Lynbarn
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:00 pm

As a governor in an infant school, I am a little envious (well in this respect at least - having been a governor in two secondary schools, I have the utmost respect for you guys!) - of those in education at Junior and Secondary levels who are looking at using the 'Pi in their teaching, but I am wondering what use there may be for the 'pi in early years education. Although they are introduced to computers (PCs) as learning resources fairly early on, and get regular exposure (we have a 10-PC computer room, plus 1 or 2 PCs in each of 6 classes of 30 pupils.)  How might the benefits of cheap devices like the 'Pi for infant school teaching and learning best be achieved?

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piglet
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:20 pm

I'm in a similar position infant and junior. I mentioned PIs (hmmm - that looks wrong....) at the latest full Governors meeting and there was considerable interest.

Someone very kindly PM'd me on the previous forum about their Governor role and ideas - but I was in the middle of the aftermath of a family death, then we had another on my wife's side...so I didn't manage to respond immediately. When the forum changed the PM's didn't transfer. I'm kicking myself! I hope they read this (if it wasn't you) and join in here.

At the moment I'm lurking and engaging in forum banter until I get a chance to buy and get my hands on one. We've seen various GPU accelerated nice things - but I'm most interested in seeing what this machine will be able to do which will be of use for this age range.

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scep
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Wed Feb 01, 2012 11:59 pm

The questions are: what age range and what do you want them to learn?

ICT is one thing - they can start learning this at any age with any old PC really. As far as Computing and computational thinkng goes, computers aren't essential (or even useful) very early on. Have you seen CS Unluugged for example? Fantastic stuff.

Lynbarn
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:20 am

Thanks for the link - very useful.  In fact, I remember as a 9-10 yo, in 1968-9, having a forward-looking class teacher, so we learned about binary and very basic computing concepts (not that any of us had actually ever seen a real computer - probably not even the teacher!), and building a simple card-based binary calculator with my Dad (don't ask me how it worked - I don't remember that much!) , to demonstrate in school as part of the lesson.

Age range?

Infants 4-7, Junior 7-10

What do you want them to learn?

Early years education involves a lot play-based learning, of which educational compuuter software can play a small but important part. At our infant school, they also use programmable turtles to develop analytic skills, and stop-motion animation cameras to make short films based on stories they produce, and many have consoles at home, so they are familiar with gaming, but less well-provided families miss out on that depth of experience. It is here that maybe the 'Pi can make a difference at home, as well as in the classroom.

The cost of supplying PCs in sufficient numbers even within school to provide a comprehensive computer-based activity opportunity for all, makes it difficult. We have recently introduced a out-of-school club for children and their parents can gain access, which benefits all of the family who may otherwise nothave access to the Internet, for exampl. Giving all pupils regular access to a (suitably protected!) 'Pi could make a lot of difference to their more productive use as they transition into Secondary education.  I don't expect to be able to turn out 7 year-old coders, but any experience they can gain at an early age will be of undoubted benefit later on, and (being a layman in terms of education) I am interested to find out what the possibilities might be.

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grumpyoldgit
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 9:07 am

I spoke the other day to my daughters, who are now in their mid twenties. While they were at secondary school, ICT seemed to consist of learning Microsoft products but when they were at primary school it was more hands-on. They reminded me about the Turtle. This was a device with wheels that could could go backwards, forwards, turn and ring a bell. It was controlled from a computer which ran LOGO. Pupils could write little programs and then watch the Turtle carry out their instructions. I'm not exactly sure what age they would have been but certainly younger than 1.

I managed to track it down on wikipedia.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L....._language)

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piglet
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 9:17 am

I've started my three-year-old...well I say that, but more truthfully my three year old kept on nagging until I set her up with an Ubunbtu login to the family computer.

She can now start it up, select Ubuntu from the boot options, find her name in the login list and click on it, enter her password and "click on the fox". Homepage is CBBC and can find her way around that site playing on the *cough* flash *cough* games using the keyboard and mouse to do so.

That's the sort of start activity for the infants. Understanding mouse and keyboard, and being able to use them in some rewarding activity.

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grumpyoldgit
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 9:22 am

Typo. My daughters are not Brainella and Intelligencia! I meant younger than 11.

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scep
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 11:50 am

piglet said:


That's the sort of start activity for the infants. Understanding mouse and keyboard, and being able to use them in some rewarding activity.


