richrarobi
Posts: 261
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2015 1:13 pm

Re: Looking for a sustainable case

Wed Feb 22, 2017 12:49 pm

Carbon offsets are complete tosh aren't they? Unless you're planning to fill the empty oil well with carbon it's just a con.
It is all a load of "politically (in)correct mumbo-jumbo" (am I allowed to say "mumbo-jumbo"?) - I might know a local council (maybe Bracknell) where (I am told) residents have to pay for collection of their "green" waste, and the "collectors" just are seen to bung it into the (land-fill or for burning) ordinary collection truck (maybe it was a bad day?).

This (England) is a very sick and selfish country.
The "government" only cares about getting elected again, and lining their own pockets.

p.s. perspex is recyclable I believe (oil product?) - isn't something like a simple two sided Camac style case (two bits of perspex and standoffs) actually more environmentally friendly than cutting down walnut trees to make a few planks? I like the idea of using old cigar or tea boxes - try an old fashioned tea shop for tea boxes? Good one up the hill in Lincoln?

p.s. Laser cutting? Whatever happened to fretsaws?
p.p.s Amended in case the thought police are in attendance... :shock:
Last edited by richrarobi on Wed Feb 22, 2017 2:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.

PiGraham
Posts: 3321
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 12:37 pm
Location: Waterlooville

Re: Looking for a sustainable case

Wed Feb 22, 2017 1:47 pm

richrarobi wrote:
I know a local council (Bracknell) where residents have to pay for collection of their "green" waste, and the "collectors" just bung it into the (land-fill or for burning) ordinary collection truck.
I'm not surprised you give no reference for that claim. In this era of fake news it's important to check and give sources, if you have them, and be responsible by not posting reactionary gossip if you don't have reliable sources.

User avatar
rurwin
Forum Moderator
Forum Moderator
Posts: 4247
Joined: Mon Jan 09, 2012 3:16 pm
Contact: Website

Re: Looking for a sustainable case

Thu Feb 23, 2017 9:43 am

PiGraham wrote:
richrarobi wrote:
I know a local council (Bracknell) where residents have to pay for collection of their "green" waste, and the "collectors" just bung it into the (land-fill or for burning) ordinary collection truck.
I'm not surprised you give no reference for that claim. In this era of fake news it's important to check and give sources, if you have them, and be responsible by not posting reactionary gossip if you don't have reliable sources.
In this case there may be no evidence to give. I can't find anything online. Even if this was fake news I would expect to find something; if there was a real story there I would have expected some media to have picked it up. Maybe it is more likely that the council are using the same compactor lorries for both jobs and this has been noticed by residents who jump to the wrong conclusions.

Whether wood is carbon negative might be over-stating, but it is certainly very low foot-print. The wood itself is carbon neutral but there is some carbon required to process it (and drive the laser). It is far and away a lower footprint than using new plastic.

There's a fascinating book I have about sustainability called "Time to Eat The Dog?" and it makes some interesting calculations. For example it consumes less carbon for four people to commute to work in one car if they power themselves with locally grown potatoes than it would be for them to cycle to work, take a shower there and power themselves with imported beef-burgers.

Wood has no effect on carbon if it grows, dies and decays. Any work done on it will emit carbon. However if one was to grow a tree organically with minimal, locally sourced supplies, chop it down by hand using no more calories than one would ordinarily consume, prepare and season it by hand likewise and use it for projects using only hand-tools and no metal or synthetic fixings, then that should be carbon neutral. If one were to convert all the waste to charcoal and bury that deeply, I imagine one might produce a negative carbon foot-print.

There are two issues here of course: sustainability and carbon foot-print. They are not the same although they are both worthwhile issues and meet in oil, gas and coal. A wooden case is clearly sustainable --- trees can be grown any time one wants -- and it has a low but non-zero carbon footprint. Plastic is not sustainable and has a high footprint. However anything saved from landfill for a new life as a Pi case has a carbon footprint even lower than (new) wood no mattter what it is made of and its sustainability is not an issue.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, in that order.

Koeshi
Posts: 227
Joined: Sun Mar 20, 2016 11:16 am

Re: Looking for a sustainable case

Thu Feb 23, 2017 12:40 pm

Not directly related to his anecdote, but there is a problem with material sent for recycling either being placed in landfills or stored so that it technically isn't in a landfill.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... apses.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/b ... dfill.html

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/huge- ... -6zpvrgcpg

PiGraham
Posts: 3321
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 12:37 pm
Location: Waterlooville

Re: Looking for a sustainable case

Thu Feb 23, 2017 12:56 pm

Koeshi wrote:Not directly related to his anecdote, but there is a problem with material sent for recycling either being placed in landfills or stored so that it technically isn't in a landfill.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... apses.html

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/earth/b ... dfill.html

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/huge- ... -6zpvrgcpg
All rather speculative stuff from the Daily Mail, with no actual facts. What is actually happening right now?
Typical Daily Mail fake news.

The Telegraph does give some numbers, and they are pretty impressive.
In 2007/08, 134,000 tons of recycling was dumped – 1.5 per cent of the total 8.8 million tons collected.
The message would seem to be that it's working well and if people were more careful about what they put into recycling bins there weould be less contaminated material that had to be thrown away and the figures even better.

The Times is downright misleading with the byline accessible on the free wide of the paywall:
The amount of household waste rejected for recycling has increased by more than 80 per cent over the past four years, raising questions about how simple it is for people to identify material that can be reused.
Wow, that's terrible, isn't it? 80% increase in recycling not being recycled! Actually, they don't give enough info to put it in context.
From the Telegraph's figures (They say 40% comparable figure) that's a rise from 134,000 tonnes to 184,000 tonnes, or just 50,000 tonnes of about 9 million tonnes collected. That's about 0.5 percentage points increase. Hardly a crisis.

I'd call that disgracefully misleading reporting by Mail and Times. Telegraph comes off a little better for giving the facts behind the misleading headline.
Last edited by PiGraham on Thu Feb 23, 2017 1:16 pm, edited 4 times in total.

PiGraham
Posts: 3321
Joined: Fri Jun 07, 2013 12:37 pm
Location: Waterlooville

Re: Looking for a sustainable case

Thu Feb 23, 2017 1:00 pm

rurwin wrote: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, in that order.
Absolutely!

killorP
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 1:22 pm
Contact: Website

Re: Looking for a sustainable case

Wed Dec 27, 2017 1:46 pm

Hi!!

Last units available in AMAZON warehouse...

Image

Merry Christmas and happy year 2018 to all

killorP
Posts: 27
Joined: Wed Jun 15, 2016 1:22 pm
Contact: Website

Re: Looking for a sustainable case

Wed Mar 28, 2018 10:56 am

PiGraham wrote:
Thu Feb 23, 2017 1:00 pm
rurwin wrote: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, in that order.
Absolutely!
I agree,
With that premise I'm pressing on less bulky designs
and use the least possible material ....
Example of this idea, in the design of this new wooden case for Raspberry Pi 3+,
that I use screws for its assembly (see this thread) viewtopic.php?f=93&t=208845

For me, the designs of enclosure made by layers of acrylic seems to me a waste of material ..

Return to “Other projects”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests