GHz dual Cortex-A15) and $200 gets you an Acer Chromebook with 1.1 GHz Celeron, both with 2 GB DDR3.

The Lapdock was a rare opportunity to acquire a very nice, well-built piece of hardware that missed its market at a remaindered price. Personally, I find the fact that it doesn't have its own CPU to be a huge advantage, so I can also use it with a BeagleBoard, BeagleBone, or whatever else I want to play around with.
This is the reality of the situation. For EDU environments, I just don't see a RPi + Lapdock for each student being practical or cost effective. While the RPi is a great $35 computer that's basically disposable if it breaks, the Lapdock would end up being a $100-$200 piece of hardware that you're entrusting in the hands of a child.

The beauty of the RPi for educational use is the fact that you can hook it to your existing TV, keyboard and mouse and start working with basically no overhead cost. But once you start adding in the cost of a Lapdock, why not give the kids an OLPC? A Chromebook? A cheap Android tablet?

To me, the RPi is the soul of a Commodore 64 in a modern package. When I went grade school, each classroom had C64s in them. I had taught myself BASIC programming during lunches and recess through books at the library. I remember when I was about 8 years old (1992) my parents got our first computer. It was a used Packard Bell 386SX; they had just opened a business and needed something for word processing and accounting.

I spent all my free time on that thing writing games and even a few applications for my parents business (specialized calculators, inventory management, stuff like that). Anyway, long story short they ended up buying me my own system the next year at a computer show. Some no-name 486 that constantly had issues due to the cheap parts.

As a kid, if you would have given me something like the Raspberry Pi, a little box I could just plug into my TV and it was a full computer? Something small I could literally put in my pocket and take over to a friend's house? Something that was so cheap that if I broke it I could mow two lawns and buy a new one? Something like that would have been the holy grail for me as a nerdy kid.

But I digress... The bottom line I guess is that I could see someone bringing the Lapdock back in a more generic form. Just standard HDMI and USB ports on the back and a normal power button. Solely for use as (essentially) a portable KVM. Price it around $150 and I guarantee it will sell. But I just don't see some sort of educational renascence appearing around it.

After all, that's why I hardwired a HDMI cable into mine! (Funny story, I finished the Lapdock HDMI cable yesterday and my micro HDMI female to female adapter arrived today. :lol: If I would have waited a day I wouldn't have had to do all that extra work. Ah well, I think it works better hardwired anyway!)

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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Tue Mar 19, 2013 7:27 pm

johnbeetem wrote::geek:
Thanks again for all the work you did on figuring out the JHDMI connector, by the way. You have certainly helped many people get their Lapdocks going!

I actually just ordered a second unit off Amazon.com for $75 to keep as a spare. That's how useful these things are to me.

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Jim Manley
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Wed Mar 20, 2013 1:17 am

timb wrote:Kudos to the really well thought out, insightful post. I want to disagree, but I really can't (on principle, at least). I'm sure they could lower the cost by using plastics instead of metal, having a slightly cheaper display and removing the dock component (replacing it with micro HDMI and USB micro female ports on the back). Something like that would be fantastic for not only the RPi but also other embedded systems (BeagleBoard, etc.) like you mention.
Great point - there are reportedly 100,000 BeagleBoards/Bones Out There ... and who knows how many other boards that could make use of the lapdock features (IIRC, the original inspiration for our cobbled PiTops/LapPii was some kind of development board mind-melded with an Atrix lapdock).
johnbeetem wrote: I agree with your analysis. One can quibble about how much the $250 number can be lowered, but for the present that same $250 gets you a Samsung Chromebook (1.7 GHz dual Cortex-A15) and $200 gets you an Acer Chromebook with 1.1 GHz Celeron, both with 2 GB DDR3.

The Lapdock was a rare opportunity to acquire a very nice, well-built piece of hardware that missed its market at a remaindered price. Personally, I find the fact that it doesn't have its own CPU to be a huge advantage, so I can also use it with a BeagleBoard, BeagleBone, or whatever else I want to play around with.
I completely agree with you, John - this will remain an Official Brain Fart unless enough up-front money magically appears, aka pay-before-play. There is strong evidence that a good chunk of the million-plus Pii in the wild were bought by parents for their kids and even schools and teachers who have shown the ability to make good use of such adjuncts to their curricula (a lot of iPads wound up in schools early on for this very reason). Parents, enlightened STEM teachers, and hobbyists might provide the absolute minimum of tens of thousands of orders that would be needed to get this off the ground.
timb wrote:This is the reality of the situation. For EDU environments, I just don't see a RPi + Lapdock for each student being practical or cost effective. While the RPi is a great $35 computer that's basically disposable if it breaks, the Lapdock would end up being a $100-$200 piece of hardware that you're entrusting in the hands of a child.

