adlambert

Raspberry Pi User Guide

Mon Sep 24, 2012 7:38 am

Gareth & Eben's book arrived from Amazon this morning. Surprisingly large volume, I'm very impressed with lots of detail right down to things like Wordpress on LAMP.

cutterjohn
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Re: Raspberry Pi User Guide

Tue Sep 25, 2012 2:27 pm

Mine, ordered from Amazon surprisingly arrived in this morning's mail. Original est. ship date was mid-late Oct.

At first glance looks like a good guide for novices....

Taking a further look I see how they dodged the linux distro question, just directing to the foundation's download page and then moving directly onto flashing as SD card... (I was wondering how they would do that in a way to avoid obsolescence...)

I already have a minor quibble though, large parts of OSX are in fact OSS, just not the bits(i.e. GUI especially) that make it a moderately interesting unlixlike variant excepting for the company that controls it.

Justin72
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Re: Raspberry Pi User Guide

Tue Sep 25, 2012 3:14 pm

I got mine yesterday and it has already answered a lot of questions which I had.

Fantastic book for noobs like me!

JP

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penguintutor
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Re: Raspberry Pi User Guide

Tue Sep 25, 2012 3:30 pm

I already have a minor quibble though, large parts of OSX are in fact OSS, just not the bits(i.e. GUI especially) that make it a moderately interesting unlixlike variant excepting for the company that controls it.
I haven't got the book so I'm not sure what you are referring to, but whilst parts of OS X are based on free software, the Apple modified code (including the modified code that was previously under the BSD license) is not open source.

As Linux is licensed using the GPL any modifications have to be made available for others to use - OS X is based on code under a BSD license which allows you to change the original code and keep those changes under a proprietary license.

OS X isn't open source, but it does incorporate free software - that's why there is such a big difference between "Public Domain" licenses and "Copyleft" licenses.

DFC_1883
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Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2012 11:55 pm

Re: Raspberry Pi User Guide

Wed Sep 26, 2012 12:05 am

Got mine today walked into Waterstones book shop looking for a Linux programming book and there was a copy of RPI User Guide on the shelf. Canny read so far, but got to down loading 'Thrust', question now is how to run it, thought you just typed thrust at the terminal, file not recognised. I'm using wheezy, any ideas?

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Jongoleur
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Re: Raspberry Pi User Guide

Wed Sep 26, 2012 3:56 pm

Its a frabjous day!

Got in just in time to intercept the postie on the doorstep to get:

Raspberry Pi User Guide, pre-ordered donks ago from Amazon.
A Rev 2 Raspberry Pi ordered from Element 14 on 21/9 (6 days ago!).
A clutch of 8Gb SD cards ordered from 7DayShop also ordered 6 days ago.

All I can say is that the User Guide is far superior to the thing that came with my Commodore 64. Ummm, and the Pi is far superior to that C64 ;-)

Sooooooooooooooooo...... I'm happy!
I'm just a bouncer, splatterers do it with more force.....

cutterjohn
Posts: 62
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 9:55 pm

Re: Raspberry Pi User Guide

Thu Sep 27, 2012 12:41 pm

penguintutor wrote:
I already have a minor quibble though, large parts of OSX are in fact OSS, just not the bits(i.e. GUI especially) that make it a moderately interesting unlixlike variant excepting for the company that controls it.
I haven't got the book so I'm not sure what you are referring to, but whilst parts of OS X are based on free software, the Apple modified code (including the modified code that was previously under the BSD license) is not open source.

As Linux is licensed using the GPL any modifications have to be made available for others to use - OS X is based on code under a BSD license which allows you to change the original code and keep those changes under a proprietary license.

OS X isn't open source, but it does incorporate free software - that's why there is such a big difference between "Public Domain" licenses and "Copyleft" licenses.
Did they change the licensing recently? As I seem to recall that several years ago that they had an svn repo for the BSD (and other)bits and just left the BSD license... IIRC their kernel was BSD as well, although I seem to recall that they were a slow at updating the kernel repo...

[EDIT]
BSD: Um. Wrong. Try again. BSD is actually a MORE free license than GPL is. What BSD says, more or less is that you CAN release your source changes IF you want, but if you DON'T want to you don't have to.

So wrt your above argument the *BSDs aren't OSS then eh? I suspect that will be news to their respective development groups...
[/EDIT]

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penguintutor
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Re: Raspberry Pi User Guide

Thu Sep 27, 2012 4:07 pm

Did they change the licensing recently?
Around 2006 I believe - according to MacWorld http://www.macworld.co.uk/mac/news/?newsid=14663

There is still a significant list of applications / utilities within OS X that are open source, but I believe the Kernel is now closed source and most of the GUI components have always been closed source.

Perhaps my wording was not quite right - it should have said that some elements that were open source that have been modified and the modified versions are now only available as closed source. It does still include open source elements, but it is not a free open source operating system in the same way that say Debian or the open source BSD operating systems are.
BSD: Um. Wrong. Try again. BSD is actually a MORE free license than GPL is
I didn't say BSD is any less free. If you use the GNU/FSF definition of free software then software is either free or not - there aren't different levels of free. If you tried to create a "freedom value" then you would have to weigh up the freedom of creating closed source derivatives against keeping something free.

Both public domain and copyleft meet all the aims of the GNU definition of free software and are therefore FREE. In fact the GNU definition even specifically states it doesn't need to be copyleft, although copyleft is obviously compatible with the definition as well.

BSD allows you to do what you want, but if you modify the code and don't release that modified code as free software then that modified version is not free as the BSD license doesn't require you to do so. It doesn't have a mechanism to protect the future of derivatives which is what copyleft licenses do provide.

With copyleft then you have to release the source code and can't incorporate it into proprietary code (some exceptions apply eg. if you don't make it available to the public then you can keep your updates secret).
So wrt your above argument the *BSDs aren't OSS then eh?
No I didn't say anything of the sort.

I said that if you modify BSD software and don't release that to the community then the modified version is not free. The various BSD projects do release their software as free software, they meet all the criteria of free software and are obviously open source.

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