m123456
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:10 pm

Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Tue Dec 04, 2018 8:01 am

Hello, I am currently working on a project that will use the latest version of Pi for computer Vision. Given that the project requires high accuracy, I am currently looking for goods camera to mount onto my system. However, I was wondering what makes a camera compatible with Raspberry Pi? I'm aware that the pi uses a version of Linux as an operating system, but i am not sure if the camera being able to run on Linux is enough or if there are specific things that i should be looking for.

drgeoff
Posts: 9824
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:39 pm

Re: Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:22 am

What makes a camera "good" for you? There are many parameters including:

High sensitivity.
Low noise.
High resolution.
Low geometric distortion.
High colour accuracy.
High dynamic range.
Low shading and vignetting.
Specific focal length.
etc

jamesh
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Engineer & Forum Moderator
Posts: 23710
Joined: Sat Jul 30, 2011 7:41 pm

Re: Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Tue Dec 04, 2018 9:52 am

Most USB webcams work, but we do provide two cameras that plug in to the official camera port, the older OV5647 (5MP), and the newer IMX219 (8MP). Because they run through the inbuilt ISP, you get much better control over camera parameters.

https://www.raspberrypi.org/products/camera-module-v2/
Principal Software Engineer at Raspberry Pi (Trading) Ltd.
Contrary to popular belief, humorous signatures are allowed. Here's an example...
"My grief counseller just died, luckily, he was so good, I didn't care."

m123456
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:10 pm

Re: Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:41 pm

I apologize, this is my first time using this forum but to answer Jamesh: We want a camera that will be able track a red laser dot and pick up an offset of 0.025". We want high sensitivity using a CCV sensor, low noise, at least 13 MG, be able to detect color (red laser dot) and of focal length between 50 - 35 mm.

To both (Jamesh and drgeoff): We have been looking at industrial cameras and DSLR's since they offer more accuracy than the raspberry pi but we are not sure if they would work with raspberry pi.

User avatar
DavidS
Posts: 4334
Joined: Thu Dec 15, 2011 6:39 am
Location: USA
Contact: Website

Re: Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:58 pm

if they interface through USB 3.0 or earlier the RPi HW will not be a limit.

The question would be what is supported by the OS you chose to use on the RPi, and how much time it takes to process the retrieved data, as well as how much time it takes to do the rest of what you are doing with the RPi (which I would imagine is quite a bit more than just image processing for your project).
RPi = The best ARM based RISC OS computer around
More than 95% of posts made from RISC OS on RPi 1B/1B+ computers. Most of the rest from RISC OS on RPi 2B/3B/3B+ computers

drgeoff
Posts: 9824
Joined: Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:39 pm

Re: Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:19 pm

m123456 wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:41 pm
I apologize, this is my first time using this forum but to answer Jamesh: We want a camera that will be able track a red laser dot and pick up an offset of 0.025". We want high sensitivity using a CCV sensor, low noise, at least 13 MG, be able to detect color (red laser dot) and of focal length between 50 - 35 mm.

To both (Jamesh and drgeoff): We have been looking at industrial cameras and DSLR's since they offer more accuracy than the raspberry pi but we are not sure if they would work with raspberry pi.
Those specs mean little in themselves.

The offset needs to be in the context of the total height and width seen by the camera. Picking up an offset of 1/40 inch when imaging an area 2 inches across can be done by the cheapest of webcams. In a scene that is 200 inches across it would be "challenging".

High sensitivity and low noise both mean nothing as they are not objective measures.

CCV? Do you mean CCD? If you really need CCD as opposed to other sensor types such as MOS, then lots of cameras including the 2 RPi models can be ruled out.

13 MG? Do you mean 13 Megapixels?

How have you determined the required focal length? Usually it will be strongly linked to the size of the image sensor.
Last edited by drgeoff on Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:57 pm, edited 1 time in total.

W. H. Heydt
Posts: 10911
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 7:36 pm
Location: Vallejo, CA (US)

Re: Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Tue Dec 04, 2018 6:24 pm

drgeoff wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:19 pm
How have you determined the required focal length? Usually it will be strongly linked to the size of the image sensor.
This. The focal length should be derived from sensor size and desired field of view (in terms of angular measure, e.g. my 600mm Catadioptric lens for use with a 35mm still camera has a 4 degree field of view).

User avatar
HermannSW
Posts: 1512
Joined: Fri Jul 22, 2016 9:09 pm
Location: Eberbach, Germany
Contact: Website Twitter YouTube

Re: Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:10 am

m123456 wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:41 pm
We have been looking at industrial cameras and DSLR's since they offer more accuracy than the raspberry pi but we are not sure if they would work with raspberry pi.
If they are USB cameras they will work with Pi, but because Pi has only USB 2.0 CSI bus cameras are more performant.
There are some exotic cameras working on CSI interface.
And the old 5MP v1 camera (5$ China clone with free shipping on aliexpress) as well as the official 25$ 8MP v2 camera.

If builtin lens does not suffice, you can remove it and add an M12 mount that allows you to use any M12 lens you want.
I did that with v1 as well as v2 camera -- be careful not to get dirt on the raw camera sensor after removing builtin lens:
viewtopic.php?f=43&t=45887&p=1279957#p1279957

You can alternatively buy an 8$ v1 night vision camera from aliexpress that comes with M12 mount and M12 lens already -- that way you only have to change the lens to whatever M12 lens you want, no further work needed (I have some of those as well):
Image
⇨https://stamm-wilbrandt.de/en/Raspberry_camera.html

https://github.com/Hermann-SW/Raspberry_v1_camera_global_external_shutter
https://gitlab.freedesktop.org/HermannSW/gst-template
https://github.com/Hermann-SW/fork-raspiraw
https://twitter.com/HermannSW

m123456
Posts: 3
Joined: Sun Dec 02, 2018 11:10 pm

Re: Cameras Compatible With Raspberry Pi

Wed Dec 05, 2018 12:55 am

drgeoff wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 5:19 pm
m123456 wrote:
Tue Dec 04, 2018 4:41 pm
I apologize, this is my first time using this forum but to answer Jamesh: We want a camera that will be able track a red laser dot and pick up an offset of 0.025". We want high sensitivity using a CCV sensor, low noise, at least 13 MG, be able to detect color (red laser dot) and of focal length between 50 - 35 mm.

To both (Jamesh and drgeoff): We have been looking at industrial cameras and DSLR's since they offer more accuracy than the raspberry pi but we are not sure if they would work with raspberry pi.
Those specs mean little in themselves.

The offset needs to be in the context of the total height and width seen by the camera. Picking up an offset of 1/40 inch when imaging an area 2 inches across can be done by the cheapest of webcams. In a scene that is 200 inches across it would be "challenging".

High sensitivity and low noise both mean nothing as they are not objective measures.

CCV? Do you mean CCD? If you really need CCD as opposed to other sensor types such as MOS, then lots of cameras including the 2 RPi models can be ruled out.

13 MG? Do you mean 13 Megapixels?

How have you determined the required focal length? Usually it will be strongly linked to the size of the image sensor.
Yes, I did mean CCD and 13 Megapixels. The grid from which we would be measuring the movement of the laser dot is 10 x 10 in. We are still determining the focal length required since the camera will be have to mounted behind a grid (the camera would be about 1 - 2 ft behind). we want to be able to capture the entire grid and be able to determine the offset of the laser dot each time.

Return to “General discussion”