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Imperf3kt
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Location: Australia

Re: Power Cable with switch

Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:39 pm

Don't know about your country, but in Australia at least, those switches are most certainly not able to be turned on/off by a mere cat walking on them or even a child playing with them. Heck, sometimes I even have trouble switching them.

Additionally, if you are still concerned, most manufacturers of power strips, include holes in the back you can slip over a screw in a wall or piece of furniture.
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n67
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Re: Power Cable with switch

Wed Sep 05, 2018 12:03 am

Imperf3kt wrote:
Tue Sep 04, 2018 11:39 pm
Don't know about your country, but in Australia at least, those switches are most certainly not able to be turned on/off by a mere cat walking on them or even a child playing with them. Heck, sometimes I even have trouble switching them.

Additionally, if you are still concerned, most manufacturers of power strips, include holes in the back you can slip over a screw in a wall or piece of furniture.
That's very interesting. Anyway, the power strips I have in my collection and which are deployed all over the estate, have very flimsy power switches, that almost look like a strong breeze might toggle them. I have no doubt my cats could do so, if they wanted to.

And, if hanging them on a wall instead of laying them out on the floor were an option, we wouldn't be having this discussion...

I'm curious, though, how is it that Australian power strips are as you say they are. Have any pictures/links? Are they like sort of part of the plastic - so you have to reach in to move them or something like that?
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Imperf3kt
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Re: Power Cable with switch

Wed Sep 05, 2018 12:49 am

Its probably the internal construction. I've disassembled many and the thing they all have in common is a heavy guage spring on the switch holding it whichever direction it was last thrown, usually with a ball of metal or very hard plastic.

It may just be the brand too, I only buy equipment manufactured by a company called 'HPM' - not out of loyalty or anything though, thats just all I see for sale.
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Burngate
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Re: Power Cable with switch

Wed Sep 05, 2018 8:27 am

n67 wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 12:03 am
Anyway, the power strips I have in my collection and which are deployed all over the estate, have very flimsy power switches, that almost look like a strong breeze might toggle them.
Which country are you in?

I don't have much direct experience of foreign mains stuff (the odd holiday cottage in France / Italy) but just looking at pictures, UK mains plugs, etc. seem rather ... over-engineered?

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davidcoton
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Re: Power Cable with switch

Wed Sep 05, 2018 8:35 am

Burngate wrote:
Wed Sep 05, 2018 8:27 am
UK mains plugs, etc. seem rather ... over-engineered?
There are standards for UK mains plugs which "enforce" a certain level of safety through the design and construction of the product.
  • Some products are designed to exceed the standards.
  • Some are designed to meet the standards at the lowest possible cost.
  • I have seen Chinese imports which do not meet UK standards and which would be dangerous to use.
Take your pick :o
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Burngate
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Re: Power Cable with switch

Wed Sep 05, 2018 9:37 am

What I'm really thinking (but it's not politic to say so) is that those foreigners don't know what they're doing.
A side-by-side comparison of various plug-types would be useful, so have a look at, for example, Image
Yes, that's only low power, but the system should be able to handle kW loads, and should safely disconnect if pulled out without first switching off
Of the four different connection blocks, the UK one seems to be the only one that is built for that - nice meaty brass pins rather than bent tin

The only downside of the UK system is that, if you trip over the cable, you fall and break your neck rather than pulling the plug out.

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