gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many users?

Wed May 07, 2014 12:47 pm

Dear Community,

I have a project about building public hotspots using Raspberry Pi and wanted to share my experience with you.

The problem I am facing now is the low number of stations that can connect to the wireless network. Unfortunately, this limitation is not documented anywhere and as I wasn't aware of it, I assumed if AP mode works for an adapter it should support at least 40-50 clients. Well, I was wrong... :(

I've tried 3 different types of USB wifi sticks so far but unfortunately, none of them proved to be suitable for my use-case. Here is my experience with each, hopefully it will be useful to some of you:
  • TP-LINK TL-WN722N: provides a stable, strong signal and good coverage but the htc_9271 firmware it uses does not allow more than 7 stations to associate. Raising this limit within the driver code does not work as the firmware still prevents the 8th station to associate. Counting this limitation out, this adapter is probably the best choice for building an access point. It comes with a detachable 4 dBi antenna included which makes the coverage pretty nice, I could connect to the network with my smartphone from about 40 meters in a rather overloaded environment (downtown), with multiple walls between the devices. This adapter comes with an AR9271 SoC and therefore can be used with the ath9k_htc driver (included by default in recent kernel images). At last, but not at least, it is pretty cheap for its good quality and the long (3 years) warranty term the manufacturer provides.
  • TP-LINK TL-WN8200ND: this one has 2 detachable antennas, supports MIMO with 300 Mbps max. throughput and high-power operation. Its features would make it a very good choice to use as an AP but this adapter seems to be totally unusable currently. It comes with a Realtek 8192CU chipset which can be used with two drivers: "rtl8192cu" which is a pretty problematic, rather unstable driver compared to the vendor-provided "8192cu" driver, therefore recent kernel builds include the latter one by default. Unfortunately, none of these drivers are capable of handling master mode properly on Linux. Using rtl8192cu, no beacons are sent in master mode which makes it impossible to use this device as an AP. As far as I know, the reason is that the required driver functions are simply not implemented in the driver code currently. As of now, AP mode works only with a custom version of hostapd published by Realtek and the corresponding 8192cu driver but there are some issues with TX power/rate controlling and/or antenna handling and therefore clients can connect from ridiculously low distances only (about 5-6 cm) which makes this adapter totally useless to serve as an AP on Linux. The max. number of clients should be 32 according to the driver sources, although I'm unable to make any tests to confirm this.
  • Noname Realtek RTL8188CUS: a small, nano-sized USB adapter with an RTL8188CUS chipset. It's cheap, comes with a 3 dBi external antenna and works fine as an AP using the driver and hostapd provided by Realtek. According to a test I made, it can easily handle 12 simultaneous clients (might support more but I couldn't find more wifi devices for the testing). It doesn't provide as good coverage as the AR9271 based adapter but it is totally adequate for simple use-cases. It uses the same driver as the RTL8192CU chipset and therefore it should also support 32 clients in AP mode by default.
The next (and last) device I'm about to try comes with the Ralink RT5370 chipset which looks promising so far, I'll update this post as soon as I find any new information or have any test results to share.

Regards,
Gergely

Update1: taking a quick look at the source code of the rt2800usb driver, it seems there is no hard-coded limit on the number of stations so I assume that the available memory is the only boundary. I'm about to make some tests as soon as I get the new adapters and publish the results.

Update2: looking into the source more thoroughly, I found some precious information:

In rt2800.h it says:
"MAC_WCID_BASE: 8-bytes (use only 6 bytes) * 256 entry" - this basically means the adapter can store 256 client MAC addresses in its memory if I understand correctly. That looks great but after going a bit deeper I found this:

rt2800lib.c, line 1353:
"Since parts of the pairwise key table might be shared with the beacon frame buffers 6 & 7 we should only write into the first 222 entries."

After the comment, there's an iteration going from 33 up to 222 which should mean the adapter can handle 189 stations in total.

