vrntch_pi
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Curriculum

Mon Jul 06, 2015 7:30 pm

I've volunteered to teach a Computer science class using the Rpi as a platform.
I've been in IT for 20 years (desktop/server support, Networking et, et) but teaching is another story.

I'll start with the tutorials on main site - -but feel like I need more material to occupy an entire year.

The class is High School age, (14-17 years old), I don't know their computer proficiency.
What did I get myself into?
Any suggestions?

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kusti8
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Re: Curriculum

Mon Jul 06, 2015 8:46 pm

I suggest finding something that the kids really want to ultimately do with the Pi, something that sounds fun and work through the tutorials. Then have them work on the ambitious (but not too ambitious project) and that should last the year. If not, you can always find other projects in the MagPi.

Is the class every day?
There are 10 types of people: those who understand binary and those who don't.

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B.Goode
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Re: Curriculum

Mon Jul 06, 2015 9:06 pm

If you are teaching at a stage when the pupils may be taking public examinations then maybe knowing the requirements of the National Curriculum where you are located, and the syllabus for their exam board should be early on your shopping list?

That's based on assuming that "teaching a class" is about something compulsory, not a voluntary out of school activity.

sprinkmeier
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Re: Curriculum

Mon Jul 06, 2015 9:29 pm

kusti8 wrote:I suggest finding something that the kids really want to ultimately do with the Pi
+1
I've been running similar classes, but with younger kids (http://ogpc.com.au/wiki/Category:Geekology).
Scratch has been wonderful to get the kids started though it's probably a bit young for your age-group.
Lots of python stuff out there and things like "Turtle Confusion" with nice programming challenges.
Add a bit of electronics if you can, Arduino, GPIO etc.

In the end though, assuming your situation allows for it, is to let the kids find something they're interested in and support them.

metalj
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Re: Curriculum

Mon Jul 06, 2015 11:07 pm

There are books from no starch press you can easily do a year on their material. Or you can do projects out of the magpi.
Backspace 28 times :)

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Bluebarry
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Re: Curriculum

Mon Jul 13, 2015 9:53 am

I think it's quite important to know their computer proficienty, isnt it? :lol:
Also, is it a course that is obligated for all students or do they get to choose the subject? Second case you would be lucky, because they will be more motivated to actually learn something :D

W. H. Heydt
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Re: Curriculum

Mon Jul 13, 2015 7:28 pm

Well... Unless the kids have to pick an elective course from a list and one particular course has a reputation of being particularly easy...

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Bluebarry
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Re: Curriculum

Wed Jul 15, 2015 10:15 am

True that. But if its a new course, I guess there are no ways they can know the course is gonna be easy or hard. A gamble!

vrntch_pi
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Re: Curriculum

Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:35 pm

kusti8 wrote:I suggest finding something that the kids really want to ultimately do with the Pi, something that sounds fun and work through the tutorials. Then have them work on the ambitious (but not too ambitious project) and that should last the year. If not, you can always find other projects in the MagPi.

Is the class every day?
The class is once a week for 2 hours. I did find a handbook - - this should take is through the first semester - - then 2nd semester i think we can move forward with the "Project(s)" - - thanks

vrntch_pi
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Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2015 3:06 am

Re: Curriculum

Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:38 pm

B.Goode wrote:If you are teaching at a stage when the pupils may be taking public examinations then maybe knowing the requirements of the National Curriculum where you are located, and the syllabus for their exam board should be early on your shopping list?

That's based on assuming that "teaching a class" is about something compulsory, not a voluntary out of school activity.

This is a voluntary class for homeschool students, so no examinations per se, although they will be given grades based upon attendance/participation/effort/assignment completion et et.

thanks for the reply

vrntch_pi
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Re: Curriculum

Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:39 pm

metalj wrote:There are books from no starch press you can easily do a year on their material. Or you can do projects out of the magpi.
what is 'MagPi'?

vrntch_pi
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Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2015 3:06 am

Re: Curriculum

Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:42 pm

Never Mind - - I found it (it helps to look....duh) thanks again

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B.Goode
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Location: UK

Re: Curriculum

Tue Jul 28, 2015 4:50 pm

vrntch_pi wrote:This is a voluntary class for homeschool students, so no examinations per se, although they will be given grades based upon attendance/participation/effort/assignment completion et et.
Maybe Code Club ( https://www.codeclub.org.uk/ ) in the UK, or Code Club World ( http://codeclubworld.org/ ) elsewhere, might be the source of support you need?
Our mission... is to give every child in the world the chance to learn to code by providing project materials and a volunteering framework that supports the running of after-school coding clubs.

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