TuxPaint and GCompris keep my 3 year-old daughter quiet for ages. Guilt-free peace

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piglet
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:12 pm

scep said:


TuxPaint and GCompris keep my 3 year-old daughter quiet for ages. Guilt-free peace


Aha! GCompris – thanks. That's one to install tonight.

Do you think they'll be PI-able? *Thinks* We need a new verb. */thinks*

rpt
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 12:45 pm

scep said:


TuxPaint and GCompris keep my 3 year-old daughter quiet for ages. Guilt-free peace


That's just the sort of thing I want a Pi for, for my 5 year old daughter. And for my 2 year old to keep shouting "my turn".

bredman
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 2:56 pm

I tried GCompris for a 3-year-old and I was very disappointed.

The applications are very inconsistent with very bad user interfaces. Most of the time I had no idea what the objective was and how to proceed.

The 3-year-old lost interest very quickly.

mgmt_idiot
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 4:03 pm

I think it's worth teaching them programming as young as possible. We managed to get a 7 year-old to postulate the existence of transcendental numbers without any prompting - it certainly wasn't what we were trying to show him. He did this all on his own when trying to solve a problem with his own code.

Prometheus
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 02, 2012 7:32 pm

Grumpyoldgit said:


I spoke the other day to my daughters, who are now in their mid twenties. While they were at secondary school, ICT seemed to consist of learning Microsoft products but when they were at primary school it was more hands-on. They reminded me about the Turtle. This was a device with wheels that could could go backwards, forwards, turn and ring a bell. It was controlled from a computer which ran LOGO. Pupils could write little programs and then watch the Turtle carry out their instructions. I"m not exactly sure what age they would have been but certainly younger than 1.


Grumpyoldgit said:


Typo. My daughters are not Brainella and Intelligencia! I meant younger than 11.


If it"s of any help, when I was in infant school, we were introduced to the Turtle at about four or five years of age. The one that my school had, had a hole in it (I think in the middle) to hold a standard marker-pen, and we programmed the thing with the help of a teacher, in order to draw pictures. (The disappointing thing is that primary school education did not follow on from this!)

The other big exposure to computing that I encountered in school at that age, was Granny"s Garden on the BBC Micro. It fired the imagination, and it taught some logic and keyboard skills, as well as things like instilling the importance of reading instructions carefully before acting. (I was lucky enough to get a Commodore 64 when I was five or six years of age, too, and I"m eternally grateful to my parents for thinking ahead and giving me a great start by entrusting me with a computer of my own at that age. It let me pick up some transferrable skills that I"ve been using ever since. I can easily see others in the future saying the same thing about being lucky enough to be given a Raspberry Pi!)

Dr.Alun
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Mon Feb 06, 2012 3:14 pm

A good conundrum.

I'm a governor at my son's school (he's in touch with a couple of the teachers at my daughter's (she's 9) and have twins (3).

I teach on a foundation year Computing Science course at the University.

So I see a lot of the stuff that masquerades as ICT, and bores the poor boy rigid, what floats the boat for my daughter, and have plenty of "helping fingers" on the keyboard.

I've tried Processing (http://processing.org/) out on my daughter and leaving her with the slim book after about 10minutes I heard this "Oh Cool" and now she want's to do more.  They are both keen on getting going with the Arduino (http://www.arduino.cc/).

The PI is going to fit right in.  I've seen a lot of undergraduate students get a real buzz out of making an LED flash, and the kids  The kick of being able to hold an entire PC in your hand is going to be one of those "Oh Cool" moments for the kids (can't wait).

I see no problem with trying to do "coding" and "computer science"with these ages.  They'll get it, they are perceptive as a crowd, at 5 daughter spotted that integers form a infinite sequence and at 6 was arguing in class that infinity is not a number because it doesn't obey integer arithmetic.  The son has an amazing imagination, as do the rest of the class.  With the right tools they could produce some amazing stuff.  You should see the creativity they put into pieces of cardboard.

The trick is finding the right tools to use.  Having a Pi you can hold will grab their imaginations, if not just for the 'wow' factor.  A toolset that releases them off and away into producing stuff with it....

As for what language/toolset I'm pretty agnostic, there is no one best or perfect language.  It is the environment that makes it.  One of the things I like about the Processing/Arduino pair, is that they have an intelligent wrapper, that puts enough boiler-plate round your code to compile and run, but that it is also possible to write fully fledged Java and C programs.  The IDEs are very clean and very simple.

But then we have all of these in most Unixes already, this is a platform for everything.