Update3:
Running through the sources of the 8192cu driver, I could find some interesting limits:

include/sta_info.h, line 29:
#define NUM_STA 32
#define NUM_ACL 16

This should mean that the driver supports 32 stations and 16 ACL entries in the MAC allow/deny table. Also, as no firmware is required for these chips, I assume the station table is stored in the system RAM which means it's likely this limit can be pushed upwards by modifying the source. :)
Last edited by gkiss1988 on Sun May 11, 2014 12:12 pm, edited 10 times in total.

clandestin0
Posts: 1
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:51 pm

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Wed May 07, 2014 10:52 pm

Hello,

I'm very interested in this topic, please keep posting about your results.
Thanks!

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Fri May 09, 2014 8:14 pm

Here are the limits and test results gathered in one post:
  • TP-LINK TL-WN722N: works fine and can handle 7 clients in total. The limit cannot be changed due to a firmware limitation.
    Test results: 7 clients can connect and use the AP without any issues.
  • TP-LINK TL-WN8200ND: not usable as an access point, currently due to a driver bug. According to the source code, it could handle 32 clients in total. The limit might be raised by changing the driver source.
    Test results: could not make any tests as clients are not able to connect from distances larger than 5-6 cm due to a TX power or antenna handling bug.
  • Realtek RTL8188CUS: works fine and can handle 32 clients in total. The limit could be pushed upwards by changing the driver's source code.
    Test results: 12 clients working fine, should be able to handle 32 clients but I didn't have a chance to test it.
  • Ralink RT5370: can handle 189 clients in total although I'm pretty sure performance would seriously drop above 40 stations. The limit cannot be changed due to overlapping with other tables stored in the same memory segment (ACL and pairwise key table).
    Test results: working like a charm with 30 clients, no connectivity issues, nice coverage and TX power (20 dBm by default which is the maximum allowed EIRP in my region).
I'm about to change the adapters in my hotspot devices to the Ralink RT5370 soon. :)

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Tue May 13, 2014 3:44 pm

Just a short update: the new adapter (Ralink RT5370) was installed in a hotspot unit yesterday and it has been providing stable operation so far. It seems the only drawback is that the coverage became about 20% worse than with the TL-WN722N adapter using the exact same settings (channel, mode, tx power) and antenna. :(

The environment is pretty crowded already (lots of 2.4 Ghz SSIDs around using almost all of the available frequencies) so I guess there is no other option besides installing a second device to have better coverage.

dnascimento
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu May 22, 2014 1:40 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Thu May 22, 2014 1:51 am

I use the Realtek RTL8188CUS. However, as soon as I start streaming from youtube, etc the connection becomes really slow :S I checked the CPU. It was running at 20%, memory (79/437MB)... Even the terminal is slow....

This is a clean installation only with MySQL... I followed these instructions: http://www.maketecheasier.com/set-up-ra ... cess-point

What is your performance/throughput? Any guess of what is my problem?

My iperf output is:
0.0-10.4 sec 1.12 MBytes 911 Kbits/sec

:(

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Fri Jun 06, 2014 1:37 pm

dnascimento wrote: What is your performance/throughput? Any guess of what is my problem?

My iperf output is:
0.0-10.4 sec 1.12 MBytes 911 Kbits/sec
It looks like the RPI's processing power puts a limit on the available throughput, I couldn't reach transfer speeds higher than 20 Mbps using the Ralink RT5370 adapter, the system load was constantly near 1.00 on the PI during the transfer (using latest wireless backports drivers).

I'm going to make some speed tests with the RTL8188CUS chip too to see how it performs and publish the results soon.

Joe Schmoe
Posts: 4277
Joined: Sun Jan 15, 2012 1:11 pm

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Fri Jun 06, 2014 2:32 pm

I'm curious as to why you want to do this with a Pi.

Don't get me wrong - I am intrigued by the concept and as a hacker (i.e., from a hacker perspective), I've played around with it a fair bit myself. But from a production/dollar perspective, I don't see it.

I can buy fully working wireless routers for $20. I can't see how you could come close to that price building it yourself with a Pi. Please enlighten me.
And some folks need to stop being fanboys and see the forest behind the trees.

(One of the best lines I've seen on this board lately)

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Fri Jun 06, 2014 3:13 pm

Joe Schmoe wrote:I can buy fully working wireless routers for $20. I can't see how you could come close to that price building it yourself with a Pi. Please enlighten me.
You are right with that but the devices I build are not simply wireless routers. Should I need that, I'd look for some commercial hardware that runs OpenWrt (or buy a Ubiquity device), configure as per my requirements and then just forget about it for months, knowing that it serves its purpose just fine.

Without saying too much, the devices I build have to work as:
  • access point
  • captive portal
  • router/firewall
  • web server (nginx) to forward requests to some external server adding a custom header to requests
  • caching proxy (squid) to avoid generating too much traffic towards the internet with repetitive HTTP requests and to filter HTTP requests by domain names and also MIME types (eg. no binary downloads, no streaming)
  • mobile broadband gateway (optional but often needed for locations without internet connection)
It's a requirement that the device has to be as small as possible, weather-proof, installable at outside locations and easy to repair. I might be wrong but buying a professional external AP would cost a lot more and being a low-cost project that was not an option (even if the AP would do everything I need).

On the other hand, the current hardware configuration might still change (there are only 2 locations so far), so if you are aware of some low-cost device which fullfil all of the requirements above, I'm all ears. :)

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Fri Jun 06, 2014 3:33 pm

I am amazed!

I've just replaced the wifi adapter with the Realtek 8188CUS and I could measure 40 Mbps throughput which is exactly the double of what I could achieve with the Ralink dongle.

CPU load was still a bit high though, went up to 1.90 after a while.

I made the test using the lastest drivers and patched hostapd provided by the vendor (v0.8 r7475).

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sat Jun 14, 2014 11:00 pm

UPDATE: I decided to build new devices with RTL8188CUS based adapters because:
  • they can provide much higher throughput with no additional CPU usage - the peak is near 50-51 Mbps which is very nice for a 1T1R device (tested with iperf in TCP mode)
  • the driver provided by Realtek seems to be more stable compared to the community maintained driver of the Ralink chip
  • there's a feature to get the best channel (the one with the less interference) through a /proc attribute (see below)
  • the adapter I chose (MICRONEXT MNWD152B) seems to provide a pretty stable signal and nice coverage
The only drawback is that the "best channel" feature does not work with kernels 3.10 and up because of some changes in the procfs filesystem's internals. This could be worked around by switching to a 3.9 kernel image.

Another surprising news is that the 3.9 kernel tree contains and older version of the Realtek driver which has an option to enable 64 clients to associate instead of the default 32. Looks like finally I found the perfect adapter/kernel combo for my use-case. :)

In the meantime I found a great way to test how many associations an adapter can handle: Atheros adapters have a feature which makes it possible to connect to multiple networks at the same time using virtual interfaces (VIFs). It turned out that USB devices (any adapter using the ath9k_htc driver) are not capable to connect to more than 2 SSIDs but luckily this limitation is not present for non-USB adapters.

Using my girlfriend's notebook, I could associate with my RPI access point with up to 63 clients (the first AID seems to be reserved for the adapter itself hence the smaller number).

I've attached the script used for the testing, hope it will be useful to someone.
Attachments
wifi-load-test.zip
Script to test max. number of associatations an AP can handle
(650 Bytes) Downloaded 598 times

billmacut
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Jul 22, 2014 2:38 pm

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Tue Jul 22, 2014 3:22 pm

Hi, I am Bill, 52 years old hardware eng. I have made little RPI project with help of my IT friends and
my son IT eng. as well.It is kind of tell them what a need and I am not to stupid to change it a little.
At this moment I am stuck at the point that my "helpers" say that If I will give them info what/how to do then they will help me again. The problem with my project is that it is small website on RPI accessible via wifi adaptor connected to RPI pcb. The system runs on Linux and it works but when I see wifi connection on PC then to open the RPI website I have to type in browser the IP address of my RPI pcb and the website is opening. It supposed to do it automaticly as soon as a PC is connected to wifi.
I was told that it has to be "captive portal" thing. I have no knowledge how it works but my interest is to work on my website - and this I can manage slowly on my own. If You could help me in the way that You could pass a example of instructions/code to be add to RPI then my helpers will
make it happen. I know that it is kind of like blind person asking to help start a car but I need this
engine running to charge battery so I can listen to the music - or something like this.
Regards
Bill

setiawan_alif
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Aug 07, 2014 9:02 pm

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Thu Aug 07, 2014 9:10 pm

hi all .. i want to ask about the TP-LINK WN722N driver. I tried to create a wireless hotspot with this but the drivers are not legible in hostapd.conf with a message like this:

Code: Select all

sudo /usr/sbin/hostapd /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf
Configuration file: /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf
Line 2: invalid/unknown driver 'ath9k_htc'
1 errors found in configuration file '/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf'
Can you help me?
and sorry for my english

hi2pi
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue May 28, 2013 11:09 pm
Location: USA
Contact: Website

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Fri Aug 08, 2014 12:12 pm

billmacut wrote:The system runs on Linux and it works but when I see wifi connection on PC then to open the RPI website I have to type in browser the IP address of my RPI pcb and the website is opening. It supposed to do it automaticly as soon as a PC is connected to wifi.
Several things going on here. I faced similar issues when developing my Pi-based system that serves web pages to Wi-Fi client devices, without any Internet connection. DNSMasq was key to making it all work.

There is no way to reliably force a browser to open a page. If your Pi is redirecting all http attempts to its internal web server, then it usually doesn't matter what http (not https) address the user types into the browser -- it will load your web page. Users shouldn't have to type in IP addresses. The user's browser might 'automatically' open your web page -- if the user has his browser set up to go to some website whenever it is launched. With DNSMasq, the user's DNS query will be answered with your self-assigned IP address of your web server.

But you will also face the dreaded Apple Captive Portal problem, wherein any Apple iOS device, when associated to a Wi-Fi access point, will try to contact Apple, looking for a particular file but using random addresses and file paths.

If the access point is not connected to the Internet, but only is connected to a LAN or is serving its own web pages, the iOS user will see a 'Log In' pseudo-browser. Fortunately, both the PirateBox and the LibraryBox have found ways to work around this misfeature (using special configuration of Lighttpd) and I recommend that you look into those projects. PirateBox has a version for Pi and perhaps LibraryBox will too eventually.

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Fri Nov 14, 2014 10:44 pm

setiawan_alif wrote:hi all .. i want to ask about the TP-LINK WN722N driver. I tried to create a wireless hotspot with this but the drivers are not legible in hostapd.conf with a message like this:

Code: Select all

sudo /usr/sbin/hostapd /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf
Configuration file: /etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf
Line 2: invalid/unknown driver 'ath9k_htc'
1 errors found in configuration file '/etc/hostapd/hostapd.conf'
Can you help me?
and sorry for my english
Hi,

sorry for the late reply, it's been a while since I logged in here.

The problem here is that simply there is no driver called "ath9k_htc" for hostapd. ath9k_htc is a valid kernel driver, indeed, but not a hostapd driver. Simply omit the "driver" setting from the config file to fix this. I've attached a working sample for a valid hostapd configuration that should work with any mac80211-compatible adapter, including the ath9k_htc.

