mike16
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jul 03, 2018 1:43 am

Senior Engineering Course

Tue Jul 03, 2018 1:56 am

Hi all,

I am an educator who is teaching grade 12 Computer Engineering for the first time. I just got approval to buy Raspberry Pi’s. I want to cover as many curriculum points as possible from hardware to networking to electronics. I have about 20 students and I am unsure about what kits and addons I should get as well as project ideas.

Here are my specific questions:

1) what kit would be best to start with for a senior engineering course? Is there an addon kit that would be good to start with? I live in Canada but I am allowed to order online.

2) curriculum and resource support: I would let my students have a self directed final project but I am unsure as to what I would like them to do. Are there sample projects and curriculum support (lessons + worksheets + projects) available online?

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.

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Z80 Refugee
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Re: Senior Engineering Course

Tue Jul 03, 2018 8:42 am

Military and Automotive Electronics Design Engineer (retired)

For the best service: make your thread title properly descriptive, and put all relevant details in the first post (including links - don't make us search)!

B.Goode
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Location: UK

Re: Senior Engineering Course

Tue Jul 03, 2018 8:46 am

Have you seen and absorbed the extensive content on the Education section of the Raspberry Pi Foundation website?

https://www.raspberrypi.org/education/


In particular their Digital Making Curriculum:
https://curriculum.raspberrypi.org



("Grade 12" may not be translatable for an audience outside Canada - what does that mean in terms of the age or attainment of the students?)

ejolson
Posts: 1889
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 11:47 am

Re: Senior Engineering Course

Tue Jul 03, 2018 9:51 am

mike16 wrote:
Tue Jul 03, 2018 1:56 am
I am an educator who is teaching grade 12 Computer Engineering for the first time.
Presumably this is not a new course, but is being taught by you for the first time using Raspberry Pi computers. While I teach a different computer related course (numerical methods) one thing that stands out from other courses (except perhaps music, art and physical education) is how much difference there is between students preparation: some are expert programmers while some have difficulty even typing. Some are good at typing but have trouble understanding logic. Some understand the theory but can't seem to distinguish between the letter l and the number 1 in their code.

To do any physical computing projects, it helps to have a bunch of wires, breadboards as well as passive and active electronic components. Unfortunately, it is fairly easy to burn out the Pi by shorting or incorrectly connecting the GPIO pins. I would try to get some general programming and networking done before the students start breaking things. It would be nice if there were an indestructible buffer hat that could protect the Pi from damage due to incorrectly connected GPIO wires, but I've never seen such an accessory.

One possibility is, after about a third of the way through the course, the students form as many project groups as half the number of Pi computers. At this point, each group would select one of the projects suggested in the resources above, the MagPi magazine or found online. Each project should have an associated bill of materials and budget. After all the projects are approved I would order the wires, relays, motors and other passive and active components needed for all the projects along with some spares. This would obviously work best for a year long course.

I'm not sure how to prevent carelessness that might result in damage to the Pi. Here is a policy idea: lose one letter grade on the project for breaking the Pi once and project failure for breaking two Pi computers. I'd also offer assistance to help check the wiring before applying power as well as discussing how to avoid damage from static electricity and other precautions.

B.Goode
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Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2014 4:03 pm
Location: UK

Re: Senior Engineering Course

Tue Jul 03, 2018 10:19 am

It would be nice if there were an indestructible buffer hat that could protect the Pi from damage due to incorrectly connected GPIO wires, but I've never seen such an accessory.


Probably not an indestructible panacea, but this might go some way towards your needs:
https://thepihut.com/products/raspio-pro-hat

Forris
Raspberry Pi Certified Educator
Raspberry Pi Certified Educator
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Re: Senior Engineering Course

Tue Jul 03, 2018 1:12 pm

B.Goode wrote:
Tue Jul 03, 2018 10:19 am
It would be nice if there were an indestructible buffer hat that could protect the Pi from damage due to incorrectly connected GPIO wires, but I've never seen such an accessory.


Probably not an indestructible panacea, but this might go some way towards your needs:
https://thepihut.com/products/raspio-pro-hat
That is exactly the part you need to protect your Pi. It was designed for just that purpose.

Janice357
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Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2018 11:46 am

Re: Senior Engineering Course

Mon Jul 09, 2018 6:01 am

During junior and senior years, the student will take the courses required in the chosen concentration and will have the option of taking elective courses in a minor either from another engineering field or from outside of engineering such as management, international studies or economics. The senior year of many engineering programs features a design project and thesis for the student to demonstrate the knowledge and design skills acquired through the program.

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