BLL
Posts: 230
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:30 pm

Other submenu item

Sat Nov 16, 2019 3:03 pm

Hi
I have a RasPi 3B. The other day, I added a menu item to run a program of mine, by copying its desktop shortcut to /usr/share/applications.

It duly appeared under a new submenu item, called other. It was the sole entry.

Since then, I have installed various software and other now has loads of items in it, but when I go to /usr/share/applications, all the files are in their in a big heap. I would like to clean up other, but its like looking for a needle in a haystack to find and delete the required item! If I go to Preferences-> Mainmenu editor, most of the items in the other submenu do not show and I have just my item ticked. I would have expected all items showing in the other submenu to be shown in the mainmenu editor! Why aren't they?

Is there a simpler way of housekeeping one's menus?

Thanks

Brian

RossDv8
Posts: 244
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2016 12:35 pm

Re: Other submenu item

Tue Nov 19, 2019 10:36 am

I removed my post here as extraneous.
Last edited by RossDv8 on Tue Nov 19, 2019 9:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Remember, nobody is listening to you
until you fart ...

BLL
Posts: 230
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 2:30 pm

Re: Other submenu item

Tue Nov 19, 2019 5:41 pm

Hi
Thanks for the reply, but wow, it's complicated! I shall have to sit down and study it.

It still doesn't answer my questions as to why a load of entries have appeared in the "Other" menu", not at my behest and trying to find them and get rid of them is like looking for a needle in the proverbial haystack!!! Why on earth couldn't each menu items' icons be in a sub-folder of the menu's name - then it would be very easy to maintain.

Brian

RossDv8
Posts: 244
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2016 12:35 pm

Re: Other submenu item

Tue Nov 19, 2019 9:48 pm

Sorry Brian, I was concentrating on how to get the entries for your stuff 'into' the Others menu item, so you can use them on the desktop.
It looks complicated because I was tired and didn;t read the question properly. Stupid of me.
My apology. I'll kill the previous reply.

The 'Other' Menu and its friends in various Linux distros will add all sorts of executable stuff that is stored in various places on the system. Not just the stuff in Applications.

I've found it handy at times, and annoying at other times, bt=ut it is a handy catch all if looking for a program I misplaced. The problem is - it catches a lot of stuff i don;t nee and misses some stuff I installed.. So now I'm curious too.
Remember, nobody is listening to you
until you fart ...

Moonmarch
Posts: 253
Joined: Thu Mar 07, 2019 1:34 am

Re: Other submenu item

Wed Nov 20, 2019 2:05 am

In most cases I don't use the applications menu the internet browser is the blue button that is next to the pi logo this starts Chromium the file manager shortcut is next to the internet button you can guess the rest, now if you compare Windows to Raspbian most programs that you use on a Windows PC are programs that you will install now with Linux, programs can run in a directory using the ./ command which means the program does not actually need to be installed if you are compiling your own programs, the applications menu is not completely necessary the menu is available for personal preference, or if you install all of your programs from the Raspbian repository these programs will appear in the Main Menu Editor.

Instead of using the applications menu I store programs in directories that I use most often which does not require much micro managing which includes the /home/pi directory, I access folders using the terminal with commands such as dir, cd .., nano, leafpad, etc., because of using Raspbian 9 Stretch which was overall a slow operating system the terminal commands were faster than the desktop applications.

Emma_Jir
Posts: 23
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2017 11:13 am

Re: Other submenu item

Wed Nov 20, 2019 12:14 pm

Have you tried using 'grep'?
Somthing like

Code: Select all

grep Categories=Other /usr/share/applications/*.desktop
should list all desktop-files assigned to "Other".
I'm not entirely sure what exactly you are searching for but if the list above isn't too long you could work through it assigning it to the proper categories.

bjtheone
Posts: 454
Joined: Mon May 20, 2019 11:28 pm
Location: The Frozen North (AKA Canada)