The beauty of the RPi for educational use is the fact that you can hook it to your existing TV, keyboard and mouse and start working with basically no overhead cost. But once you start adding in the cost of a Lapdock, why not give the kids an OLPC? A Chromebook? A cheap Android tablet?
The only way a PiTop/LapPi makes any sense is below $100 and there is room to reduce features such as battery life and screen resolution to accomplish that price as long as the components are already available off-the-shelf. We're not talking about replacing the Pi - just providing a low-friction means of overcoming real issues of the availability in classrooms of HDMI/DVI-D displays, keyboards, pointing devices, USB hubs, etc., to use with Pii. Just the issue of most classroom PC displays only having VGA inputs is a significant Pi impediment (externally - many are only lacking the connector for DVI-D, as the circuitry is often inside).

The snake pit of cables that need to spew from all sides of the Pi are another significant issue anywhere but on a lab bench being truly used as such (e.g., adding GPIO wiring to external projects such as Arduinos, robotics, etc.). A PiTop/LapPi would have to provide access to the GPIO/CSI/DSI interfaces - the rest of the wiring is actually a serious detriment (it's waaaay too easy to interrupt power if the micro-USB input is used and the cable is flexed upward).

We agree on everything else ... except computing for me started literally on the ground floor ... of my parents house, as in the living room floor and my bedroom floor, where I assembled and operated my mid-1960s era Digi-Comp I three-bit plastic, metal-rod, and rubber-band computer that was programmed with bits of soda straw. Yeah, I'm really hard(ware)-core :lol:

Image
The best things in life aren't things ... but, a Pi comes pretty darned close! :D
"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." -- W.B. Yeats
In theory, theory & practice are the same - in practice, they aren't!!!

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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Wed Mar 20, 2013 2:12 am

I've got some designs sketched out for an RPi case that incorporates the micro-USB/HDMI connectors on one side (allowing you to dock the RPi in place, as intended) and then has full sized HDMI and USB connectors integrated on the top of the case that allow you to just swivel them down into the connectors on the board once it's placed in the case.

You'd also have a small power switch on the case to control the DDC/CEC ground on the Lapdock, in addition to a, say, 10 farad capacitor on the 5v USB input to keep power for the second or so after shutting the lid. For the hell of it I'd add a RTC and I2C battery fuel gauge chip from Maxim to monitor the Lapdock's battery level and charge status (and do a safe shutdown if your battery was about to die, etc.)

I've been doing some pricing and I think I could get them produced for around $50 each (assuming an initial run of 1000).

Speaking of battery life, I'm on hour 7 right now and still have 1 bar left. RPi B Rev 2 with an Edimax Wifi Adapter. I've been downloading, installing and compiling pretty much the entire time. I'd say the display was only blanked 20% of the time (and even then, the backlights still run). Maximum brightness as well. That's pretty impressive to be honest.

Speaking of that, two questions:

1) Is it possible to get the screen to actually sleep on this, instead of just black out? Right now after a few minutes of idle the display will go black, but it doesn't actually sleep (as the backlight is still on).

2) Any word on a mouse driver for this? I know the pad is multi-touch capable. Two-finger scrolling would be really nice, but I'd settle for edge scrolling if that would be possible. Three finger middle click would be great as well, but again I'd settle for some sort of hack like right+left = middle click or something.

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malakai
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Thu Mar 21, 2013 3:00 pm

Haven't purchased from here in the US coworker has bought from them though:

$50 Lapdock includes shipping

http://www.icemonkey.com/motorola-droid ... nd-charger

If anyone is still looking for a deal.
http://www.raspians.com - always looking for content feel free to ask to have it posted. Or sign up and message me to become a contributor to the site. Raspians is not affiliated with the Raspberry Pi Foundation. (RPi's + You = Raspians)


timb
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Sun Mar 24, 2013 6:36 am

Just wanted to let you guys know I have about 100 each PCB mount micro HDMI female, USB micro female, USB B female and HDMI female connectors coming from China. I've designed a small PCB to route the connections. The board will fit in place on the Lapdock and adapt it to standard female USB B and HDMI female connectors.

Once the parts get here I'll post some pictures of the first prototype.

b87lar
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2 issues w/Bionic Lapdock

Wed Mar 27, 2013 4:17 pm

With the help of this forum I am one of those who managed to set up a pi laptop (in my case using the bionic lapdock). Everything seems to work fine except the following two issues which i tried to hammer on for a while without success. Could please suggest/point me in the right direction - will be greatly appreciated:

(1) can't get the lapdock speakers to work. I verified that the Pi sends audio to the hdmi device. When connected to another hdmi monitor the sound works fine. The lapdock has two volume keys (Fn+Speaker) which do not seem to have any effect (there's no on-screen level displayed either when pressing these keys, and there's no change in sound). I am aware of an issue described by other whereby the volume changes from "no-sound" to "full-sound" only. But I can't even get that. Any ideas?

