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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Thu Apr 25, 2013 8:26 pm

KeithSloan wrote:
The blurb mentions "Programmable Real-Time Unit Subsystem" Anybody got more details? I tried typing in "real time" as a search in the manual and did not get any hits. Perhaps more details will be released when they provide more information about software
Apparently the BBB has two additional integer processors for real time stuff see http://processors.wiki.ti.com/index.php ... _Subsystem

There seems to be some speculation about much TI are documenting and supporting these...
The PRUSS has two PRU cores which are TI-specific RISC processors, not ARMs. I believe everything is documented at the wiki you point to. There's extensive documentation about PRUSS in revision C of the AM335x Tech Ref Manual (SPRUH73C) but it seems to be missing from the latest revision H that's available at the TI website. This is probably an oversight. You can find other copies of revision C by searching for "SPRUH73C" on the Internet.

My understanding is that PRUSS is similar in capabilities to the hidden RISC processor in Freescale (formerly Motorola) QUICC SoCs. The huge difference is that PRUSS is open whereas you can't program QUICC yourself -- you have to use the protocols in the QUICC ROM or download binary blobs.

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 12:37 am

Average Mailman wrote:If the RPiF keeps on top of new hardware and pays attention to dropping prices on better hardware then I expect to see more and more powerful devices in the coming months. Competition = Better Products
The Foundation (why do I keep thinking of Asimov, Seldon, and The Mule every time I type that? ;) ) has stated that, other than the camera, there will be no major hardware changes for the foreseeable future (what is that, about five seconds if you're texting while driving? :( ) while they further improve the software. Some of us are hoping that a minor board rev or three will come along to address the SD card high-speed mode issue and USB sporadic burst problem sooner than later. Then again, they surprised us with a doubling of RAM last October after we surprised them with 500,000 orders by then, so who's to say what other treat they could give us in time for Halloween? Perhaps a DSI-interfaced display panel or two that a Foundation partner might stock in bulk (well, OK, how about Christmas)? Notice I didn't say which year ;)

There won't be any pressure for the Foundation to "compete" with anyone else in the intended STEM educational area, especially since educational buys have barely started in bulk. Plus, the $25 Model A meant to serve primarily that user base (note I did not say "customer base") is at an even more painful price point that a "competitor" would have to not just match, but beat by a significant margin. Then, they would have to come up with a freeware STEM courseware project that would duplicate what the Foundation and Pi educational community have been working on for over a year already, and much more, if you count the existing STEM educational efforts from the B.P. epoch (Before Pi). If someone can do all of that better than what's being done now, more power to them, but I just don't see any evidence of it.

To paraphrase the Chinese blessing/curse, "May we live in interesting times." :)
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 4:07 am

Jim Manley wrote: The Foundation (why do I keep thinking of Asimov, Seldon, and The Mule every time I type that? ;) ) ...
Yeah...but who gets to play the part of the Empire? Microsoft?
There won't be any pressure for the Foundation to "compete" with anyone else in the intended STEM educational area, especially since educational buys have barely started in bulk. Plus, the $25 Model A meant to serve primarily that user base (note I did not say "customer base") is at an even more painful price point that a "competitor" would have to not just match, but beat by a significant margin. Then, they would have to come up with a freeware STEM courseware project that would duplicate what the Foundation and Pi educational community have been working on for over a year already, and much more, if you count the existing STEM educational efforts from the B.P. epoch (Before Pi). If someone can do all of that better than what's being done now, more power to them, but I just don't see any evidence of it.
I agree that the price point of the Model A is going to be the tough part, but only if the STEM ed market goes for it. Of course, the price point of the Model B is pretty tough to beat, too.