Re: Other submenu item

Wed Nov 20, 2019 1:45 pm

Moonmarch wrote:
Wed Nov 20, 2019 2:05 am
In most cases I don't use the applications menu the internet browser is the blue button that is next to the pi logo this starts Chromium the file manager shortcut is next to the internet button you can guess the rest, now if you compare Windows to Raspbian most programs that you use on a Windows PC are programs that you will install now with Linux, programs can run in a directory using the ./ command which means the program does not actually need to be installed if you are compiling your own programs, the applications menu is not completely necessary the menu is available for personal preference, or if you install all of your programs from the Raspbian repository these programs will appear in the Main Menu Editor.

Instead of using the applications menu I store programs in directories that I use most often which does not require much micro managing which includes the /home/pi directory, I access folders using the terminal with commands such as dir, cd .., nano, leafpad, etc., because of using Raspbian 9 Stretch which was overall a slow operating system the terminal commands were faster than the desktop applications.
While not wrong this is rather misleading. You install programs on Linux, much the same as you install programs on Windows. The big conceptual difference is that Linux does not have a central registry (thank god) like windows, but rather tends to use a hierarchy of configuration files (a default system level and a user level so that you can override default settings) on a per application level.

If your program is small (a single script file or binary) and intended just for you the convention is to "install" it by putting it in a specific directory inside your account, and add that directory to your path. If your program is going to be used by others then you would put it up in one of the system level bin folders, that are already in their path by default. This concept gets rather blurred when you are pretending Linux is really a single user system. OS files get put in particular places, other apps get put in other places. There is a reasonably well adhered to convention on where things get put.

On top of that there is how you are actually going to run these programs. Traditionally, interactive shell scripts and small binaries get called from the command line, inside of a terminal. There are a variety of GUI methods, depending on the Desktop Manager you are running and your preferences. You could add them to the menu system, create icons on the panel, or on the desktop. A fairly common paradigm is to add the most frequently used ones as icons on the panel, for ease of access and add them to the appropriate sub menu for completeness. Most programs that you install from a repository should add the appropriate entries to the appropriate sub menus. Of course different distros have different ideas of which is the appropriate sub menu.

User avatar
rpdom
Posts: 16100
Joined: Sun May 06, 2012 5:17 am
Location: Chelmsford, Essex, UK

Re: Other submenu item

Wed Nov 20, 2019 3:15 pm

bjtheone wrote:
Wed Nov 20, 2019 1:45 pm
If your program is small (a single script file or binary) and intended just for you the convention is to "install" it by putting it in a specific directory inside your account, and add that directory to your path.
Generally for that you create a directory called "bin" in your home directory and put the executables in there. The next time you log out and in again that directory will automatically get added to your path.
bjtheone wrote:
Wed Nov 20, 2019 1:45 pm
If your program is going to be used by others then you would put it up in one of the system level bin folders, that are already in their path by default.
I'd normally add programs I had created to /usr/local/bin or /usr/local/sbin. That keeps them away from programs installed with the package manager.

Moonmarch
Posts: 253
Joined: Thu Mar 07, 2019 1:34 am

Re: Other submenu item

Wed Nov 20, 2019 11:27 pm

With Windows you install most programs using .EXE files which is comparable to .deb packages if you are installing software that is not available in the Raspbian repository people mentioning programming their own programs this is software that falls into this outside of the Raspbian repository category, .deb packages are installed using the dpkg command I admit I do not install many .deb packages no instead I compile the source code, because there are no .deb packages to download for the armhf architecture, that is how I use Linux these scenarios are not preventing me from using Linux other people can use this system that I use myself, packaging software to be installed on a computer are extra instructions for the software developers to release the software to Linux users.

I don't use a large amount of software the software that I will see in the applications menu will be overall a small number of programs, going back to the conversation about managing installed programs if you have a large number of installed programs you would still need to find the program in the applications menu or the file manager people should uninstall programs that are not utilized very often which prevents this problem from taking place or even consider changing the name of a program.

Return to “General discussion”