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Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 1:48 am
by SuperMiguel

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 11:40 am
by Hove
Do you have other coding skills, or is this the first time you've tried?

Personally, I'd suggest something like "Raspberry Pi for Dummies" or "the Raspberry Pi User Guide" - they cover a lot more than just Python (so are useful for things like GPIO etc), but once you've got past the first hurdle or two with Python, then the forum and google are much better help than a book anytime.

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 12:08 pm
by ame
To learn Python try this (free) book:
http://www.diveintopython.net/

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 3:36 pm
by SuperMiguel
No it is not my first language I already know C C++ VB C# Java, etc

Also I done a lot of arduino and straight up avr programming just need a fast and good way yo learn and master Python

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 3:55 pm
by Hove
Frankly, with that many languages under your belt, especially C / C++, I'd just get on and start writing code. I found Python to be like writing C++ but with tabs to make it readable instead of braces, and without the worries of allocating / freeing memory, nor worrying (as much) about specific data types for variables.

Oh, and use www.python.org/doc are your reference - I've found it to be really useful whenever I have a problem, and if that fails me, then a google often takes me to stackoverflow.com which always seems to have a range of answers to a huge diversity of problems.

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 4:12 pm
by achrn
SuperMiguel wrote:No it is not my first language I already know C C++ VB C# Java, etc
Anyone who already has three or four languages doesn't need a book to be productive with python quickly. A skim through
http://docs.python.org/2/tutorial/ or http://docs.python.org/3/tutorial/ and then have http://docs.python.org/ on a bookmark really is all you need.

If you really want dead trees (or need it offline, or in the bath, or something), the docs site lets you download the full content as pdf.

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 6:10 pm
by stevech
learn python on a PC. Then tackle the RPi's Python.
The trick to Python coding is to have a good Python-aware editor. Perhaps Komodo's free one.

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 6:58 pm
by theoscy
If you know C / C++ You really don't need a book you will be able to pick it up quickly as it is a doddle compared to C / C++ . If you know Ruby (Not sure if you do) it is very similar to that. Just get writing Programs it will take you very little time to become comfortable with the language.

OM

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 9:46 pm
by Jednorozec
There are some pretty bad Python books out there but I would recommend anything by Mark Summerfield. The most important thing to know about Python is that everything is an object. In C a variable is a memory location where the variable is stored but in Python a variable is a reference to an object.

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 9:54 pm
by achrn
stevech wrote:learn python on a PC. Then tackle the RPi's Python.
What do you mean by 'PC' in this context? Do you mean 'on a windows operating system'. and if so, why? In so far as it is native anywhere, surely python is slightly more at home on a unix-type machine than on a windows-type machine?

If you mean 'on an X86 hardware' even more so why? I haven't found anything at all any more difficult between python on my Pi and python on my 'intel-inside' whatever-it-is (which hasn't run Windows since about 24 hours after it got to my house).

Re: Best way to learn Python and Rpi???

Posted: Sat Jan 04, 2014 10:29 pm
by Nr90
Decide what you want to create with python and just start.
The core of the language is very easy, especially if you already know those languages.

Oh and I agree with the post above me that Python is at the very least as much at home on linux as on windows