As for the courseware... I was bemused to find that the Cubieboard people point to/recommend the use of berryboot to download and install an OS and that if you want Debian, it installs Raspbian. Since that works (I've got one sitting next to me happily running with a current uptime is just over 11.5 days...but I need to do some tests in the next few days that will require rebooting). This all makes me wonder if the courseware will run on some of the "competing" machines. (Note: As I've said before, I don't think of the Cubieboard as *competing* with the Pi so much as *complimenting* the Pi. My plans are to run two of them with small--64GB--SSDs running a replicated MySQL database that will be accessed by half a dozen Pis.)

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 9:16 am

It has to be said. The BB Black IS A BETTER DEAL THAN THE RASPBERRY PI MODEL B.

For that extra $10 you get:

- A faster CPU (before overclocking, can probably go even faster)
- Higher RAM speed than the Pi
- 2GB FLASH storage built in
and most importantly
- CABLES.

So the extra $10 is a $10 you'd spend on the Pi anyway for cables and an SD card (which becomes optional with the Bone due to its 2GB onboard).

This is just the facts here. There are also parts where the Pi wins:

- An extra USB socket
- A separate audio out
- Composite out

This is all putting community aside. I really think they are too close to compare - the Pi community and the BB community are essentially one and the same.

I have to conclude that the Bone is actually a better deal if you want a device usable as a desktop or media center, the bone is a way better option. However for small electronic projects, the Pi is perfectly fine.

Competition is a great thing, and here we have two fantastic products competing. I only hope that the Pi team arent 'done' now that the board is out. Hopefully we'll see a Model C within the next 12 months (yep, thats what it'll take to stay in the game) that has a better CPU and hopefully less of a power problem.

Sadly I dont see this happening. The Pi will eventually die out in the hobbyist area as there will be no incentive to stick around once more (powerful) boards come out at the same price point. Obviously this wont impact the foundations core goal, education, but you cant help but think it will cause an issue eventually.

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 9:32 am

rmwebs wrote:It has to be said. The BB Black IS A BETTER DEAL THAN THE RASPBERRY PI MODEL B.

For that extra $10 you get:

- A faster CPU (before overclocking, can probably go even faster)
- Higher RAM speed than the Pi
- 2GB FLASH storage built in
and most importantly
- CABLES.

So the extra $10 is a $10 you'd spend on the Pi anyway for cables and an SD card (which becomes optional with the Bone due to its 2GB onboard).

This is just the facts here. There are also parts where the Pi wins:

- An extra USB socket
- A separate audio out
- Composite out

This is all putting community aside. I really think they are too close to compare - the Pi community and the BB community are essentially one and the same.

I have to conclude that the Bone is actually a better deal if you want a device usable as a desktop or media center, the bone is a way better option. However for small electronic projects, the Pi is perfectly fine.

Competition is a great thing, and here we have two fantastic products competing. I only hope that the Pi team arent 'done' now that the board is out. Hopefully we'll see a Model C within the next 12 months (yep, thats what it'll take to stay in the game) that has a better CPU and hopefully less of a power problem.

Sadly I dont see this happening. The Pi will eventually die out in the hobbyist area as there will be no incentive to stick around once more (powerful) boards come out at the same price point. Obviously this wont impact the foundations core goal, education, but you cant help but think it will cause an issue eventually.
Does it 'Have to be said'?

One thing that people forget - the profits for the Raspi go to a charity...

Oh, and thanks for the cheery 'die out in hobbiest area' statement. Since you know sod all about the future plans for the Foundation (neither do I), I think that is a little premature, don't you? Or are you just trolling for scraps? I'm still not sure how well the BBB would compete in the media area though, which is pretty hobbiest. Still cannot figure out what it media capabilities are, or indeed whether you can plug in a camera which I think is going to be a big plus for the Raspi.

