ga0
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Re: For use in developing countries?

Sat Oct 22, 2011 9:56 am

I work in a developing country and am curious about Rasp=pi as a mans of providing cheap experience with computers to a new generation whose schools have no means of getting such resources. A lot of the posts on the board have been about using Rasp pi for programming, but (forgive me for my ignorance) would it also be possible to use this with a simple distro, with a few educational programs (such as Tux paint, word processors, linux educational suites)?

kme
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Re: For use in developing countries?

Sat Oct 22, 2011 10:15 am

In short: Yes.

It's a general purpose computer so you can run any "normal" Linux programs incl. word processors and such. Only limitation is that r-pi doesn't come with much RAM, so very heavy applications can be problematic.

But for your considerations it's no problem.

obarthelemy
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Re: For use in developing countries?

Sat Oct 22, 2011 11:37 am

The recommended setup in your case would probably be the default version of Linux the Pi will come with (probably Debian Linux, with the lxde Destop Manager, which is lighter than GNome or KDE). Then you can run OpenOffice (now LibreOffice), and any number of web browsers (Firefox, Chrome, or some lighter, less-well-known ones ie Midori), email programs (Thunderbird..) IM...
The slightly more expensive model B will be much more adept with OpenOffice.org thanks to its 256MB RAM, but you can probably squeeze OOo in 128MB, or, for educationnal purposes, use lighter software (I don't remember which one off the top of my head, but they do exist).

asb
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Re: For use in developing countries?

Sat Oct 22, 2011 11:46 am

I've just been playing with AbiWord and Gnumeric on my alpha board.

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jojopi
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Re: For use in developing countries?

Tue Oct 25, 2011 10:15 pm

Quote from asb on October 22, 2011, 12:46
I've just been playing with AbiWord and Gnumeric on my alpha board.

I use and recommend both of these in preference to OOo/LO, even on multi-GB desktop systems. They start up quickly and support all the functions that most people need, including importing most MS documents. Only occasionally do I need to resort to a full office suite.

Regarding developing countries, the Raspberry Pi will be about the cheapest "desktop" computer that can possibly exist when it launches. And the fact that it is focussed on programming and computer science actually makes it all the easier to use "off-label".

One question would be the local cost of (possibly used) keyboards and screens (TVs with composite input, or digital TVs/monitors). If these are hard to obtain then a low-cost "laptop" like OLPC would be more worth consideration.

subminiature
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Re: For use in developing countries?

Thu Nov 03, 2011 2:00 am

There have been low energy PCs running with 12V screens in class rooms in Africa. e.g. http://aleutia.com/case-studies/ The system does not seem to be on their current product list with the cheapest model having bags of RAM but coming in at £189.

The $35 R-Pi does not look so good when you add in Wi-fi, keyboard, mouse, screen, webcam and casing compared to a £100 Android device. There is no reason why a tablet or netbook could not be used to support and encourage programming. In terms of kit - make a computer controlled device the building block approach is it's flexibility.

I don't see that learning to program is the killer app for the R-Pi. Being part of some kit where you have sensors, cameras and robotic (as well as more general purpose computing) the low price opens up new possibilities.

raffy
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Re: For use in developing countries?

Sat Nov 05, 2011 11:54 pm

Here is a starting link to resources that use Puppy Linux for education (they contain what the original post asked for). You can try them on 256-MB RAM Pentium II PC. Burn the ISO slowly (4X) to CD and boot the PC with the CD. Puppy Linux is being developed for the RaspberryPi.

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