With it being an 'Open Box' you can see and get at the components.  "This is the cpu that does the sums, its where your program is", "Here's the memory where its stored" etc.etc.

I already have many thinking caps on on how to use this with my kids and what advice I can give the schools on how to use it.

nmahoney
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Mon Feb 06, 2012 9:33 pm

Prometheus said:


If it"s of any help, when I was in infant school, we were introduced to the Turtle at about four or five years of age. The one that my school had, had a hole in it (I think in the middle) to hold a standard marker-pen, and we programmed the thing with the help of a teacher, in order to draw pictures. (The disappointing thing is that primary school education did not follow on from this!)



Yes, I had the same in my primary school. Sadly I didn't see Logo again until high school, where they made it part of maths lessons for a couple of weeks. Which was barely enough to learn there were things called functions and variables. I remember thinking then that I wished we'd done more with Logo in primary school when we still had the turtle with a felt-tip pen. Or I think once we put chalk in it and used it out on the playground.

I think Logo was an excellent, early introduction to programming though. I'd love to see it make a comeback in education.

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piglet
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Mon Feb 06, 2012 10:07 pm

You'd have thought that by now there would be a wide range of programmable turtle-like robots at consumer pricing. Maybe I'm just looking in the wrong places but I don't see anything...

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Burngate
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Tue Feb 07, 2012 12:17 pm

I started a thread the other day, which lead to a few 'turtles' which might be of interest

http://www.raspberrypi.org/for.....o-a-turtle

tr1ck5t3r
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Thu Feb 09, 2012 9:59 pm

Lynbarn said:


"but I am wondering what use there may be for the 'pi in early years education. Although they are introduced to computers (PCs) as learning resources fairly early on, and get regular exposure (we have a 10-PC computer room, plus 1 or 2 PCs in each of 6 classes of 30 pupils.)  How might the benefits of cheap devices like the 'Pi for infant school teaching and learning best be achieved?"


Can I just say I think the Pi has huge potential at primary school and am a little surprised its being aimed at an older audience. I was lucky enough to be introduced to a zx81 by a uni student who taught me to program some very simple hello world programs which also printed on the grey thermal paper and that was me hooked. Although they only came out in 81 which would have made me 8 we also had the pleasure of getting a BBC Basic at primary school and later on a Commodore 64 for home. We were learning to program the Basic at primary school so I think there is huge potential to use the Pi as a maths/language/programming tool at Primary school. Lets not forget computer magazines existed back then that had lots of program code in it which we could copy and save onto tape and where the program didnt work we could hack it to get it working. I was writing address book databases on the C64 within a year of getting it all self taught with the help of numerous mags and books on programming so it is possible for kids at primary school to learn these things.

Now I believe the Pi has an important role in being able to help kids with maths and some language skills albeit written computer languages but I think the educational establishment hugely under estimates the ability of the human brain at this young age to absorb things and the Pi is just the tool to make education fun again.

Has Science actually determined the maximum rate of learning of the human brain?

I'd say no but what I would say is when a kid or adult for that matter says something is hard, its not hard its just something we dont understand and thus put up a psychological barrier to justify the comment of it being hard.

In mosts cases when a kid says something is hard its becuase it hasnt been explained the best way for that kid to understand.

Now I say this becuase firstly we all have different personality types and a failure in education imo is to tailor the education thats best suited to the personality type. I'm an INTJ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/INTJ so the teaching for an INJ will need to be different for those kids (ie point them in the right direction but let them figure it out) compared to say an ESP personality type who would perhaps benefit from a rote style of teaching.

Having established what personality type they are, then the appropriate teaching method can be applied to them.

As others have touched on, the ability to hold a Pi in ones hand knowing it is so capable of many things is just whats needed to get the kids imagination fired up and for them to cherish them to some extent, much like a pet or tamagochi http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamagotchi is whilst giving them some responsibility like some kids have with mobile phones.

From the point of view of teaching them and what to teach, I would suggest a number of small projects with easy targets like writing your own calculator program or address book database for example, maybe even create your own cyber pet like a tamagotchi.

I wrote an addressbook database on the C64 within a year of getting it when they first came out and was rewriting some of the computer games we had as well. I think the key is how its sold to kids to keep them interested in it but also importantly its a great way to get parents involved with homework which we all know pays dividends as well.

What I would like to see becuase I believe it would be beneficial is things like YouTube being used inconjunction with a website where different lessons can be downloaded and taught which targets different aspects of the Pi whilst also using distance collaboration.