I'd also be interested to see how much the price of the Beagle goes up after launch....difficult to see how they can make it at that price, esp. since TI are a business and not a charity, but then I suppose they can use this as a loss leader (nice business, loss leading, when your competitor is a charity). Of course, that won't bother most people who just want a faster device for the minimal amount of cash.
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:11 am

and most importantly
- CABLES.
:)
Yep, its the little things that make the diff :)

TI are very good in this area - the Launchpad (PS Every geek should buy one to play with BTW) comes in lovely box with a lead and pins and a xtal and even an extra CPU so you can build your own standalone project :)

I think its great that you've got a charity setup making stuff as cheap as they can AND a chip giant selling at a loss - we are the ones winning here :)


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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:32 am

I notice the price has already gone up to £30.99.....about $50. So $15 more expensive...

Does it actually come with any cables btw? Not seeing it on the Farnell website. Not griping, just asking. uHDMI cables are generally quite expensive so would be interested to know if they are supplied.

http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/search/produc ... ku=2291620
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:35 am

It has android, which means it will also have lovefilm and netflix ;)
Android app - Raspi Card Imager - download and image SD cards - No PC required !

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:38 am

mikerr wrote:It has android, which means it will also have lovefilm and netflix ;)
But are the media capabilities good enough to display them? I'm still not sure of the specs in that department. All seems a bit vague, so any information gratefully received.
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:59 am

Not sure, but other £40 android sticks manage it fine.

Interestingly when looking for a cheap settop box to give all my TV's netflix & lovefilm, android sticks were the only real option.

Of course we were teased with a GPU accelerated android implementation nearly a year ago that may eventually get a release,
AIUI its broadcom dragging their heals on the license/release of android videocore drivers that's delaying it ?
Last edited by mikerr on Fri Apr 26, 2013 12:47 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 11:32 am

jamesh wrote:I notice the price has already gone up to £30.99.....about $50. So $15 more expensive...
You are comparing the nominal price of the Pi to the actual price of the beaglebone black. That doesn't seem very fair.

The nominal price of a Pi model B is $35, the nominal price of a beaglebone black is $45. $10 difference.

The price of a Pi from farnell (excluding VAT but including shipping) ranges from £23.42 to £26.48 to depending on quantity. the price of a beaglebone black from farnell (again excluding VAT but including shipping) is now £30.99 . £4.51 - £7.57 ($6.96-$11.68 according to google) difference.

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 12:19 pm

Took a look at the article mentioned in the first post (http://roboteurs.com/beaglebone-black-vs-raspberry-pi/) and that article is clearly unfair to the Pi.
Some people have clocked the Pi up to 1Ghz but its pretty risky.
It's NOT risky. Overclocking the CPU is not risky at all.
But then again, most PI setups are using a USB hub anyway.
No need for a USB hub if you are only using a keyboard, a mouse, and get files via the local network (and not via a HDD or SSD)
Both boards will put out 1080.
However, the official documents available for the BBB say "1280x1024 (MAX)" or "1440x900" (depending on the aspect ratio you want.)

Oh, I'd like to reflect on another comparison post, too :twisted:
rmwebs wrote:It has to be said. The BB Black IS A BETTER DEAL THAN THE RASPBERRY PI MODEL B.
ISN'T IT NICE THAT THE GOOD PEOPLE OF TI CAME UP WITH A BETTER DEAL (which they are able to provide certainly at a loss [like the Launchpad, or whatever])? Actually, it's not nice. Their main competitor is a FOUNDATION, and not a company (which can sell stuff as cheap as they would like to because they have too much profit on the other products).
rmwebs wrote:I have to conclude that the Bone is actually a better deal if you want a device usable as a desktop or media center, the bone is a way better option. However for small electronic projects, the Pi is perfectly fine.
You get it absolutely wrong. The BBB has more ports and parts used for electronic projects, and the Pi is better used for a cheap media center.
rmwebs wrote:The Pi will eventually die out in the hobbyist area as there will be no incentive to stick around once more (powerful) boards come out at the same price point.
More than a million Pi boards have been sold and there's still a huge demand. It will die out once, but not in the near future.

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 12:32 pm

jamesh wrote:I notice the price has already gone up to £30.99.....about $50. So $15 more expensive...

