Ianw
Posts: 46
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:54 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sat Jan 07, 2012 10:52 am

Found it! I meant to link this forum over for the protocol/encoding info but couldnt find it!

http://homeeasyhacking.wikia.c.....acking_Wiki

It covers pretty much everything you need to know about the protocols and encoding for the Domia/home easy stuff such as grouping, addressing, signal modulation keying etc

(will have to plough ebay for some cheap domia/home easy kit!)

skifreund
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2012 6:51 pm

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sat Jan 21, 2012 7:00 pm

I think it would properly also be a solution to use one of these USB dongles to control the power sockets. It would be cheaper than an adurino plus the RF transmitter but a more than only a transmitter. In this youtube video you can see that it is possible to control the dongle with linux.

Ianw
Posts: 46
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:54 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sat Jan 21, 2012 11:14 pm

Very nice and agreed - will look into it! thanks for posting that

Ianw
Posts: 46
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:54 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sat Jan 21, 2012 11:45 pm

http://www.telldus.se/products/tellstick

Came across this one as well, also with Linux Software – will post back here on how I got on with it!

The bit I really liked was the open source SDK:

http://developer.telldus.se/doxygen/

Although the only reservation I have with this is once I buy a case, power supply, RPi, RF Dongle, Ethernet cable , power sockets, Thermostat etc – plus 300+ Hours of programming,testing and debug  price wise it puts it into commercial home automation range as a nice X10 system can be bought for a comparable price not that I am personally doing it for home automation on the cheap, however I suspect many will be drawn to the project by the allure of an uber low price solution

factors is going to be to cost of designing a complete robust system:

Pi £26

Case +/- £15

PSU +/- £10

RF Dongle +/- £30

4 home easy power Sockets +/- £30

Thermostat controller +/- 40

Temp Sensor+board &Wiring +/- £10

Cat 5 £5

So not that bad overall price wise compared to a similar system

Looks like the next challenge is to find a way to reduce the costs or find a well supported inexpensive RF interface/make one

My present arduino system cost approx:

Micro ITX case inc psu £30

Arduino+Ethernet shield £35

20 Mtrs Cat5 £5 (Links to Solid State Relay on thermostat)

9 Status plug sockets £15

433 Mhz RF Module £12

2 Line LCD Display £6

Protoboard + Misc components,fuses, board mounts, panel connectors etc £30

Thermostat £40

Temp Sensor+wiring £10

Car use+fuel £40

CNC cutting + plate for the case back panel for the connectors £15

DynDns Address £15 a year (+ new router as BT Homehub didnt like external port forwarding)

About 200 Hours of tinkering/testing/programming modding

Total £250+

Plus didnt have to be too user friendly as I made it myself and know the systems quirks!

The Pi Project would have to be supportable, user friendly, robust and safe so would need a good thrashing before it was fully let loose plus lots of time documenting it all

This is going to be a good challenge, if not least finding the best way to do it all!

+ theres no profit in it as it will be 100% open source so anyone interested in supporting/developing it had better like doing things for the greater good lol

bradburts
Posts: 341
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:07 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sun Jan 22, 2012 10:45 am

Some good links.

Think your Pi case/psu costs are a little inflated.

Whats the £40 thermostat controller for?

I will be doing something similar, once we have a PI be good to share notes.

Ianw
Posts: 46
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:54 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sun Jan 22, 2012 11:10 am

Hi Brad,

The £40 thermostat was to replace the current working Boiler thermostat – I wanted a spare incase I bodged the working one lol

+ the budget forecast for the Pi was a bit pessimistic, but going off the price of cases for other MCU"s £15 seems to be the magic number lol+Based on Maplin's idea of what things cost (not that I would personally touch them with a bargepole, waaaay too pricey for components IMO!)

Cheers

Ian

Ianw
Posts: 46
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:54 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Tue Mar 06, 2012 7:00 pm

Quick update, I did some experimentation with the Virtual PI OS and can now control IR and RF Devices. As soon as the Physical PI arrives will test and post results up here then in theres enough interest will open up a dev site. Also eliminated the need for an SSR for the heating by soldering onto the boiler controllers on/off button and using an opto isolator to simulate the button press and the controllers LED 1.5v power to detect on/off state again by using an opto-isolator and an MCU

Cheers

Ian

PaulTech
Posts: 25
Joined: Sat Mar 03, 2012 1:21 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Wed Mar 07, 2012 5:41 am

For some inspiration why not visit http://www.bwired.nl show juast what can be done, I think he did a lot of the soldering himcelf.

bradburts
Posts: 341
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:07 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Wed Mar 07, 2012 8:20 am

Sounds good Ian.