This way parents can get involved in homework (and parents can help each other out as well then) whilst also being able to keep an eye on their kids progress online by being able to measure for themselves how much the child has achieved however I dont know if the curriculum for the different age groups are available online, but I think it would benefit from having a much wider input than from a few select individuals who decide whats best!

Likewise I dont see any reason why older kids couldnt be grouping together competing against different classes and schools building new programs and addons to the Pi in nationwide or even countrywide competitions. Competition is a good driver and the Pi and some vivid imaginatiom could create some surprising results. I'm sure some of the big IT companies would love to get involved in helping to sponsor these comps becuase its good PR for them but they are also investing in a better calibre of employee for the future. With the internet, youtube and many opensource platforms to aid collaboration there is so much to be gained and with the main hurdle of cost pretty much overcome certainly for 1st world countries but still doing better than the 1laptop for a child scheme, there is everything to gain.

What I dont know is, is there room or flexibility in the curriculum to introduce the Pi into primary school so the basics can be taught and the imagination fired up?

If there is what would it take to organise a curriculum for primary schools nationwide who want/can participate, where the Pi can be used as a tool to aid learning maths and language skills ie the ability to learn the different languages which can be used on it as well as ICT & electronics in general.

I dont think Exam boards are useful here simply becuase different schools can pick and choose their exam boards and effectively cheat their pupils into thinking they are better at a subject becuase they chose an easy exam board like many of us have seen in the news recently where exam boards were selling exam guidance and give teachers a dam good idea of what the exact questions would be about.

Its got to be nationwide ideally a global standard but that will come in time. This way businesses can be sure that the grades a child achieves in a subject is a more accurate representation of the childs abilities no matter what part of the country (or world) they come from.

I think if we look to how some of the teaching is being conducted at higher education levels like http://www.udacity.com/ and how Stamford have been doing free courses online like https://www.ai-class.com/ this could be applied to secondary schools and even primary schools. Learn from their experiences, find out what hurdles they had to overcome, I know from being signed up to the AI course, one of the issues was getting the course material translated became a big thing which volunteers helped out with and the teaching style and accent of Sebastian (google car fame http://www.ted.com/talks/sebas.....s_car.html) was an issue for some others whilst only being a minor thing but overall enjoyed by all.

So can anyone answer the below questions?

Can a primary school curriculum incorporate some time on the Pi?

What restrictions are in place to prevent its use in the classroom apart from cost?

Is cost really a hurdle?

Could parents be expected to stump up for one?

What about kids with low/no income parents?

What areas should be focused on so that the Pi can be used as tool to aid learning in other subjects like maths?

Should the Pi be used to aid learning in other subjects?

What would be the best age group to introduce the Pi to kids?

Can it be linked in and joined up so the primary school curriculum can follow naturally into secondary school so there is no break?

What other hurdles exist which would prevent the Pi from becoming part of the curriculum?

Any other comments?

tufty
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Fri Feb 10, 2012 11:02 am

tr1ck5t3r said:


So can anyone answer the below questions?

Can a primary school curriculum incorporate some time on the Pi?


I see no reason why not.  KidsRuby or Scratch, both of which work on the Pi already, are decent starting points.  The school my brother went to used computers extensively in primary education (this was in the '80s) but was rather special, and had a very driven headmaster (building a flight simulator for the kids was one of his better achievements.  This was an actual flight simulator - it moved, albeit manually via levers actuated by the other kids, and the controls were hooked up to a BBC micro)


What restrictions are in place to prevent its use in the classroom apart from cost?


It's largely a question of indoctrination and lack of training, IMO. The imagination is there in a large number of teachers, but needs nurturing.


Is cost really a hurdle?


No. My kid's primary school just blew thousands of euros on a "digital whiteboard" just after blowing over 5 thousand on 3 laptops, all for a school which has 30 children *total*.


Could parents be expected to stump up for one?

What about kids with low/no income parents?


Could they?  Yes.  Should they?  No.  Maybe PTAs could have some effect in this.


What areas should be focused on so that the Pi can be used as tool to aid learning in other subjects like maths?


Software.  There's a lot of room for improvement there.  A lot of the work that was done in isolation in the '80s by people such as Richard Whittington at Great Gidding Primary School has been lost to time.  I doubt if there's much "off the shelf" that can be used today, you'll need to "roll your own".


Should the Pi be used to aid learning in other subjects?