Does it actually come with any cables btw? Not seeing it on the Farnell website. Not griping, just asking. uHDMI cables are generally quite expensive so would be interested to know if they are supplied.

http://uk.farnell.com/jsp/search/produc ... ku=2291620
The one cable supplied according to the BBB user manual, is a USB to Mini USB B (very cheap). Since the Mini USB on the BBB is a wired as a client the cable does for power and communication between the board and a PC.
The board can be configured in several different ways, but we will discuss the two most
common scenarios as described in the Quick Start Guide card that comes in the box.


Tethered to a PC via the USB cable
o Board is accessed as a storage drive
o Or a RNDIS Ethernet connection.

Standalone desktop
o Display
o Keyboard and mouse
o External 5V power supply

Each of these configurations is discussed in general terms in the following sections.
For an up-to-date list of confirmed working accessories please go to
http://circuitco.com/support/index.php? ... ccessories
3.3

Tethered To A PC
In this configuration, the board is powered by the PC via the provided USB cable--no
other cables are required. The board is accessed either as a USB storage drive or via the
browser on the PC. You need to use either Firefox or Chrome on the PC, IEx will not
work properly. Figure 2 shows this configuration.
From Page 14 of the Manual downloadable from

http://circuitco.com/support/index.php? ... _.28A5A.29
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 12:42 pm

Yes I skimmed the manual last night, as far as I can tell the supplied cable allows you to hook it up to a PC and program it, or log into it via a browser (no precise detail of what that would look like) (and specifically not Internet Explorer, apparently).

So it probably doesn't come with full HDMI cables and all that stuff. To use it standalone raspi-style you need HDMI cable, power supply (proper 5V I think, the review posted by the OP was I think in error claiming a regulator wasn't needed) and it suggests a wireless combined keyboard/mouse set in the USB slot. I think an OS is pre-loaded into flash.

I have no info on precisely how fast the interrupts are or things like that. Actually they might be dependent on the software, after all I believe the raspi itself has hardware interrupts in the GPIO pins, I just haven't seen anyone using them on anything yet. (Like reading quadrature encoders really fast, say.)

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 2:22 pm

plugwash wrote:
jamesh wrote:I notice the price has already gone up to £30.99.....about $50. So $15 more expensive...
You are comparing the nominal price of the Pi to the actual price of the beaglebone black. That doesn't seem very fair.

The nominal price of a Pi model B is $35, the nominal price of a beaglebone black is $45. $10 difference.

The price of a Pi from farnell (excluding VAT but including shipping) ranges from £23.42 to £26.48 to depending on quantity. the price of a beaglebone black from farnell (again excluding VAT but including shipping) is now £30.99 . £4.51 - £7.57 ($6.96-$11.68 according to google) difference.
Odd, just checked the Farnell site and that 30.99 is excluding VAT and since it says postage unknown for basic shipping I assumed that would be added later, making the $50 excluding VAT and shipping. Website is obviously unclear, but I don't see anywhere saying the price includes shipping.
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 2:28 pm

For me at least it says "unknown" in the cart but when I go to the checkout page it changes to "0.00".

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 2:49 pm

My Invoice is for £33.44 total. I have a business account with them though. Delivery is 'TBC'
Don't judge Linux by the Pi.......
I must not tread on too many sacred cows......

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 3:02 pm

No business account but my invoice is also a total of £33.44

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 4:23 pm

W. H. Heydt wrote:
Jim Manley wrote: The Foundation (why do I keep thinking of Asimov, Seldon, and The Mule every time I type that? ;) ) ...
Yeah...but who gets to play the part of the Empire? Microsoft?
Empire, Schmempire ... I wanna know where the SECOND Foundation is ... "at the opposite end of the galaxy" ... think about where it was in the trilogy, the mysterious recent visit by a dashing legendary figure, the devoted acolytes ... OMG, Hal, I think WE may be the Second Foundation! Oops, I guess not any more, now that I've blown our cover :cry:
W. H. Heydt wrote:I agree that the price point of the Model A is going to be the tough part, but only if the STEM ed market goes for it. Of course, the price point of the Model B is pretty tough to beat, too.