(2) have a few strange keys mappings: instead of "@" above "2" There's a double quote " and instead of "#" above "3" there's the UK symbol for pound (currency). But the key labels are @ and #. Also the key labeled "\" and "|" gives a ~tilde and #pound. I tried to choose a few different keyboard layouts but I am just fumbling. Anyone has a similar experience w/bionic lapdock, any advice will be highly appreciated!

Thanks

FlipBumWalla
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Re: 2 issues w/Bionic Lapdock

Wed Mar 27, 2013 4:34 pm

b87lar wrote:... (1) can't get the lapdock speakers to work. ... Thanks
I have the same problem. Of course, I haven't done anything about it yet. So, I'll be watching what advice folks provide here.
: )
Just a little poaching can't be a problem, right?

coolty
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Wed Mar 27, 2013 5:09 pm

So I think I may have f***ed up on my atrix lapdock. I cut the micro-USB cable from the lapdock's side. I was hoping to solder up a longer usb cable to it, but the colors are all wrong.

That, and the tiny wires. Can anyone help? I need to know what colors on the lapdock cable match up to what colors on a regular USB cable? (ex: brown to ?, tan to ?, etc)

Please help!

Thanks.

edit: pictures (don't worry, the torn up part is just the stupid shielding tape)
Image
Last edited by coolty on Wed Mar 27, 2013 5:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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LemmeFatale
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Re: 2 issues w/Bionic Lapdock

Wed Mar 27, 2013 5:27 pm

b87lar wrote:With the help of this forum I am one of those who managed to set up a pi laptop (in my case using the bionic lapdock). Everything seems to work fine except the following two issues which i tried to hammer on for a while without success. Could please suggest/point me in the right direction - will be greatly appreciated:

(1) can't get the lapdock speakers to work. I verified that the Pi sends audio to the hdmi device. When connected to another hdmi monitor the sound works fine. The lapdock has two volume keys (Fn+Speaker) which do not seem to have any effect (there's no on-screen level displayed either when pressing these keys, and there's no change in sound). I am aware of an issue described by other whereby the volume changes from "no-sound" to "full-sound" only. But I can't even get that. Any ideas?

(2) have a few strange keys mappings: instead of "@" above "2" There's a double quote " and instead of "#" above "3" there's the UK symbol for pound (currency). But the key labels are @ and #. Also the key labeled "\" and "|" gives a ~tilde and #pound. I tried to choose a few different keyboard layouts but I am just fumbling. Anyone has a similar experience w/bionic lapdock, any advice will be highly appreciated!

Thanks
FlipBumWalla wrote:
b87lar wrote:... (1) can't get the lapdock speakers to work. ... Thanks
I have the same problem. Of course, I haven't done anything about it yet. So, I'll be watching what advice folks provide here.
: )
Just a little poaching can't be a problem, right?
The sound issue is that you need to uncomment, if memory serves, "hdmi_drive=2", in config.txt, which if memory serves was mentioned earlier on in this thread. ;) This seems to be necessary regardless of what OS you're using, in my experience.

As for the keyboard issue, that's simple, too - the Raspberry Pi defaults to a UK layout, and, as with any computer, it isn't aware of what's printed on the keys. This thread should hopefully see you right, as far as sorting that out. :)

I hope this helps out a bit!
Classic - Raspberry Pi Model B (512MB) with Motorola Atrix Lapdock
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Wed Mar 27, 2013 7:29 pm

coolty wrote:So I think I may have f***ed up on my atrix lapdock. I cut the micro-USB cable from the lapdock's side. I was hoping to solder up a longer usb cable to it, but the colors are all wrong.

That, and the tiny wires. Can anyone help? I need to know what colors on the lapdock cable match up to what colors on a regular USB cable? (ex: brown to ?, tan to ?, etc)
I don't know about the colors for the USB wires, but I think I determined the correct wiring between the 30 pin "JHDMI" connector that plugs into the Atrix PC board and the Micro HDMI and Micro USB docking plugs. It's in my element14 'blog: http://www.element14.com/community/grou ... ork-around

User "timb" upstream did a full rewire using my pinout and didn't report any errors, but as always make sure the Vbus and Gnd are connected OK and that the D+ and D- aren't shorted to Vbus, Gnd, or each other.

redneck1001
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Wed Mar 27, 2013 7:30 pm

how did you config ure mause ? beucase my touch panel work very bad :/

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Re: 2 issues w/Bionic Lapdock

Wed Mar 27, 2013 7:33 pm

LemmeFatale wrote:As for the keyboard issue, that's simple, too - the Raspberry Pi defaults to a UK layout, and, as with any computer, it isn't aware of what's printed on the keys. This thread should hopefully see you right, as far as sorting that out. :)
You can also read about the keyboard issue at the RasPi Troubleshooting Wiki: http://elinux.org/R-Pi_Troubleshooting# ... an_Squeeze

timb
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Wed Mar 27, 2013 7:58 pm

coolty wrote:So I think I may have f***ed up on my atrix lapdock. I cut the micro-USB cable from the lapdock's side. I was hoping to solder up a longer usb cable to it, but the colors are all wrong.

