Rivalo
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2012 7:42 pm

Re: Programming the Raspberry PI.

Sun Jan 01, 2012 8:03 pm

Hello, I'm from the Netherlands so I'm sorry if you can't read my english.

One of the goals of this project, as I read from the FAQ, was to 'being used by kids all over the world to learn programming.'

I'm 15 years old so I think I fit in the target group of this Project.

Already had some basics of VB.Net and C#, so I know some stuff about programming in general, things like Integers, Strings and If/Else structures.

It's only $25 dollars, that's like €17 euro or so. I thought about many possibilities of the Raspberry. A Tablet, a Mediaplayer, but also music equipment, I think its eventually possible to make a small digital Synth or a drumcomputer.

So, are there some things I have to learn first, before purchasing the Raspberry?

If you want to succeed your goal, you need tutorials. Not boring ones, but tutorials to drag kids attention. If you gonna give a kid this chip and a big boring book 'How to learn Assembler or C' you are never going to achieve your goal.

SlayingDragons
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 3:17 am

Re: Programming the Raspberry PI.

Sun Jan 01, 2012 8:53 pm

I wouldn't say there's anything you have to learn before buying it, since the entire point of the board is to learn how to program. But if you haven't used linux before, or don't know a lot about the terminal, I would suggest getting familiar with the terminal. (You can install cygwin on windows to have a linux-like command line.) It seems daunting at first, but after using it a while it feels really natural. It might also be good to start learning a bit of languages common in linux like C and python.

And I'm not a fan of tutorials. I think there needs to be challanges. I always get bored a minute into programming tutorials and never learn a lot from them, while I very much enjoy and learn a ton from having to go and find information to beat challanges. (Like project euler or smashthestack.) I think an on-site set of programming challanges along with a general purpose programming wiki would be perfect. A couple intro tutorials would be great, but too many and it just becomes... bleh, imo. I think this may be what you mean by "not boring" tutorials though, like more hands-on projects.

And cool, more people my age on this site. ^_^

Rivalo
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jan 01, 2012 7:42 pm

Re: Programming the Raspberry PI.

Sun Jan 01, 2012 9:00 pm

I've used Ubuntu on my PC. So i have used terminal for a couple of months.

And yeah, that's what I meant by ''not boring''. Just some intro tutorials who are challenging but also result to make something awesome.

Not 'Do this, do that'-tutorials, that's too easy. People who make those tutorials could better just upload the program source, It's the same, only quicker...

User avatar
fos
Posts: 104
Joined: Wed Nov 16, 2011 1:48 am
Location: Texas & Kansas, United States
Contact: Website

Re: Programming the Raspberry PI.

Sun Jan 01, 2012 9:11 pm

SlayingDragons,

I found project euler. It looks very interesting. However, smashthestack is a war game simulation. Is that the project you suggested in your post above?
https://faroutscience.com

SlayingDragons
Posts: 67
Joined: Wed Sep 14, 2011 3:17 am

Re: Programming the Raspberry PI.

Sun Jan 01, 2012 9:20 pm

fos said:


SlayingDragons,

I found project euler. It looks very interesting. However, smashthestack is a war game simulation. Is that the project you suggested in your post above?



Eeyup. Granted, it's much more hacking than programming, but it's a great way to learn the insides of what modern computing is based on imo. And if you want to write secure programs, what better way to do it then to know what an insecure program looks like and how it could be exploited?

barnaby
Posts: 76
Joined: Fri Sep 16, 2011 6:32 pm
Contact: Website

Re: Programming the Raspberry PI.

Sun Jan 01, 2012 9:21 pm


If you want to succeed your goal, you need tutorials. Not boring ones, but tutorials to drag kids attention. If you gonna give a kid this chip and a big boring book 'How to learn Assembler or C' you are never going to achieve your goal.


Very true, and if you have a look on the educational applications board you'll find plenty of discussion about how to get kids into programming, writing good tutorials, etc.

I personally think that instead of the current system (Big, confusing documentation + mediocre, single use tutorials) we should be trying to converge towards a system where we have excellent documentation and tutorials that merely give the student ideas and directions to go in. As a 17 year old, this is what I want (and as a side project I'm trying to build the tutorial side of things).

As far as things you 'need to learn' — by the sound of it you aren't familiar with Object Oriented programming, this is something I would recommend. If you aren't familiar with MCV, look that up too.

Cheers,

Barnaby

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