As for the courseware... I was bemused to find that the Cubieboard people point to/recommend the use of berryboot to download and install an OS and that if you want Debian, it installs Raspbian. Since that works (I've got one sitting next to me happily running with a current uptime is just over 11.5 days...but I need to do some tests in the next few days that will require rebooting). This all makes me wonder if the courseware will run on some of the "competing" machines. (Note: As I've said before, I don't think of the Cubieboard as *competing* with the Pi so much as *complimenting* the Pi. My plans are to run two of them with small--64GB--SSDs running a replicated MySQL database that will be accessed by half a dozen Pis.)
Since the courseware is non-proprietary, the more platforms it runs on, the better - even (shudder) MS stuff which has replaced Apple systems in many schools because IT bureaucracies aren't happy until users aren't happy (it's always best to start the corporate indoctrination when they're youngest). The price-only "competition" issue is that those of us volunteers producing and using the courseware love the single target of the Pi. You and I somehow survived The Great Patriotic Unix Fragmentation Debacle that ultimately benefitted MS at a key time in history and later spurred Linus to cast The One Ring to Rule Them All. The last thing we educators need is the nerdocracy muddying the waters by spewing all sorts of spin about how many prefetches will fit on the head of a pin (analogy to the size of a microelectronic device fully intended).

Bigger/Faster/Chintzier ≠ Better, especially once you get beyond the hardware. One of the forgotten skills in computing that is long overdue for teaching new (and many not-so-new) software developers (there's a whole lot more to it than mere programming if you want to claim to be a real professional in the field) is what I call "codenomics" - how to fit ten pounds of code into a one-ounce computing space. If anyone has ever wondered why the brainiacs who work at very successful startups get paid so much more and are showered with eye-popping benefits compared with a run-of-the-mill web page designer, do a Google search on interview questions asked at highly-successful startups (including at Google) and why candidates are routinely run through a gamut of upwards of dozens of interviewers over a period of months. They're looking to weed out lazy people who demand more memory, MHz, and MB/second before they even profile their code.

The recent celebration of the anniversary of the lab at Cambridge should be a reminder of how "codenomical" the pioneers had to be in order to compute anything. Even Babbage reduced the parts count between Difference Engines One and Two by about two-thirds for identical functionality, thereby minimizing complexity, improving reliability, reducing operating power required, and shrinking time and cost to build to a third of that originally needed. DE2 could have been built in two years' less time than it took to build half of DE1, which was scrapped at that point due to running out of time and money. A corollary to Murphy's Law is that more stuff in a design or implementation means more stuff that can go wrong.
The best things in life aren't things ... but, a Pi comes pretty darned close! :D
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 4:35 pm

Jim Manley wrote:
W. H. Heydt wrote:
Jim Manley wrote: The Foundation (why do I keep thinking of Asimov, Seldon, and The Mule every time I type that? ;) ) ...
Yeah...but who gets to play the part of the Empire? Microsoft?
Empire, Schmempire ... I wanna know where the SECOND Foundation is ... "at the opposite end of the galaxy" ... think about where it was in the trilogy, the mysterious recent visit by a dashing legendary figure, the devoted acolytes ... OMG, Hal, I think WE may be the Second Foundation! Oops, I guess not any more, now that I've blown our cover :cry:
W. H. Heydt wrote:I agree that the price point of the Model A is going to be the tough part, but only if the STEM ed market goes for it. Of course, the price point of the Model B is pretty tough to beat, too.

