gregeric
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Tue Dec 15, 2015 7:09 am

Top tip when using the Zero with an unknown, powered USB hub:

Always connect the hub first, NOTHING in the Zero's power-in socket. If the Zero powers up (you'll need a uSD inserted too), then stop there, you are good to go, do NOT connect power - there's no need, & you'll only have PSU's fighting each other otherwise.

macmpi
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Wed Dec 16, 2015 7:38 am

fruitoftheloom wrote:Thank you yes the AX88xx is in the Official £15.00 product AFAIAA, but to expensive
https://store.google.com/product/ethern ... chromecast
While the Instructable method uses ASIX chipset and works with Chromecast (and some Android Tablets), this does not prove the genuine Chromecast Ethernet Adapter adopts the same design.
Actually I doubt it is, since that Adapter does not work with the Android Tablets that proved working with Instructable method...
I'm interested if you have very specific clue demonstrating Chromecast Adapter does use ASIX chipset in a "classical" way.

Granted, would be nice if that adapter worked with Pi0: it's nice & clean albeit a bit expansive.
It may need to SW tricks though.
Last edited by macmpi on Wed Dec 16, 2015 2:36 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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mikerr
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Wed Dec 16, 2015 11:13 am

Is the Zero 4 layer board ? We know the other models are 6 layer...
Android app - Raspi Card Imager - download and image SD cards - No PC required !

gregeric
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Wed Dec 16, 2015 11:16 am

Plugwash says 6 layer, from the horse's mouth too:

viewtopic.php?f=63&t=129099#p862891

Muessigb
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Wed Dec 16, 2015 5:21 pm

I really like the idea of a 5$ computer, though I don't care as long as its under 18€. Well I seem to have missed the launch but I already preordered for the next batch :D. I don't care that I spent 15€ for something that is advertised as 5$, as it is still so small and useful.

One question about the pads on the underside (the ones next to the USB port - PP22 and PP23). Are they connected to D+ and D- or aren't they?

EDIT: Apparently they are. So which one is D- and which one D+?

gregeric
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Wed Dec 16, 2015 8:33 pm

Staring at the board with a naked eye it looks like D+ at PP22 & D- at PP23. User bob808 has designed an add-on board with pogo pins onto those pads over here. You'll be able to confirm the wiring from his PCB traces to a full-sized USB-A socket.

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alexeames
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Wed Dec 16, 2015 9:34 pm

Also there's a nice photo here http://hackaday.com/2015/11/28/first-ra ... back-wifi/
showing red and black wires and the corresponding USBA locations
Alex Eames RasPi.TV, RasP.iO

Muessigb
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Wed Dec 16, 2015 10:50 pm

Thank you :)

I have another question. I might, even though I really fear this, cut off the GPIO header as it won't fit into my project otherwise.
The Pi was not 5$ after all so I am more than worried that I will break it. Is there anything in the layers under or very close to the GPIO header or are the only traces in this area the ones going to the actual out-broken pins?
After all I only need USB host and HDMI and have no particular interest in the GPIO or composite at all.
The reset would be kept though.
What do you think? Can I safely dremel away the GPIO part (scoring it exactly along the bottom row of the GPIO pins?

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rurwin
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Wed Dec 16, 2015 11:44 pm

Through-holes tend to mess up routing rather but 0.1" is quite wide these days, so I'd guess it's 50:50 whether there's an odd track that weaves between the GPIO pins. If it's there it will be on an inside layer (the wide pads make it unlikely to be on the outside) so it may be that nobody will be able to tell you except the person that designed the board. It'll cost you $5 (plus tax and postage) to find out for sure.

If you do it, try to take care not to short the layers together and don't cut further than the innermost holes. There are almost certainly tracks within a fraction of a millimetre of the holes. The pads on the surface are no guide; there's four layers of tracks that you can't see.

Of course, this voids the warranty and it could do all sorts of bad stuff to anything you plugged into the Pi. The symptoms of any issue may be difficult to detect, such as quietly and slowly corrupting your SD or making certain USB peripherals flakey. Personally, I wouldn't do it.

Muessigb
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Thu Dec 17, 2015 12:05 am

rurwin wrote:Through-holes tend to mess up routing rather but 0.1" is quite wide these days, so I'd guess it's 50:50 whether there's an odd track that weaves between the GPIO pins. If it's there it will be on an inside layer (the wide pads make it unlikely to be on the outside) so it may be that nobody will be able to tell you except the person that designed the board. It'll cost you $5 (plus tax and postage) to find out for sure.

If you do it, try to take care not to short the layers together and don't cut further than the innermost holes. There are almost certainly tracks within a fraction of a millimetre of the holes. The pads on the surface are no guide; there's four layers of tracks that you can't see.