Which RF dongle did you use in the end? Does that dongle do the IR as well?

I ended up getting an Arduino and 433MHz module. Objected to the price of the ready built USB RF modules. The RF side will cost me £14 and half a life time of coding to go :)

A little side tracked at the moment as I am turning the Arduino into a general purpose IO subsystem system. Hopefull others will benefit from that effort.

Ianw
Posts: 46
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:54 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Wed Mar 07, 2012 5:43 pm

I used the Arduino and a 433mhz transmitter in the end and for the IR used a high intensity IR LED on the end of a 10m length of cat5! also put a 1-wire temp sensor on the same cable for living room temp.  Essentially wrote a number of c++ programs that send serial commands over the Arduino FTDI USB which in turn triggered pre-programmed actions on the Arduino and used a tomcat web server with the c++ running as CGI and some python scripts for the automation control (thermostat etc).

Once the Pi has turned up and had a bit of a test/debug will post up the ins and outs.

I also came to the same conclusion on the ready made RF dongles, waaaaay too expensive for what they are!

That bi-wired site looks awesome! will have a read!

bradburts
Posts: 341
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:07 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Wed Mar 07, 2012 7:22 pm

Sounds great.

Would be very interested to read & crib when you're ready.

Vestus
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:09 pm

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Fri Mar 09, 2012 3:29 pm

One source for relays you all may want to look at is cnc4pc.com . Most of their items are geared toward the CNC building crowd and designed to trigger off of parallel port signals.

alchoper
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Mar 25, 2012 1:21 pm

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sun Mar 25, 2012 2:35 pm

Edit by Abishur: You posted this exact same information linking to a commercial product 4 times in rapid succession.  I'd like to think that since they were on topic in the threads you posted them to that you were just trying to be helpful, but 4 times in such rapid succession as your first 4 posts ever comes off as a little spammy.  If that was just an unfortunate accident, I hope you stick around and keep contributing, but I do ask that you refrain from posting links to commercial products until we get to know you a little better

thushar
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Mar 30, 2012 10:25 pm

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Fri Mar 30, 2012 11:30 pm

celerity said:



Something like:

if room-temp < 19C and solar-output > 2000W then turn on heater

I"m not comfortable with a soldering iron or Arduino programming, so I"m ideally looking for an off-the-shelf product I can control with the RPi.

Any advice appreciated, thank you,

/\dam


The easiest and simple way to achieve this is to use a solar immersion switch - available  from http://solarimmersionheaterswitch.co.uk/ .

bradburts
Posts: 341
Joined: Sun Oct 02, 2011 7:07 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sat Mar 31, 2012 8:21 am

If you have a SunnyBoy inverter then you could drive a secondary relay from the SunnyBoy relay. The SB relay is programmable and can be turned on when PV>some threshold.

You will need an electrician to install whichever solution you go for so. The SB relay solution would save you the cost of the switch (a secondary relay would cost you £20 or so).

That leaves you with a thermostat switch somewhere.

A good heating engineer would be able to do it all for you.

Phil Spiegel
Posts: 210
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2012 8:17 am
Contact: Website

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automation)

Sat Mar 31, 2012 8:28 am

An alternative, and 'safe' way to implement this or something similar is to use a wireless-remote controlled mains socket - you can buy various packs off-the-shelf with 1 - 4 sockets from a single trnasmitter, and with unique codes.

By modding the handset - (note -mine are all 12V, but some may be different) you should be able to get The Raspberry Pi Computer(R) to be able to switch 4 devices on or off (unoque commands for each state)  with no mains interconnection.  Sensors feeding into the Board or via ethernet can provide the control input.

A good use for one of the various I/O boards being created.. the possibilites are endless.

Hoagie
Posts: 119
Joined: Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:19 pm

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:45 pm

I have a system working with these on my Pi. Status remote control power sockets from Morrisons. 3 for 5 quid when you buy petrol a while ago.

I used one of these http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1Pcs-New-433M ... 880wt_1271 -hope this link works. If not, search ebay for 433mhz transmitter and look for the one with two small PCBs, one is rectangular with 4 pins, the other is square and only has 3. It was 99p from Hong Kong, so it takes a wile to arrive, but it does everything I wanted.

I connected the receiver to a PC sound card via a 1M resistor to avoid any damage. Then sampled the codes from the mains socket remote control using Audacity. It Looks like the signal is time encoded, with some pulses being 3 times as long as others. Presumably long ones are 1s and short are 0s or the other way around. Anyway, it doesn't matter the software outputs the data as a string of binary at a fixed rate, long or short pulses are just encoded as a string of the same digit.