As for the courseware... I was bemused to find that the Cubieboard people point to/recommend the use of berryboot to download and install an OS and that if you want Debian, it installs Raspbian. Since that works (I've got one sitting next to me happily running with a current uptime is just over 11.5 days...but I need to do some tests in the next few days that will require rebooting). This all makes me wonder if the courseware will run on some of the "competing" machines. (Note: As I've said before, I don't think of the Cubieboard as *competing* with the Pi so much as *complimenting* the Pi. My plans are to run two of them with small--64GB--SSDs running a replicated MySQL database that will be accessed by half a dozen Pis.)
Since the courseware is non-proprietary, the more platforms it runs on, the better - even (shudder) MS stuff which has replaced Apple systems in many schools because IT bureaucracies aren't happy until users aren't happy (it's always best to start the corporate indoctrination when they're youngest). The price-only "competition" issue is that those of us volunteers producing and using the courseware love the single target of the Pi. You and I somehow survived The Great Patriotic Unix Fragmentation Debacle that ultimately benefitted MS at a key time in history and later spurred Linus to cast The One Ring to Rule Them All. The last thing we educators need is the nerdocracy muddying the waters by spewing all sorts of spin about how many prefetches will fit on the head of a pin (analogy to the size of a microelectronic device fully intended).

Bigger/Faster/Chintzier ≠ Better, especially once you get beyond the hardware. One of the forgotten skills in computing that is long overdue for teaching new (and many not-so-new) software developers (there's a whole lot more to it than mere programming if you want to claim to be a real professional in the field) is what I call "codenomics" - how to fit ten pounds of code into a one-ounce computing space. If anyone has ever wondered why the brainiacs who work at very successful startups get paid so much more and are showered with eye-popping benefits compared with a run-of-the-mill web page designer, do a Google search on interview questions asked at highly-successful startups (including at Google) and why candidates are routinely run through a gamut of upwards of dozens of interviewers over a period of months. They're looking to weed out lazy people who demand more memory, MHz, and MB/second before they even profile their code.

The recent celebration of the anniversary of the lab at Cambridge should be a reminder of how "codenomical" the pioneers had to be in order to compute anything. Even Babbage reduced the parts count between Difference Engines One and Two by about two-thirds for identical functionality, thereby minimizing complexity, improving reliability, reducing operating power required, and shrinking time and cost to build to a third of that originally needed. DE2 could have been built in two years' less time than it took to build half of DE1, which was scrapped at that point due to running out of time and money. A corollary to Murphy's Law is that more stuff in a design or implementation means more stuff that can go wrong.
^^what Jim said^^^ - especially the part about economical problem solving and the whole thing about there being more to software development than just coding.

This is a bit of a parallel to the ummm... Parallella thread. More resources don't necessarily mean better outcomes. The one area where we've seen substantial gains in terms of geting a quart out of a pint pot in recent years is in mobile computing - and it's not about the code (in the main) but about being sympathetic to the way that humans and technology interact. We've had to be smart, because we don't have the luxury of full size screens and qwerty keyboards, neither do we have huge amounts of processing power on tap. The fact that intuitive, transparent interfaces between the user, the applications that they want to run and the hardware that they need to utilise are possible without x86-sized processor budgets should be a lesson to us all.

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 10:27 pm

gritz wrote:This is a bit of a parallel to the ummm... Parallella thread. More resources don't necessarily mean better outcomes. The one area where we've seen substantial gains in terms of geting a quart out of a pint pot in recent years is in mobile computing - and it's not about the code (in the main) but about being sympathetic to the way that humans and technology interact. We've had to be smart, because we don't have the luxury of full size screens and qwerty keyboards, neither do we have huge amounts of processing power on tap. The fact that intuitive, transparent interfaces between the user, the applications that they want to run and the hardware that they need to utilise are possible without x86-sized processor budgets should be a lesson to us all.
Hmm... let's take a quick look at Wikipedia:

The Samsung Galaxy S4 has various versions, one with a Samsung Exynos 5 Octa with four 1.6-1.8 GHz Cortex-A15 and four 1.2 GHz Cortex-A7 plus 51 GFLOPS GPU, and another with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 with four 1.9 GHz Krait cores (similar to Cortex-A15) and a GPU.

