acarvallo
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Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 17, 2018 1:21 pm

Hello community, just like the title, my question is if it would be useful to make an Arcade with Raspberry Pi3 B, for commercial use, that is I want to make an Arcade to put in a Club and that can be put a Coin Machine in it
and obviously pay for them . I see a problem to the Start button, since it makes that the system enter menu mode, and that should not be present to the final user, but that button is the same to start a game . The device for coins
, how should I connect it ? since most of the games do not say "Insert Coin", good many thanks for your help, I hope someone can get me a response , Greetings from Argentina .. Alberto.

scotty101
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 17, 2018 2:43 pm

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mahjongg
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 17, 2018 2:55 pm

I happen to know that a great many arcade owners replace the failing electronics in retro arcade machines with PC's, and more recently with raspberry PI's, running some kind of emulator (MAME) as its often the only way of giving people the experience they want.
They often use specific USB adapter hardware to connect the coin slot switches, joysticks and buttons, to these PC's or PI's, ones such as this one: https://www.ultimarc.com/ipac1.html
Just as they have used souped up Dreamcasts to replace ailing Sega hardware in the past (and might still do so if they can still find working Dreamcasts).
is an interesting world (subculture) ....

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HawaiianPi
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 17, 2018 5:30 pm

The hardware and software issues are solvable, but as scottie101 pointed out, legality is the real problem.

You can't just use someone else's intellectual property for profit without their permission. So unless you are planning on writing your own games (and possibly your own emulator), you will have to be very careful about what you put on that machine.
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mahjongg
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Fri Sep 21, 2018 5:51 pm

HawaiianPi wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 5:30 pm
The hardware and software issues are solvable, but as scottie101 pointed out, legality is the real problem.

You can't just use someone else's intellectual property for profit without their permission. So unless you are planning on writing your own games (and possibly your own emulator), you will have to be very careful about what you put on that machine.
The legality of emulating an arcade console (but not the legality of the emulator, which is simply legal AFAIK) is a different subject altogether....... My understanding is that if you own the original, you are free to emulate it also, so my examples were about systems that the original owner owns, but is no longer working.

I think there are many places in the world where the chance you are arrested for emulating an arcade are vanishingly small... make of that what you want.... :roll:

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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Sat Sep 22, 2018 5:45 am

HawaiianPi wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 5:30 pm
You can't just use someone else's intellectual property for profit without their permission.
Making a profit is not relevant in a copyright infringement case. It may determine how much you get, but it won't affect whether or not you were infringing. More important is whether or not you are distributing the protected material to others.

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Imperf3kt
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 24, 2018 1:22 am

W. H. Heydt wrote:
Sat Sep 22, 2018 5:45 am
HawaiianPi wrote:
Mon Sep 17, 2018 5:30 pm
You can't just use someone else's intellectual property for profit without their permission.
Making a profit is not relevant in a copyright infringement case. It may determine how much you get, but it won't affect whether or not you were infringing. More important is whether or not you are distributing the protected material to others.
Emulating for personal use is one matter I stopped discussing here, but emulation for public display/use etc actually requires a commercial license, regardless of the original legality of such actions.
I cannot be bothered to cite a source, you can do that.
One example though, is on say a DVD movie, or a PC game's CD. Look for the bit about public or commercial use printed on the rim.
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Heater
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 24, 2018 4:38 am

Never mind distribution.

Surely the fact that you have copyrighted material in the first place is already an issue.

Making copies of that for your arcade machines makes the situation worse.

Then, by allowing people to come in and play that you are making a public performance of the work. See what copyright law says about that.

All in all it's a no no.

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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 24, 2018 3:47 pm

mahjongg wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 5:51 pm
The legality of emulating an arcade console (but not the legality of the emulator, which is simply legal AFAIK) is a different subject altogether....... My understanding is that if you own the original, you are free to emulate it also, so my examples were about systems that the original owner owns, but is no longer working.
There's potentially some truth in that, my only experience is within the Film/Cinema industry where licensing (and so costs) vary depending on the audience. What you buy in a shop is effectively some media and a license to use it in a home environment. It's then possible to license it separately via different organisations if it's being shown to various types of audience. The actual licensing depends on various factors related to the audience, but often you could still use the same media that was bought in a shop.

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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 24, 2018 5:54 pm

mfa298 wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 3:47 pm
mahjongg wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 5:51 pm
The legality of emulating an arcade console (but not the legality of the emulator, which is simply legal AFAIK) is a different subject altogether....... My understanding is that if you own the original, you are free to emulate it also, so my examples were about systems that the original owner owns, but is no longer working.
There's potentially some truth in that, my only experience is within the Film/Cinema industry where licensing (and so costs) vary depending on the audience. What you buy in a shop is effectively some media and a license to use it in a home environment. It's then possible to license it separately via different organisations if it's being shown to various types of audience. The actual licensing depends on various factors related to the audience, but often you could still use the same media that was bought in a shop.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Video_gam ... gal_issues

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Imperf3kt
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 24, 2018 9:42 pm

That link has nothing to do with putting a bunch of games on an arcade machine in a public place.
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Mon Sep 24, 2018 11:13 pm

mahjongg wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 5:51 pm
The legality of emulating an arcade console (but not the legality of the emulator, which is simply legal AFAIK) is a different subject altogether....... My understanding is that if you own the original, you are free to emulate it also.
That's not true in all cases, at least in the USA (not sure how much of what I have read on the subject applies internationally).