The transmitter is connected to GPIO7 and the +5 and Gnd lines of the PI. It gets ample power that way, and GPIO7 controls it nicely.

My software is an executable that takes takes channel and on or off parameters. I can use crontab to do things, or manually drive it via a simple web front end, or a command line.

I'll put a full article with pictures, listings and things together and post a link soon.

dauhee
Posts: 59
Joined: Fri Sep 07, 2012 1:50 pm

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Sun Sep 30, 2012 5:45 pm

dynamicdns.org can be used for free as opposed to DynDns

I have a byebyestandby online controller v2.9 (27 pounds) and socket connections (10 pounds for 2) and am sending UDP commands from my RPi. byebyestandby stock is very cheap (old product range) so will allow me to transition into doing my own 433Mhz RF receive + send - currently I have the chips, just don't know how to hook them up to the RPi :)

Will be trawling the net on schematic to connect the RF modules in the RPi GPIO and also the code to command/listen. Any help would be appreciated!!!

pmk
Posts: 21
Joined: Wed Jun 20, 2012 5:27 pm

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Thu Feb 21, 2013 3:11 pm

Hoagie, have you done any more work on this as I am just starting to look at this myself and would like some further info if you have it.

SiriusHardware
Posts: 502
Joined: Thu Aug 02, 2012 9:09 pm
Location: UK

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Fri Feb 22, 2013 9:02 pm

As far as I know, Hoagie did indeed take this further as it appears to be an article by him in The Magpi issue 8 (http://www.themagpi.com) detailing the use of RF controlled mains sockets, using the Pi to generate the necessary serial data and feeding it to a dumb RF transmitter module. Nice article.

The more low-tech approach would also work - use the original remote which came with the sockets and get the Pi to 'press' the switches on it - for example use the Pi to drive a transistor to drive a relay, connect the normally open relay contacts across the on/off press switch contacts of the remote and the Pi can then toggle the mains device on and off by turning the relay on for a second, then off.

Or, similar approach, but use the Pi to drive the led of an optocoupler and connect the optocoupler's transistor across the switch contacts on the RF remote - in this case the polarity of the optocoupler output connection to the switch contacts matters, - if it doesn't work one way, try it the other way. Of course, this will also work equally well with IR-remotes, so a Pi combined with some optocouplers and a cheap one-for-all remote can potentially control just about anything.

szita
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 5:49 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Mon Sep 23, 2013 5:52 am

hey. I get this error code:

Code: Select all

[email protected] ~/433Utils/RPi_utils $ make
g++    -c -o RemoteTransmitter.o RemoteTransmitter.cpp
RemoteTransmitter.cpp: In static member function ‘static void RemoteTransmitter::sendTelegram(long unsigned int, byte)’:
RemoteTransmitter.cpp:54:47: error: ‘B111’ was not declared in this scope
RemoteTransmitter.cpp: In static member function ‘static void RemoteTransmitter::sendCode(byte, long unsigned int, unsigned int, byte)’:
RemoteTransmitter.cpp:72:28: error: ‘B111’ was not declared in this scope
RemoteTransmitter.cpp:80:19: error: ‘B11’ was not declared in this scope
make: *** [RemoteTransmitter.o] Error 1
What could be the problem remotetransmitter.cpp the file? Help! Thanks in advance. RemoteTransmitter.cpp :

Code: Select all

/*
 * RemoteSwitch library v2.3.0 (20121229) made by Randy Simons http://randysimons.nl/
 * See RemoteTransmitter.h for details.
 *
 * License: GPLv3. See license.txt
 */

#include "RemoteTransmitter.h"


/************
* RemoteTransmitter
************/

RemoteTransmitter::RemoteTransmitter(byte pin, unsigned int periodusec, byte repeats) {
	_pin=pin;
	_periodusec=periodusec;
	_repeats=repeats;

	pinMode(_pin, OUTPUT);
}

unsigned long RemoteTransmitter::encodeTelegram(byte trits[]) {
	unsigned long data = 0;

	// Encode data
	for (byte i=0;i<12;i++) {
		data*=3;
		data+=trits[i];
	}

	// Encode period duration
	data |= (unsigned long)_periodusec << 23;

	// Encode repeats
	data |= (unsigned long)_repeats << 20;

	return data;
}

void RemoteTransmitter::sendTelegram(byte trits[]) {
	sendTelegram(encodeTelegram(trits),_pin);
}