The Apple iPhone 5 has an Apple A6 SoC with (details sketchy) a two 1.3 GHz Apple Swift (similar to Cortex-A15 capabilities according to reports) and a triple-core GPU.

Looks like a lot of computing power and a lot of parallelism to me. :)

gritz
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Fri Apr 26, 2013 11:07 pm

johnbeetem wrote:
gritz wrote:This is a bit of a parallel to the ummm... Parallella thread. More resources don't necessarily mean better outcomes. The one area where we've seen substantial gains in terms of geting a quart out of a pint pot in recent years is in mobile computing - and it's not about the code (in the main) but about being sympathetic to the way that humans and technology interact. We've had to be smart, because we don't have the luxury of full size screens and qwerty keyboards, neither do we have huge amounts of processing power on tap. The fact that intuitive, transparent interfaces between the user, the applications that they want to run and the hardware that they need to utilise are possible without x86-sized processor budgets should be a lesson to us all.
Hmm... let's take a quick look at Wikipedia:

The Samsung Galaxy S4 has various versions, one with a Samsung Exynos 5 Octa with four 1.6-1.8 GHz Cortex-A15 and four 1.2 GHz Cortex-A7 plus 51 GFLOPS GPU, and another with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 with four 1.9 GHz Krait cores (similar to Cortex-A15) and a GPU.

The Apple iPhone 5 has an Apple A6 SoC with (details sketchy) a two 1.3 GHz Apple Swift (similar to Cortex-A15 capabilities according to reports) and a triple-core GPU.

Looks like a lot of computing power and a lot of parallelism to me. :)
Great! Now let's do something smarter with it than consuming pirated media!

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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Sat Apr 27, 2013 1:37 am

johnbeetem wrote:
gritz wrote:This is a bit of a parallel to the ummm... Parallella thread. More resources don't necessarily mean better outcomes. The one area where we've seen substantial gains in terms of geting a quart out of a pint pot in recent years is in mobile computing - and it's not about the code (in the main) but about being sympathetic to the way that humans and technology interact. We've had to be smart, because we don't have the luxury of full size screens and qwerty keyboards, neither do we have huge amounts of processing power on tap. The fact that intuitive, transparent interfaces between the user, the applications that they want to run and the hardware that they need to utilise are possible without x86-sized processor budgets should be a lesson to us all.
Hmm... let's take a quick look at Wikipedia:

The Samsung Galaxy S4 has various versions, one with a Samsung Exynos 5 Octa with four 1.6-1.8 GHz Cortex-A15 and four 1.2 GHz Cortex-A7 plus 51 GFLOPS GPU, and another with a Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 with four 1.9 GHz Krait cores (similar to Cortex-A15) and a GPU.

The Apple iPhone 5 has an Apple A6 SoC with (details sketchy) a two 1.3 GHz Apple Swift (similar to Cortex-A15 capabilities according to reports) and a triple-core GPU.

Looks like a lot of computing power and a lot of parallelism to me. :)
It is a lot, but being spread over lots of disparate cores makes it difficult to use in a general way (unless you stick to the main CPU's). Even a Raspi has over 24GFlops on the gpu. (which has more than 12 cores I seem to remember, 2 VPU's and a bunch of quads plus some other bits and pieces).

Given the huge compute power in these devices, they really haven't changed much in what they do over the last couple of years. There's no real 'wow' factor in any of them.
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Nige C
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Sat Apr 27, 2013 2:03 am

I cover all bases and love my 3 Raspberry Pi's, 2 dedicated and one for fun. I also have an original Beaglebone and several variations of Arduinos. They are all part of pool of learning that I hope will keep me away or delay me from dementia. I am 56 years old. I have also ordered the BeagleBone Black, it fills what for me is a fun hobby,.

Just celebrate the choice and have fun :)
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Re: Raspberry Pi vs. Beagle Bone Black

Sat Apr 27, 2013 9:16 pm

@Nige C - well said :)
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