Of course, this voids the warranty and it could do all sorts of bad stuff to anything you plugged into the Pi. The symptoms of any issue may be difficult to detect, such as quietly and slowly corrupting your SD or making certain USB peripherals flakey. Personally, I wouldn't do it.
I slightly changed the parameters of my build and now don't have to cut it anymore. Though I really wonder why any important traces would be up there. The Pi Zero does not seem to have many high speed data busses except for the 4 bit parallel SDIO interface, the USB and the HDMI which are all located on the bottom / middle of the PCB and power seems to be managed in the area near the USB jacks.
But no, for me the cheapest Raspberry Pi Zero (the one I bought) was 20€ (~21.8$) including 5€ (~5.4$) shipping.
The Pi Zero is only available as a pre-order kit from a big, reputable seller here. It is claimed to be shipped starting from the 22nd december but they also say that this is only a estimate and they don't know yet.

ame
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Thu Dec 17, 2015 12:09 am

Muessigb wrote:Thank you :)

I have another question. I might, even though I really fear this, cut off the GPIO header as it won't fit into my project otherwise.
The Pi was not 5$ after all so I am more than worried that I will break it. Is there anything in the layers under or very close to the GPIO header or are the only traces in this area the ones going to the actual out-broken pins?
After all I only need USB host and HDMI and have no particular interest in the GPIO or composite at all.
The reset would be kept though.
What do you think? Can I safely dremel away the GPIO part (scoring it exactly along the bottom row of the GPIO pins?
I believe the answer is 'yes'. And I'm pretty sure someone already tried it with a Model A.

Ah, here it is:
viewtopic.php?p=753222#p753222

The Pi Zero is slightly different, so maybe you won't get lucky. Or maybe you will. It's tempting to say it's a cheap experiment, but Pi Zeros are in short supply, so if you ruin yours it might take a while to get another.

Good luck.

Muessigb
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Thu Dec 17, 2015 12:11 am

ame wrote:
Muessigb wrote:Thank you :)

I have another question. I might, even though I really fear this, cut off the GPIO header as it won't fit into my project otherwise.
The Pi was not 5$ after all so I am more than worried that I will break it. Is there anything in the layers under or very close to the GPIO header or are the only traces in this area the ones going to the actual out-broken pins?
After all I only need USB host and HDMI and have no particular interest in the GPIO or composite at all.
The reset would be kept though.
What do you think? Can I safely dremel away the GPIO part (scoring it exactly along the bottom row of the GPIO pins?
I believe the answer is 'yes'. And I'm pretty sure someone already tried it with a Model A.

Ah, here it is:
viewtopic.php?p=753222#p753222

The Pi Zero is slightly different, so maybe you won't get lucky. Or maybe you will. It's tempting to say it's a cheap experiment, but Pi Zeros are in short supply, so if you ruin yours it might take a while to get another.

Good luck.
Thanks for the link, but as I already said, for me its not a cheap experiment at all.

dom
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Thu Dec 17, 2015 11:54 am

I asked Mike:
I think the tracks are all GPIO related that are beneath the header (and there are quite a few).
The only real issue is the 5V plane. There is a relatively thin strip connecting the left hand side and the right hand side, and this is mostly underneath the GPIO header.

If people either (a) don't care about HDMI working, or (b), don't dremel much below the centre line of the second row of GPIOs, then they should be OK.

It's also possible there could be a performance hit, seeing as the power and ground planes are being eroded.

macmpi
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Mon Jan 04, 2016 7:46 pm

fruitoftheloom wrote:.....was just trying to get a definitive answer if the scenario used for the ChromeCast would work on the RPiZero :?
Yes! Just tested it.
As expected Chromecast Ethernet adapter (product code EA4CC-1E in Europe, I imagine -1A US is same) does NOT use ASIX chipset but Realtek r8152.
Fortunately this is also a very "well known" driver and it works out-of-the-box under Raspbian 1.5.0 !

May not be the cheapest way to power & ethernet a Pi-ZERO, but very convenient and lean setup if there no need for other USB peripherals: 1 tiny cable and that's all.

Have fun!

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TonyD
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Re: Meet Raspberry Pi Zero: the $5 computer

Tue Jan 05, 2016 1:30 pm

macmpi wrote:
fruitoftheloom wrote:.....was just trying to get a definitive answer if the scenario used for the ChromeCast would work on the RPiZero :?
Yes! Just tested it.
As expected Chromecast Ethernet adapter (product code EA4CC-1E in Europe, I imagine -1A US is same) does NOT use ASIX chipset but Realtek r8152.
Fortunately this is also a very "well known" driver and it works out-of-the-box under Raspbian 1.5.0 !

May not be the cheapest way to power & ethernet a Pi-ZERO, but very convenient and lean setup if there no need for other USB peripherals: 1 tiny cable and that's all.
Check out the discussion thread on "Chromecast Ethernet adapter" here:

viewtopic.php?f=63&t=131379
Tony

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