/**
* Format data:
* pppppppp|prrrdddd|dddddddd|dddddddd (32 bit)
* p = perioud (9 bit unsigned int
* r = repeats as 2log. Thus, if r = 3, then signal is sent 2^3=8 times
* d = data
*/
void RemoteTransmitter::sendTelegram(unsigned long data, byte pin) {
	unsigned int periodusec = (unsigned long)data >> 23;
	byte repeats = ((unsigned long)data >> 20) & B111;

	sendCode(pin, data, periodusec, repeats);
}

void RemoteTransmitter::sendCode(byte pin, unsigned long code, unsigned int periodusec, byte repeats) {
	code &= 0xfffff; // Truncate to 20 bit ;
	// Convert the base3-code to base4, to avoid lengthy calculations when transmitting.. Messes op timings.
	// Also note this swaps endianess in the process. The MSB must be transmitted first, but is converted to
	// LSB here. This is easier when actually transmitting later on.
	unsigned long dataBase4 = 0;

	for (byte i=0; i<12; i++) {
		dataBase4<<=2;
		dataBase4|=(code%3);
		code/=3;
	}

	repeats = 1 << (repeats & B111); // repeats := 2^repeats;

	for (byte j=0;j<repeats;j++) {
		// Sent one telegram

		// Recycle code as working var to save memory
		code=dataBase4;
		for (byte i=0; i<12; i++) {
			switch (code & B11) {
				case 0:
					digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec);
					digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec*3);
					digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec);
					digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec*3);
					break;
				case 1:
					digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec*3);
					digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec);
					digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec*3);
					digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec);
					break;
				case 2: // KA: X or float
					digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec);
					digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec*3);
					digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec*3);
					digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
					delayMicroseconds(periodusec);
					break;
			}
			// Next trit
			code>>=2;
		}

		// Send termination/synchronization-signal. Total length: 32 periods
		digitalWrite(pin, HIGH);
		delayMicroseconds(periodusec);
		digitalWrite(pin, LOW);
		delayMicroseconds(periodusec*31);
	}
}

boolean RemoteTransmitter::isSameCode(unsigned long encodedTelegram, unsigned long receivedData) {
	return (receivedData==(encodedTelegram & 0xFFFFF)); // compare the 20 LSB's
}


/************
* ActionTransmitter
************/

ActionTransmitter::ActionTransmitter(byte pin, unsigned int periodusec, byte repeats) : RemoteTransmitter(pin,periodusec,repeats) {
	// Call constructor
}


void ActionTransmitter::sendSignal(byte systemCode, char device, boolean on) {
	sendTelegram(getTelegram(systemCode,device,on), _pin);
}

unsigned long ActionTransmitter::getTelegram(byte systemCode, char device, boolean on) {
	byte trits[12];

	device-=65;

	for (byte i=0; i<5; i++) {
		// Trits 0-4 contain address (2^5=32 addresses)
		trits[i]=(systemCode & 1)?1:2;
		systemCode>>=1;

		// Trits 5-9 contain device. Only one trit has value 0, others have 2 (float)!
		trits[i+5]=(i==device?0:2);
	}

	// Switch on or off
	trits[10]=(!on?0:2);
	trits[11]=(on?0:2);

	return encodeTelegram(trits);
}

/************
* BlokkerTransmitter
************/

BlokkerTransmitter::BlokkerTransmitter(byte pin, unsigned int periodusec, byte repeats) : RemoteTransmitter(pin,periodusec,repeats) {
	// Call constructor
}


void BlokkerTransmitter::sendSignal(byte device, boolean on) {
	sendTelegram(getTelegram(device,on), _pin);
}

unsigned long BlokkerTransmitter::getTelegram(byte device, boolean on) {
	byte trits[12]={0};

	device--;

	for (byte i=1; i<4; i++) {
		// Trits 1-3 contain device
		trits[i]=(device & 1)?0:1;
		device>>=1;
	}

	// Switch on or off
	trits[8]=(on?1:0);

	return encodeTelegram(trits);
}

/************
* KaKuTransmitter
************/

KaKuTransmitter::KaKuTransmitter(byte pin, unsigned int periodusec, byte repeats) : RemoteTransmitter(pin,periodusec,repeats) {
	// Call constructor
}

void KaKuTransmitter::sendSignal(char address, byte device, boolean on) {
	sendTelegram(getTelegram(address, device, on), _pin);
}

unsigned long KaKuTransmitter::getTelegram(char address, byte device, boolean on) {
	byte trits[12];

	address-=65;
	device-=1;

	for (byte i=0; i<4; i++) {
		// Trits 0-3 contain address (2^4 = 16 addresses)
		trits[i]=(address & 1)?2:0;
		address>>=1;

