nicksimms
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Sep 11, 2011 6:33 pm

Re: Security Camera for my disabled child

Sun Sep 11, 2011 7:49 pm

I have a 8 year old son with Cereberal Palsey and Epilepsy who requires 24 hours care and finding a really good camera system to montor my son is incredable hard on a tight budget so here is my use for the Pi

I intend to use this as a dedicated computer for the the camera. The computer is linked to a PVR to record any epileptic episodes (head shot only) . This can then be show to his doctors as his episodes are primarily at night times as well having different types of fit from absent to full blown tonic clonic.

Not only that its also portable so he will be able to sleep over at his grandparents now as well go on holidays.

I have 2 mins to apply his medication or an episode can last for up to 45 mins and involve a trip to the hospital. The Pi has given me and my wife the ability to not only stop thease faster but be able to record for the doctors so they can see them as there treating him

Thank you for this gift and i intend to pass this on to all the disabled familys i know as well as support forums. I hope you can understand the magnitude of what this will do to change parents life

iAreNewb
Posts: 59
Joined: Sun Aug 28, 2011 4:27 pm

Re: Security Camera for my disabled child

Sun Sep 11, 2011 8:10 pm

I hope that the R-Pi will suffice for this need, and definitely wish for your son to benefit as much as possible from it. However, I feel obliged to tell you, since you're a new user, that the R-Pi is not available for purchase until the end of November this year.

Assuming that this is acceptable, I assure you that it should not be difficult to connect the R-Pi with a standard, relatively cheap webcam (or your choice of camera, as I mentioned you noticed), a few standard batteries, and perhaps an external hard drive (or possibly a flash drive or large SD card, but I think that those would not provide enough storage for 24/7 monitoring).

This setup would provide a relatively high quality video, enough electricity to run about 3 days of monitoring 24/7 (or even far longer [weeks or months], if you are willing, and if it is possible for your use case, to use larger and more expensive batteries). If you want to simultaneously power the R-Pi and charge the batteries when the setup is stationary (such as during the night, while your child is sleeping), this should also be possible and provide months/years of stable power (depending on the batteries' life cycle of charges).

In theory, you could also utilize a number of other power options, as you might discover the need or convenience -- for instance, solar power or kinetic (if you child uses a wheelchair, it might be possible to power/charge the R-Pi simply using the power generated by the wheels' rotation).

If you want to set up a live monitoring and/or automatic video back up, you can attach a Wi-Fi dongle and backup this feed to an external source (your own PC or a cloud backup service).

I hope that this listing of choices is helpful for you and your family; again, I wish you the best of luck in ensuring your child's safety.

stuporhero
Posts: 125
Joined: Fri Aug 19, 2011 2:02 pm

Re: Security Camera for my disabled child

Sun Sep 11, 2011 8:51 pm

Hmmm... That GPU - does it do video compression?? :D

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liz
Raspberry Pi Foundation Employee & Forum Moderator
Raspberry Pi Foundation Employee & Forum Moderator
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Joined: Thu Jul 28, 2011 7:22 pm
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Re: Security Camera for my disabled child

Sun Sep 11, 2011 9:08 pm

Quote from nicksimms on September 11, 2011, 20:49
I have a 8 year old son with Cereberal Palsey and Epilepsy who requires 24 hours care and finding a really good camera system to montor my son is incredable hard on a tight budget so here is my use for the Pi

I intend to use this as a dedicated computer for the the camera. The computer is linked to a PVR to record any epileptic episodes (head shot only) . This can then be show to his doctors as his episodes are primarily at night times as well having different types of fit from absent to full blown tonic clonic.

Not only that its also portable so he will be able to sleep over at his grandparents now as well go on holidays.

I have 2 mins to apply his medication or an episode can last for up to 45 mins and involve a trip to the hospital. The Pi has given me and my wife the ability to not only stop thease faster but be able to record for the doctors so they can see them as there treating him

Thank you for this gift and i intend to pass this on to all the disabled familys i know as well as support forums. I hope you can understand the magnitude of what this will do to change parents life

Boy.

The crazy thing is that initially, we had doubts about including a camera as part of the device - being as imaginative as you need to be when producing something like Raspberry Pi is very much a learned skill - we're much better at it than we were two years ago when we were hammering out the schematics for the first bit of hardware. This sort of post, alongside some emails we've received, has made it very clear to us how important camera support and an additional camera module is.

Initially, plugging a third-party camera in won't be an issue for you, from the sounds of it, but if you want something smaller and more portable we're working with some optical sensor people at the moment and will definitely be able to provide you with a small camera add-on some time next year which you can use as an integrated part of the board. As to Stuporhero's point - yes, you can do onboard video compression, so that shouldn't present any problems.

If you want to make, market and sell a monitoring device for people in your position, we are as supportive as can be. I'd love to see you disseminating something like what you've imagined as widely as possible. Give us a shout if you need any help - absolutely no strings attached.
Director of Communications, Raspberry Pi

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