Unless something has changed recently, you are allowed to make copies of media or archival purposes (basically, backups), not for use on other devices. In fact, there is law in place that specifically prohibits that. It's called the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, or DMCA for short. While there are certain laws that allow making copies, the DMCA stipulates that you cannot circumvent any form of digital rights management (DRM) in the process of making your copy.

So, for example, you can rip a CD you own to make mp3 files to listen to on your phone, because CD media doesn't contain any mechanism to prevent that. With something like Blu-Ray or DVD, which contains encryption and other things to prevent copying or playing on unauthorized devices, the only way you can legally make a copy is to copy the physical media with all DRM intact. You cannot legally rip a DVD or Blu-Ray and make a video file that will play on your phone, your tablet, or your ultrabook computer with no optical drive.

This also applies to many games (although certainly not all of them). If the game makes any kind of hardware check (is this a genuine PlayStation console), media check (am I playing from the original game media) or client check (is Steam installed), then it may not be legal, even if it's only for your personal use.
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Tue Sep 25, 2018 12:09 am

HawaiianPi wrote:
Mon Sep 24, 2018 11:13 pm
mahjongg wrote:
Fri Sep 21, 2018 5:51 pm
The legality of emulating an arcade console (but not the legality of the emulator, which is simply legal AFAIK) is a different subject altogether....... My understanding is that if you own the original, you are free to emulate it also.
That's not true in all cases, at least in the USA (not sure how much of what I have read on the subject applies internationally).

Unless something has changed recently, you are allowed to make copies of media or archival purposes (basically, backups), not for use on other devices. In fact, there is law in place that specifically prohibits that. It's called the Digital Millennium Copyright Act, or DMCA for short. While there are certain laws that allow making copies, the DMCA stipulates that you cannot circumvent any form of digital rights management (DRM) in the process of making your copy.

So, for example, you can rip a CD you own to make mp3 files to listen to on your phone, because CD media doesn't contain any mechanism to prevent that. With something like Blu-Ray or DVD, which contains encryption and other things to prevent copying or playing on unauthorized devices, the only way you can legally make a copy is to copy the physical media with all DRM intact. You cannot legally rip a DVD or Blu-Ray and make a video file that will play on your phone, your tablet, or your ultrabook computer with no optical drive.
There is actually an exception for that called 'format shifting'

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Format_shifting
In Australia, for instance, it became legal to copy a CD and convert it to MP3 format in 2011 - many years after people had already been using mp3 players without second thought.
If you require a citation...
http://www.musicrights.com.au/fact-shee ... tshifting/

This exception however, still doesn't extend to removing DRM, so copying a DVD movie for use on a device without a DVD drive, or a PC game with copy protection, on a device it wasn't intended for, is still not permitted by law in any country.

Also of interest is 'time shifting', allowing you to record media and consume it (once) up to a week later, after which you must delete the media.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_shifting
Citation for deletion:
Under current Australian law, although it is still a breach of copyright to copy, reproduce or adapt copyright material for personal or private use without permission from the copyright owner, owners of a legitimate copy are permitted to “format shift” that work from one medium to another for personal, private use, or to “time shift” a broadcast work for later, once and only once, viewing or listening. Other technical exemptions from infringement may also apply, such as the temporary reproduction of a work in machine readable form for a computer.
From:
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Copyright
See also section 117 of the US copyright act exemptions and limitations legislation.
https://www.copyright.gov/title17/92chap1.html#117
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Tue Sep 25, 2018 10:12 pm

Yea, in the USA I believe that "format shifting" is covered somewhere in the fair use laws (could be somewhere else, it's been years since I read through all of that stuff). A year or so after DVD hit the market the DMCA was created to protect DRM controlled content.
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Imperf3kt
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Re: Raspberry as Commercial Arcade

Tue Sep 25, 2018 10:33 pm

I'm not disagreeing with you, but every time I hear or see someone mention US "fair use" laws, I cannot help but wonder if they've ever actually read them.

https://fairuse.stanford.edu/overview/f ... -fair-use/
In its most general sense, a fair use is any copying of copyrighted material done for a limited and “transformative” purpose, such as to comment upon, criticize, or parody a copyrighted work.
17 U.S.C. § 107
Notwithstanding the provisions of sections 17 U.S.C. § 106 and 17 U.S.C. § 106A, the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section, for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching (including multiple copies for classroom use), scholarship, or research, is not an infringement of copyright. In determining whether the use made of a work in any particular case is a fair use the factors to be considered shall include:[6]

the purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational purposes;
the nature of the copyrighted work;
the amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation to the copyrighted work as a whole; and
the effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.
The fact that a work is unpublished shall not itself bar a finding of fair use if such finding is made upon consideration of all the above factors.
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