		// Trits 4-8 contain device (2^4 = 16 addresses)
		trits[i+4]=(device & 1)?2:0;
		device>>=1;
	}

	// Trits 8-10 seem to be fixed
	trits[8]=0;
	trits[9]=2;
	trits[10]=2;

	// Switch on or off
	trits[11]=(on?2:0);

	return encodeTelegram(trits);
}

void KaKuTransmitter::sendSignal(char address, byte group, byte device, boolean on) {
	sendTelegram(getTelegram(address, group, on), _pin);
}

unsigned long KaKuTransmitter::getTelegram(char address, byte group, byte device, boolean on) {
	byte trits[12], i;

	address-=65;
	group-=1;
	device-=1;

	// Address. M3E Pin A0-A3
	for (i=0; i<4; i++) {
		// Trits 0-3 contain address (2^4 = 16 addresses)
		trits[i]=(address & 1)?2:0;
		address>>=1;
	}

	// Device. M3E Pin A4-A5
	for (; i<6; i++) {
		trits[i]=(device & 1)?2:0;
		device>>=1;
	}

	// Group. M3E Pin A6-A7
	for (; i<8; i++) {
		trits[i]=(group & 1)?2:0;
		group>>=1;
	}

	// Trits 8-10 are be fixed. M3E Pin A8/D0-A10/D2
	trits[8]=0;
	trits[9]=2;
	trits[10]=2;

	// Switch on or off, M3E Pin A11/D3
	trits[11]=(on?2:0);

	return encodeTelegram(trits);
}


/************
* ElroTransmitter
************/

ElroTransmitter::ElroTransmitter(byte pin, unsigned int periodusec, byte repeats) : RemoteTransmitter(pin, periodusec, repeats) {
	//Call constructor
}

void ElroTransmitter::sendSignal(byte systemCode, char device, boolean on) {
	sendTelegram(getTelegram(systemCode, device, on), _pin);
}

unsigned long ElroTransmitter::getTelegram(byte systemCode, char device, boolean on) {
	byte trits[12];

	device-=65;

	for (byte i=0; i<5; i++) {
		//trits 0-4 contain address (2^5=32 addresses)
		trits[i]=(systemCode & 1)?0:2;
		systemCode>>=1;

		//trits 5-9 contain device. Only one trit has value 0, others have 2 (float)!
		trits[i+5]=(i==device?0:2);
	}

	//switch on or off
	trits[10]=(on?0:2);
	trits[11]=(!on?0:2);

	return encodeTelegram(trits);
}

szita
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Sep 23, 2013 5:49 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Wed Nov 13, 2013 2:06 pm

Hi, develops, unfortunately I could not even fix the leds, you might chance? Thanks, welcome screen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ai59MoxTD5A

amorphic
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Oct 31, 2013 12:27 am

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Sun Jan 19, 2014 9:16 pm

For anybody still looking for a means of controlling power sockets from their Pi (or any other computer with a USB socket):

http://jimter.net/how-to-build-a-usb-po ... th-python/

johndough
Posts: 254
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 2:00 pm

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Sun Jan 19, 2014 9:29 pm

kme wrote:Quote from celerity on November 28, 2011, 18:08
We use 240V here in the UK, although I'm sure that doesn't alter what you're saying.Well, actually you don't. You run 230V and have done that for 10-15 years when EU harmonized UK 240V with continental Europe's 220V and everything ended up being 230V. It really didn't matter much as the switch was within the normal voltage fluctuation anyway. But it did limit some confusion. EU actually does do make sense some times.

Hiya

UK voltage should be taken as 240 volts, yes with harmonisation 230 is quoted.

However a lot of substations have not been changed.

So the specification of 230 volts plus or minus 10% gives a wide spectrum, (207 - 253) and some manufacturers make 240v equipment for UK market still.
Experience taught them that a 230 rating had a shortened life.

So...

User avatar
ilovemipi
Posts: 161
Joined: Mon Dec 02, 2013 11:52 am
Location: UK + Cyprus
Contact: Website

Re: Controlling a mains power socket switch? (home automatio

Fri May 06, 2016 6:31 pm

Just to bring this old thread up to 2016 the Status and Nexa Sockets and even RF controlled Central Heating Thermostats can now be safely controlled over the internet with a free Blynk app plus a few parts (WeMos D1 Mini and RF Receiver / Transmitter set), total cost of around 4 quid .

Not directly linked to the Raspberry Pi but this thread was a major inspiration to the creator of the app.

Details available from http://community.blynk.cc/t/connect-you ... ynk/5925/9

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