Primary education is about the only place that cross-curricular delivery makes sense, IMO.  Absolutely yes.  It's a question of making the computer relevant and useful.  As an example, the flight simulator at Gidding Primary School was a "carrot" for kids to learn about navigation (geography, maths, geometry), the "Mary Rose" project they did (which hit the BBC at the time) was all about history, maths and language and tied in to current events.


What would be the best age group to introduce the Pi to kids?


Not sure.  Papert's work in LOGO was, IIRC, aimed at kids from preschool onwards.  My personal feeling would be "the sooner the better"


Can it be linked in and joined up so the primary school curriculum can follow naturally into secondary school so there is no break?


Yes.  Introducing programming in something like Scratch or LOGO at a primary level is a really good idea.


What other hurdles exist which would prevent the Pi from becoming part of the curriculum?


Microsoft.  Okay, perhaps that's a bit harsh.  Let's just say "big business' influence in the schools provisioning process.  That and short-termist thinking from the government, but that's a hurdle to everything.

Obviously, I'm not a full time teacher, nor a representative of the Foundation.

danw
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Fri Feb 10, 2012 11:14 am

Hi,

I mentioned this at a governors' meeting last night. (We are a small primary school in central Cambridge). There was a positive reaction as the head (and others) are keen to improve the school's ICT teaching.

I'm looking forward to being able to take a Pi into school and get the kids interested in what it is and hopefully get them programming on it.

From my perspective, what would be great would be some straightforward programming tutorials/guides that could be passed around a class (or computer club) to get the kids started.

There is a part of me that is wondering if the gap between programming the Pi and the games kids play on their Wiis, PS3s and XBoxs etc is going to put kids off. I was lucky enough to be in a school with ZX81s and BBC micros and also have a C64 at home. In the early days of home computing difference between what you programmed (or copied tirelessly from magazines) and could buy was not as large as it is now. ie. kids aren't going to be able to write complex 3d multiplayer games.

I'm hoping that they will just enjoy it for what it is. Plus I just watched Quake being played on it so there is scope for it as a games machine too.

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meltwater
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Fri Feb 10, 2012 11:37 am

Writing small puzzle games like you have on most smart phones is more than do able.

Also, you can task them with creating simple learning games for younger ones to use, some excellent skills in GUI design and requirement capture there!

As for the gap between the RPi and a console...I think the trick there is to interface real hardware to it such as your typical sensors and control.  Try that on your PS3!
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tr1ck5t3r
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Fri Feb 10, 2012 3:58 pm

tufty said:


Yes.  Introducing programming in something like Scratch or LOGO at a primary level is a really good idea.


Ok thanks for the feedback and the comments above confirms my suspicions.

I guess the next stage would be to see what the the primary schools have to teach like for example I know they wont be expected to learn quadratic equations, does anyone know what sort of things need to be achieved by the different age groups?

For example does an 8 year old need to know how to do multiplication & division using the number range -1000 to 1000 using one or two different methods like mental arithmetic for example. I guess what I"m try to get at is, is there anything online which states a 7 year old needs to know XYZ in maths and ABC in English for example, with an 8yr old needing to know MNO in maths and PQR in English?

I think if the expectations of what each age group needs to know can be laid out on paper first, then more people can chip in and say this can be taught using http://www.kidsruby.com using this project or that project and that can be taught using say Logo or Scratch for that project.

I dont think it would be fair to expect all learning to be done on the Pi, but mixing things up for the kids helps keep it interesting and fun in a world where there are an increasing number of distractions fighting for someones time, we as adults just need to be smarter at spotting ways to make learning fun whilst achieving better results which is investing in everyones future which is what the Pi is all about.

The kids will see a project with a finished result which gives them satisfaction and a sense of achievement to some degree but they wont neccessarily spot they are learning maths or picking up language skills along the way.

One thing I do think is important which I see often when dealing with programmers and fixing bugs in their code, is the lack of logical thought processes with problem solving and the ability to seek out the info in a structured manner whilst learning to collaborate.

Quite often I see programmers posting on forums asking how to solve a problem and pretty much expecting to be given the answer instead of being directed to look at certain areas whilst breaking things down into smaller more managable objectives; in alot of cases its lazyness which prevents them from even looking at the language help docs which more often than not gives them the answer they are looking for.

In some ways if they can be taught how to learn themselves which google & the net makes extremely easy, then their own development doesnt have to be held back by the curriculum and drip feeding of information by teachers.

Re Big business, I see more diversification taking place. Smartphones and other non-PC devices will form a greater part of our lives in the future. The common element at this stage is the internet.

