Page 1 of 1

Programming Course for DofE Skills Activity

Posted: Tue Feb 19, 2019 9:59 pm
by DanG
Hello, I am a Duke of Edinburgh's Award (aka DofE see https://www.dofe.org/what-is-dofe) leader. Way back in 2013 when I was just starting out as a leader and Raspberry Pi’s were a relatively new thing, I ran three months’ of sessions for a group of young people to learn to program for their DofE Skills activity. We all got Raspberry Pis and I made it up as I went along teaching them Python while dissecting the code for a computer game to show them how it worked. I’ve previously had jobs as a software developer since the 1980s and I’m now a product manager for a IoT technology company, so I had the experience to do this fairly effectively.

However, I now have a new group of 14 to 15 year-olds interested in learning to program for their Skills activity and having observed that Raspberry Pi Foundation has done a tremendous job since 2013 with creating and promoting educational programmes, I’m thinking I should try leverage some of the materials/curriculum now available. I initially started looking at the Code Club stuff, but then realised it was targeted at a younger age group. There was a recommendation made to me to look at CoderDojo, but I’m wondering if this a good fit for doing once-a-week two-hour sessions for 3 months. I'll have a good chunk of time with them, so I could do a fairly comprehensive course with the young people and ideally do some more involved physical computing projects with them.

I’m about to start perusing the posts on this board for resources I can use, but I’m guessing someone already has done something similar in scope to what I’m thinking of doing and might have some good tips.

My main questions are:

1. Is there particularly suitable programme or set of materials (e.g. lesson plans) that you would be a good fit for weekly sessions over 3 months?

2. Any other advice on “not recreating the wheel” given what I’m trying to do?

Many thanks,
Dan

Re: Programming Course for DofE Skills Activity

Posted: Mon Jul 01, 2019 7:42 pm
by ShaneP
DanG wrote:
Tue Feb 19, 2019 9:59 pm
Hello, I am a Duke of Edinburgh's Award (aka DofE see https://www.dofe.org/what-is-dofe) leader. Way back in 2013 when I was just starting out as a leader and Raspberry Pi’s were a relatively new thing, I ran three months’ of sessions for a group of young people to learn to program for their DofE Skills activity. We all got Raspberry Pis and I made it up as I went along teaching them Python while dissecting the code for a computer game to show them how it worked. I’ve previously had jobs as a software developer since the 1980s and I’m now a product manager for a IoT technology company, so I had the experience to do this fairly effectively.

However, I now have a new group of 14 to 15 year-olds interested in learning to program for their Skills activity and having observed that Raspberry Pi Foundation has done a tremendous job since 2013 with creating and promoting educational programmes, I’m thinking I should try leverage some of the materials/curriculum usps tracking now available. I initially started looking at the Code Club stuff, but then realised it was targeted at a younger age group. There was a recommendation made to me to look at CoderDojo, but I’m wondering if this a good fit for doing once-a-week two-hour sessions for 3 months. I'll have a good chunk of time with them, so I could do a fairly comprehensive course with the young people and ideally do some more involved physical computing projects with them.

I’m about to start perusing the posts on this board for resources I can use, but I’m guessing someone already has done something similar in scope to what I’m thinking of doing and might have some good tips.

My main questions are:

1. Is there particularly suitable programme or set of materials (e.g. lesson plans) that you would be a good fit for weekly sessions over 3 months?

2. Any other advice on “not recreating the wheel” given what I’m trying to do?

Many thanks,
Dan
Thanks for the share. Helped me out a lot.

Thanks and Regards,
Shane