RomoBoom
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Sep 01, 2018 12:07 am

Re: What was your first computer?

Tue Oct 30, 2018 12:51 pm

mine was a pitop lol :D :D :D

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Nick_Hudson
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon May 21, 2018 10:13 am

Re: What was your first computer?

Fri Nov 09, 2018 10:15 am

My big brother had a computer with i486 intel chipset. We used to call it 486. I used to play Dave Dangerous on it :lol:

jardino
Posts: 118
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2012 9:03 am
Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Re: What was your first computer?

Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:52 am

What has your experience with it, please.
Alan.
IT Background: Honeywell H2000 ... CA Naked Mini ... Sinclair QL ... WinTel ... Linux ... Raspberry Pi.

jardino
Posts: 118
Joined: Wed Aug 08, 2012 9:03 am
Location: Aberdeenshire, Scotland

Re: What was your first computer?

Fri Nov 09, 2018 11:59 am

Sorry, my last message was unclear.
It was meant for RomoBoom and should have read,
"What has your experience with the PiTop been, please?

Alan.
IT Background: Honeywell H2000 ... CA Naked Mini ... Sinclair QL ... WinTel ... Linux ... Raspberry Pi.

mymanga003
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Nov 10, 2018 3:21 am

Re: What was your first computer?

Sat Nov 10, 2018 3:25 am

My first PC I on was a gigantic Mainframe at a Burroughs. It worked together work however the specialists had "Experience" put away in it's memory which could be played from any of the terminals. I recall as a youngster sitting alongside a monster tape peruser (enormous plate the measure of a little wheel recorded with attractive tape) playing content Adventure on a term while my father worked. My first PC at home was a "Connect" with 4 hues and a tape peruser for sparing fundamental projects you composed. Route relatively revolutionary yet never met any other individual who even knew about them. At that point got a TI 49/a sold by Bill Cosby for Kmart (mangazuki). Got an Apple 2+ and a prologue to "Apple Ciders" programming circles. Got an Apple IIe and my first infection from minimal effort programming sold by my neighborhood arrangement. Next got a XT, AT 12Mzh (these were publicized as so quick they could NEVER go out of date). A Cyrix 486DLC (as I couldn't manage the cost of an Intel 486DX). Pentiums to an AMD K6-333 (utilized this PC for a long time as it was quick enough to do numerous undertakings for quite a while) and on upward to current PCs.

Heater
Posts: 9986
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2012 3:02 pm

Re: What was your first computer?

Sun Nov 11, 2018 12:15 pm

mymanga003,
My first PC I on was a gigantic Mainframe at a Burroughs...
No it wasn't. A "PC" is generally taken to mean "Personal Computer" in this context. I'm guessing you did not personally own that gigantic mainframe and it was not there for your personal use.

Sounds like a great "first computer" experience though.

jahboater
Posts: 3030
Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2015 6:38 pm

Re: What was your first computer?

Sun Nov 11, 2018 2:27 pm

mymanga003 wrote:
Sat Nov 10, 2018 3:25 am
My first PC I on was a gigantic Mainframe at a Burroughs.
On that basis I claim a CDC 7600 super computer.
Replaced later by a Cray 1 ...

OK, it was one job per day, punched cards ....

Heater
Posts: 9986
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2012 3:02 pm

Re: What was your first computer?

Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:05 pm

On that basis I claim that I have no idea what my first PC was.

I connected via a teletype from my Technical College, using a telephone and acoustic coupler. The machine I connected too was a mainframe far away. I don't think I ever knew what it was or at least I have forgotten a long time ago.

I was using BASIC and learning assembly language with the help of a simulator so it was of no concern what the machine actually was.

Or perhaps my first PC was an Intel MDS II. It was certainly the first computer I could see and touch and have exclusive use of.

Image

I had the disc drives at the bottom so as to get a more natural view angle to the monitor.

ejolson
Posts: 2017
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 11:47 am

Re: What was your first computer?

Sun Nov 11, 2018 7:44 pm

Heater wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 5:05 pm
On that basis I claim that I have no idea what my first PC was.
Today PC generally means politically correct and nothing to do with personal.

My understanding is that the term personal computer was coined by Bob Albrecht and George Firedrake as described by the People's Computing Company which in October 1972 started with the following vision
Computers are mostly used against people rather than for people, used to control people rather than free them. Time to change all that--we need a People's Computer Company.
It is notable that this statement was made more than 10 years before Richard Stallman started the GNU project. At some point in time, IBM appropriated the term PC to refer to the 5150, which we know as the original IBM PC. Just like the Raspberry Pi Foundation was unable to trademark the Greek letter Pi, so too was IBM unable to trademark PC. Anyway, around this time PC stopped referring to a computer designed to serve an individual's personal needs and interests to a computer used by a single person in a corporate office setting.

What I find interesting is how little it matters to most people whether they are in control of their computer or whether their computer instead controls them. Given how many dogs actually take their owners for a walk when they go outside, maybe this isn't so surprising. Still, it is worth consciously reflecting on what is at stake when trading the freedom which comes from open-source and writing your own for the convenience and resulting digital feudalism which comes from using software owned and controlled by a corporation or someone else.

Having said this, from a childish point of view everything in the world is a toy. Thus, for a child to consider a mainframe owned by someone else to be their own personal computer is natural, even though a wise adult knows otherwise. This is also why keeping the price point of the Raspberry Pi cheap enough so a child can own it is an effective way to encourage learning that might otherwise disrupt the use of more expensive machines.

Heater
Posts: 9986
Joined: Tue Jul 17, 2012 3:02 pm

Re: What was your first computer?

Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:12 pm

ejolson,
Today PC generally means politically correct and nothing to do with personal.
Well, I did say one post up that ""PC" is generally taken to mean "Personal Computer" in this context". We are talking about computers right?

I don't think I had a "politically correct" as kid. Actually I still don't have one.

Anyway I disagree that PC generally means "politically correct" now a days. That went out of fashion a decade or two ago. Today it's all SJW this and CoC that. You are right though, I guess most kids today don't think personal computer when they see "PC".

Wikipedia puts "politically correct" way down the list of interpretations, under "other uses".

That's interesting about the "People's Computing Company"

ejolson
Posts: 2017
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 11:47 am

Re: What was your first computer?

Wed Nov 14, 2018 7:38 pm

Heater wrote:
Sun Nov 11, 2018 8:12 pm
That's interesting about the "People's Computing Company"
If you would like to see the vision California educators had in the 70's on how computer literacy and personal computing could transform education, back issues of The People's Computer Company are archived on the website of the Computer History Museum here.

From my point of view, the Pi has effectively recaptured the original meaning of personal computer as a computer designed to serve an individual's personal needs and interests. The GPIO and related physical computing projects make the Pi very different from an office computer used in a corporate or home setting. Thus, the Pi appeals to makers, hobbyists, children and educators in much the same way that the original 8-bit microcomputers used to. As this was the original intent, the only thing surprising is that the P in Pi stands for Python rather than personal.

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