More and more devices are now able to hook into the web and display pages or consume services and this isnt going to go away. Likewise the same content can be viewed & edited on more and more different devices and platforms. The net will increasingly be the the "common element" which I"m seeing myself with my own customers requirements.

10 years ago most of the business was conducted over the phone and fax machine with someone sat in front of a PC and back then they didnt envisage sending an email to their colleague sat at the desk next to them, today more of it is moving online and people working more flexible hours in different locations. BT rolling out fibre will further aid this change of lifestyle so its not impossible for more people to do whatever from the luxury of say a sun lounger on a beach somewhere in the world or on top of a mountain. So you will continue to see new companies popping up providing new global solutions which is where I expect to see some of them wanting to get in and raise their exposure with other growing trends like the Pi. Theres also alot of companies which are big names in their own right which people just dont know becuase they dont have any public exposure its just corporate. ABB the robot company is one such example:

MS"s position will continue to weaken as we see right now. Gartner announced just yesterday PC sales in the UK have dropped 19% which is NOT all down the economy but users moving onto other platforms like the ipad/iphone & android.

Likewise no one person or an organisation has a monopoly on bright ideas, the innovation can come from anyone of any age anywhere in the world. Just look at Facebook, they have come out of nowhere and this will continue to happen with other companies some of which havent even been formed yet!

Anyway I guess the next step is to try to establish what each age group needs to learn in each subject and see if there is a way of incorporating some of this in projects on the Pi.

If some projects dont already exist which could incorporate the Pi we"ll probably need to create some projects which acheive the curriculum aims. Looking at the http://www.KidsRuby.com I can see some nice projects have already been completed by others but we"ll need to see what else exists and where gaps exists fill them with input from all who can chip in.

Then I would say it would need to go online for all to see and then take it from there, ideally it would be good if everyone could be taking part right now adding their own contribution.

Online collaboration is going to be very important if its to get off the ground as its all too easy for us to do the talking and not the walking.

We"ll need to see what objections arise to using the Pi in the classroom to see if they can be overcome but equally important ask the question should they be overcome.

Just becuase we can doesnt mean we should.

So if the best teaching methods exist for some sections of learning already I dont think it would be wise to put something else in place but the key is being able to identify what is the best method in the first place. I say this becuase I saw a documentary some years ago on the teaching methods of some island kids in former colonies who were using teaching methods from the 60"s and the kids there were achieving a higher exam grade than kids in the UK who were taught with more modern teaching methods.

I"ll also throw this in as an example of what I mean:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/fem.....hools.html

"The gamekeeper"s girl aged nine, her magical century-old exercise book and a humbling lesson for today"s schools"

Once the above can be achieved other primary schools can see whats on offer and then choose to jump on board then.

Any teachers, parents or educational bods who can point us in the direction of what the kids need to learn by different age groups?

I think if we set ourselves the target of Sept 2012 for the start of the new school year, could volunteers achieve a curriculm of sorts which incorporates the Pi?

Who is up for it and who can spread the word to get parents/teachers/vested interests to have more input into this as well?

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williamhbell
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Re: Infant School 'Pi

Sun Feb 12, 2012 9:53 pm

Hi,

There are several aspects to computing education which are relevant for primary school and the early years.  The most basic step is the human-computer interaction.  This implies encouraging children to interact with computers and see what they can do.  The Raspberry PI provides an ideal platform for this, since one can completely destroy the LINUX installation and re-install it with minimal fuss.  Beyond the Raspberry PI, the Gert board provides a great way to build additional projects.  For example, one could build a simple rover with a Gert board, Raspberry PI, USB wireless adapter, battery pack etc..  Building projects with children can be very rewarding.  A soldering iron and some other components also opens up the opportunity to get into some electronics.

A three year old can learn to use a mouse to navigate.  By five, children have more concentration for simple problem solving.  Hacking in an interpreter is possible from six or so.  Hiding the workings of a computer slows down the understanding process.  For this reason, LINUX is great for all stages of education.  Let the kernel hacking begin, as soon as the first batch of production boards is available.

Regards,

Will

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scep
Posts: 1062
Joined: Sun Nov 20, 2011 8:53 am

Re: Infant School 'Pi

Sun Feb 12, 2012 10:48 pm

tr1ck5t3r said:


I guess what I"m try to get at is, is there anything online which states a 7 year old needs to know XYZ in maths and ABC in English for example, with an 8yr old needing to know MNO in maths and PQR in English?


The National Curriculum

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