Code: Select all

interface=wlan0
country_code=GB
ctrl_interface=/var/run/hostapd
ctrl_interface_group=0
ssid=mynetwork
hw_mode=g
channel=6
beacon_int=100
dtim_period=2
max_num_sta=50
rts_threshold=2347
fragm_threshold=2346
wmm_enabled=1
ap_isolate=1
ieee80211n=1
ht_capab=[SHORT-GI-20]
logger_syslog=-1
logger_syslog_level=2
logger_stdout=-1
logger_stdout_level=2
macaddr_acl=0
auth_algs=1
ignore_broadcast_ssid=0

hi2pi
Posts: 10
Joined: Tue May 28, 2013 11:09 pm
Location: USA
Contact: Website

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sat Nov 15, 2014 12:33 am

By the way, Node.js appears to be immune to the Apple Captive Portal problem (also called the Captive Network Assistant). If you install Node.js on your Pi, and install an NPM webserver like those available from Superstatic.org or Harpjs.com, it will be unnecessary to spoof the Apple websites or monitor the User Agent string. The connection is much quicker, the user gets your content right away.

npng
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jan 18, 2015 12:35 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sun Jan 18, 2015 1:11 am

I am after a similar project and get different results than yours regarding 8192CU.

Yes - I can associate many clients to my host, I tested with 12 devices.

However - as soon as I reach 8 simultaneous connections (needs to be an active TCP connection, so 8 users downloading a file through HTTP for example), the adapter "freezes".

Ping from a client to the host or from the host to the client returns "host unreacheable"
ifconfig on the host shows dropped TX packets

When I disable wifi on some of the clients to dissociate from the host, the adapter will start to work again when there are less than 8 clients connected.

I am using 2014-12-24 raspbian wheezy.

This is what I tried :
- downloaded and compiled hostapd from realtek (4.0.2_9000)
- patched hostapd 3.3 (https://github.com/pritambaral/hostapd-rtl871xdrv)
- disable power management (http://www.raspberrypi.org/forums/viewt ... 15#p397715)
- run off a powered hub
- tried on my ubuntu installation on my computer getting same results
- changed hostapd.conf in all imaginable manner

It really looks like a limitation on the adapter itself. I bought another adapter from a dfferent brand and got exactly the same result.

Looking at the driver code, I do not see any obvious limitation.

What device did you end up using? Are you able to use more than 8 simultaneous connections?

thanks,
Georges

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sun Jan 18, 2015 7:02 am

npng wrote:However - as soon as I reach 8 simultaneous connections (needs to be an active TCP connection, so 8 users downloading a file through HTTP for example), the adapter "freezes".

Ping from a client to the host or from the host to the client returns "host unreacheable"
ifconfig on the host shows dropped TX packets

When I disable wifi on some of the clients to dissociate from the host, the adapter will start to work again when there are less than 8 clients connected.

I am using 2014-12-24 raspbian wheezy.
It might be a driver bug or a limitation of hostapd itself. Try to increase max_num_sta, I'm not sure what its default value is. As you use a version of raspbian released more than half a year since my original post, some things might no longer be true... I'm not sure though.
This is what I tried :
[...]
- patched hostapd 3.3 (https://github.com/pritambaral/hostapd-rtl871xdrv)
[...]
I didn't use anything like that in my original setup so this might be the culprit. I know it's pretty old but try using hostapd from the Realtek driver sources without any modifications. That should work fine (or at least it did with the version I used originally).
What device did you end up using? Are you able to use more than 8 simultaneous connections?
It was the Ralink RT5370 but only because I didn't want to replace the adapter in devices already deployed and no new installations happened since then. For new installations, I plan to use an RTL8188CUS based adapter but it might be necessary to think about it again as things might have been changed since my tests made last May.

rodrigogp
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Mar 21, 2015 2:55 pm

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sat Mar 21, 2015 3:11 pm

Hi gkiss1988,

I was thinking of exploring the option of using RPi for something similar, so I googled to see if someone else did and got here. I'd need at least the following:

- access point
- captive portal
- router/firewall
- probably mobile broadband gateway too

Of course there are routers out there that could do that but I'm curious about this option.

Did you manage to achieve what you wanted? Do you have anything production ready?

