dmitchell
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Oct 15, 2013 5:05 pm

Controlling a Jukebox with pi

Tue Oct 15, 2013 5:41 pm

When I first read about the raspberry pi, I was fascinated with the possiblities and began thinking of a good first project. I had read several stories about people connecting vintage jukebox wallboxes to a pi in order to select computer streamed music, but I wanted to do just the opposite. I have a 1959 Seeburg 222 jukebox in my basement gameroom, and I wanted to remotely select songs just like would be done with a wallbox. I have the basic function working well, although I may still add some features to the user interface.

The way wallboxes transmit song requests to the main jukebox is through a series of pulses, that are then decoded by a stepper unit in the main jukebox. Seeburg jukeboxes are nice for this project since most of them come with the stepper unit built in, where other brands sometimes needed steppers added seperately.

In order to generate the proper pulses, I am using a Sainsmart 2 channel relay board directly attached to the GPIO on my pi, driven by a small python program. Since the relay board interprets GPIO low as activating the relay in my program when I initialize the gpio pin it is immedately set to high and drop it to low to send a pulse. I also had to experiment with different length of pulses and pauses go get the stepper to accurately select the correct song. The simple user interface to the program is created using jquery mobile intended to be used from a smartphone or ipad. I am using bottle to use as the web framework as it set up quickly and provides all the features I needed.

I will post a video of it working soon, and a link to source code in case anyone is interested. Comments and questions welcomed.

Gracewind
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Dec 13, 2018 6:51 am

Re: Controlling a Jukebox with pi

Thu Dec 13, 2018 6:58 am

Hi, I know your post has been a long time ago, but I am new to Raspberry and saw your posting today. I have a jukebox too and would like to use a Raspberry to control a jukebox by simulating a wallbox. If you are still interested to provide any details that you can suggest to create the same I would greatly appreciate the information. Many thanks.

ljjf
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:23 pm
Contact: Facebook

Re: Controlling a Jukebox with pi

Thu Jan 16, 2020 8:01 pm

We at Liberty Jersey Jukebox Farm are doing exactly that .. controlling a classic jukebox using a LAN connected Rpi and any device that runs a decent web browser like Chrome. We can be found on Facebook or [email protected]. Although it started as a way to makes some buck$, it's now a hobbyist project. We're looking to expand the supported jukebox manufacture/model to be more than Wurlitzers. .. Right now, looking to code the signals from a Seeburg DEC Consolette for controlling STD models as well as all the others. Anyone?

ljjf
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:23 pm
Contact: Facebook

Re: Controlling a Jukebox with pi

Thu Jan 16, 2020 9:11 pm

I'm interested in the pulse train/timing needed to select the songs on the Seeburg 222.
dmitchell wrote:
Tue Oct 15, 2013 5:41 pm
When I first read about the raspberry pi, I was fascinated with the possiblities and began thinking of a good first project. I had read several stories about people connecting vintage jukebox wallboxes to a pi in order to select computer streamed music, but I wanted to do just the opposite. I have a 1959 Seeburg 222 jukebox in my basement gameroom, and I wanted to remotely select songs just like would be done with a wallbox. I have the basic function working well, although I may still add some features to the user interface.

The way wallboxes transmit song requests to the main jukebox is through a series of pulses, that are then decoded by a stepper unit in the main jukebox. Seeburg jukeboxes are nice for this project since most of them come with the stepper unit built in, where other brands sometimes needed steppers added seperately.

In order to generate the proper pulses, I am using a Sainsmart 2 channel relay board directly attached to the GPIO on my pi, driven by a small python program. Since the relay board interprets GPIO low as activating the relay in my program when I initialize the gpio pin it is immedately set to high and drop it to low to send a pulse. I also had to experiment with different length of pulses and pauses go get the stepper to accurately select the correct song. The simple user interface to the program is created using jquery mobile intended to be used from a smartphone or ipad. I am using bottle to use as the web framework as it set up quickly and provides all the features I needed.

I will post a video of it working soon, and a link to source code in case anyone is interested. Comments and questions welcomed.

ljjf
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:23 pm
Contact: Facebook

Re: Controlling a Jukebox with pi

Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:08 pm

Subject: Emulate a Wurlitzer 5250 Wallbox record selection Pulse train.
It's my understanding that many Seeburg, Rock-Ola, etc. used the same pulse train as the Wurlitzer jukebox. As such, these set of pulses should work OK with those too. But not guaranteed to do so.
This jukebox wallbox sends out a series of pulses that is used to 'step' a stepper motor on the jukebox, which in turn triggers the Jukebox to select and play the record.
Each pulse is 40mS 'on' and 40mS 'off'. There are 2 sets of pulses, separated by a 200mS 'off' state.
There is 1 pulse at the beginning of the 1st set of pulses, which I call the 'start' pulse. It's 40mS 'on' and 40mS 'off' also.
After the 'start' pulse, it sends a number for pulses to indicate the letter selection, where A=1, B=2 ... pulses. Note the letters 'I' and 'O" are not used. As such, the letter J=9, the letter P=13, and the letter V=20 pulses.
Then after the 200mS off time, it sends the selection number:1=1, 2=2 ... pulses.
Therefore, the pulse train for the record selection C7 is 4 pulses (start pulse + 3 pulses for the letter C), then a 200mS 'off' time, then 7 pulses.
This pulse train can be used to control a relay that pulses the appropriate power signal to the stepper motor on the jukebox.

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