That, and the tiny wires. Can anyone help? I need to know what colors on the lapdock cable match up to what colors on a regular USB cable? (ex: brown to ?, tan to ?, etc)

Please help!

Thanks.

edit: pictures (don't worry, the torn up part is just the stupid shielding tape)
Image
There is no standard color code for the wires on a USB cable. It will vary from one cable to the next. Look at the link john gave you and use your multimeter's continuity test function to trace the pins on the JHDMI connector that carry the USB signals to the correct wires on the harness you cut off. Next, do the same thing with the USB cable you plan to use (test continuity from the bare wires to the pins on the good end of the cable). You can find a USB pinout on the Wikipedia. You'll want to connect D+, D-, 5V and GND together.

No offense, but this is pretty basic, common sense electronics. You might think twice about cutting connectors off of things if you don't know what you're doing.

timb
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Wed Mar 27, 2013 8:21 pm

redneck1001 wrote:how did you config ure mause ? beucase my touch panel work very bad :/
Is it not working at all, or just not working well?

If it's not working at all, try double tapping the top left of the trackpad with one finger. This turns the trackpad on and off. (The white LED will be on when the mouse is enabled and off when disabled.)

b87lar
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Re: 2 issues w/Bionic Lapdock

Thu Mar 28, 2013 12:46 am

LemmeFatale wrote:
b87lar wrote: (1) can't get the lapdock speakers to work. I verified that the Pi sends audio to the hdmi device. When connected to another hdmi monitor the sound works fine. The lapdock has two volume keys (Fn+Speaker) which do not seem to have any effect (there's no on-screen level displayed either when pressing these keys, and there's no change in sound). I am aware of an issue described by other whereby the volume changes from "no-sound" to "full-sound" only. But I can't even get that. Any ideas?
The sound issue is that you need to uncomment, if memory serves, "hdmi_drive=2", in config.txt, which if memory serves was mentioned earlier on in this thread. ;) This seems to be necessary regardless of what OS you're using, in my experience.
I did that. I know for sure it is not an HDMI issue with the Raspi. When connected to a standard HDMI monitor the sound works perfectly fine. The mystery is the lapdock.
Thanks for the other hint re keyboard.

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Jim Manley
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:44 am

You may have a problem with the micro-HDMI adapter/cable connected to the lapdock that isn't used when connecting the Pi to other displays. Some HDMI peripherals have improper ground connections, or you may just have a flaky adapter/cable. If you can find someone in your area with a lapdock and working adapter/cable setup you should be able to isolate which is actually the errant component.

BTW, some Pi/display combos will pass sound without the "hdmi_drive=2" in config.txt, but it is needed for the lapdock, so just because sound works with other displays doesn't mean you don't have to make that change for the lapdock.
The best things in life aren't things ... but, a Pi comes pretty darned close! :D
"Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire." -- W.B. Yeats
In theory, theory & practice are the same - in practice, they aren't!!!

FlipBumWalla
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Thu Mar 28, 2013 1:51 am

Jim Manley wrote: ... BTW, some Pi/display combos will pass sound without the "hdmi_drive=2" in config.txt, but it is needed for the lapdock, so just because sound works with other displays doesn't mean you don't have to make that change for the lapdock.
I had not considered that. Thank you, Jim.
I made the same assumption -> I can get sound out of the TV, something must be wrong with the lapdock.

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LemmeFatale
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Thu Mar 28, 2013 3:09 pm

My apologies for not being clearer! I had thought that mentioning that I'd learned the sound tip from this thread would be adequate. :)

Did it work out for you, in the end, FlipBumWalla?
Classic - Raspberry Pi Model B (512MB) with Motorola Atrix Lapdock
Lemcon-One - Raspberry Pi Model B (256MB) PiMAME TV-Box

Raspberrypiglitch
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Mon Apr 01, 2013 6:50 am

What that stuff you use to hide the wiring and soldering
:mrgreen: :?:

timb
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Mon Apr 01, 2013 5:44 pm

Raspberrypiglitch wrote:What that stuff you use to hide the wiring and soldering
:mrgreen: :?:
Heat shrink tubing. :)

croge
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Re: I made a Raspberry PI Laptop

Wed Apr 03, 2013 12:02 am

I'm quite fascinated by the lapdock project and I've been looking at purchasing an Atrix, however I would like to try alternatives if possible.

Before I do, can anyone tell me if they have tried the RAZR Lapdock Premium (500 I think)?

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