Regards

gkiss1988
Posts: 13
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 10:09 am

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Wed Mar 25, 2015 9:15 am

rodrigogp wrote:Did you manage to achieve what you wanted? Do you have anything production ready?
Hi,

the devices built performed very well. The project is over so the devices are not being used anymore but they had been in production use for almost a year. With some modifications (wifi part replaced with an enterprise-grade solution and wired to the box using VLANs), one of the devices was successfully used at multiple summer festivals last year and it was performing very well even with ~40 simulatenous users.

I'm pretty sure that the new Raspbery Pi Model B+ would perform even better provided that it has a much stronger CPU (claimed to be 6 times faster than the original Model B).

Regards,
Gergely

arunkumaraymuo
Posts: 34
Joined: Fri Feb 15, 2013 1:06 pm

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Thu May 28, 2015 11:28 am

I tried TP-LINK TL-WN823N as wifi adaptor in Rapberry Pi. Worked the wifi. But I failed to start as hot spot .

MrEngman
Posts: 3844
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 2:17 pm
Location: Southampton, UK

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Thu May 28, 2015 1:06 pm

arunkumaraymuo wrote:I tried TP-LINK TL-WN823N as wifi adaptor in Rapberry Pi. Worked the wifi. But I failed to start as hot spot .
Take a look here. This works for me. The TL-WN823N uses the same driver as the EW-7811Un.


MrEngman
Simplicity is a prerequisite for reliability. Edsger W. Dijkstra

Please post ALL technical questions on the forum. Please Do Not send private messages.

Starlight5
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2015 12:54 pm

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sat May 30, 2015 6:49 pm

Did anyone try MT7610U 802.11ac adapters with 5db antenna sold on eBay? They look promising, but given the price I don't want to be the first to test.

MrEngman
Posts: 3844
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 2:17 pm
Location: Southampton, UK

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sat May 30, 2015 7:32 pm

Starlight5 wrote:Did anyone try MT7610U 802.11ac adapters with 5db antenna sold on eBay? They look promising, but given the price I don't want to be the first to test.
I think you will have real trouble finding a working driver for that for the Pi.


MrEngman
Simplicity is a prerequisite for reliability. Edsger W. Dijkstra

Please post ALL technical questions on the forum. Please Do Not send private messages.

Starlight5
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Apr 22, 2015 12:54 pm

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sat May 30, 2015 8:35 pm

MrEngman, indeed. However, somebody managed. But no details whether it'll need a powered hub, cpu utilization and throughput, and how many clients at once does it support. In the meantime I'm awaiting an RTL8188-based adapter, with 5db antenna as well, to arrive. Hope it really is RTL8188 and not something else.

Also, how about MT7601, the ones with detachable 2db antenna (and sometimes disguised as RaLink 5370) in particular? Guides cover the (troubled) installation process, not performance and throughput. =\

MrEngman
Posts: 3844
Joined: Fri Feb 03, 2012 2:17 pm
Location: Southampton, UK

Re: RPI as a hotspot - which WiFi adapter to use for many us

Sat May 30, 2015 10:55 pm

Starlight5 wrote:MrEngman, indeed. However, somebody managed. But no details whether it'll need a powered hub, cpu utilization and throughput, and how many clients at once does it support. In the meantime I'm awaiting an RTL8188-based adapter, with 5db antenna as well, to arrive. Hope it really is RTL8188 and not something else.

Also, how about MT7601, the ones with detachable 2db antenna (and sometimes disguised as RaLink 5370) in particular? Guides cover the (troubled) installation process, not performance and throughput. =\
I have compiled the mt7610 driver and it installs on the Pi but it is some enormous size ~16MB and the wifi does not work. I looked at the link you pointed to and applied the patches and then it failed to compile.


MrEngman
Simplicity is a prerequisite for reliability. Edsger W. Dijkstra

Please post ALL technical questions on the forum. Please Do Not send private messages.

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