jonathanmoneill
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2018 6:38 pm

Set Up RPI Model B as NAS: OMV vs Other Approaches

Sun Oct 14, 2018 11:14 pm

Hi All,

I've seen a number of how articles on this suggesting I should use OpenMediaVault while other articles suggest that setting up manually on a raspbian install is the way to go but I've seen little to justify either decision. This is totally a recreational project for me and I do enjoy the idea of setting it all up but at the same time the fundamental decider for me would be levels of functionality and quality of the user experience across the Android and Windows platforms. If anyone can advise me as to which approach would be more appropriate I'd really appreciate that.

Thanks in advance,

Jonny

PhatFil
Posts: 530
Joined: Thu Apr 13, 2017 3:55 pm

Re: Set Up RPI Model B as NAS: OMV vs Other Approaches

Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:29 am

if you want a number of users with differing access privileges perhaps the OMV route is best for administrating and maintaining all the user profiles and access rights. I found OMV rather clunky and a slow laggy web interface, which didnt play well other servers... but perhaps i had overloaded the system with Pete Scargills christmas set up script??

If however your going to provide guest/pi/ users full access to everything it may be a lot easier to simply install samba and create a few shares.

on my pi3b nas solution i started with OMV and later wiped the sd with a fresh raspbian bversion onto which i installed samba and added root shares to each of the disks.

btw afaik the pi3b is limited to 6x usb hdds, add 7 or more and only 6 will be seen..

jonathanmoneill
Posts: 6
Joined: Wed Mar 28, 2018 6:38 pm

Re: Set Up RPI Model B as NAS: OMV vs Other Approaches

Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:07 pm

PhatFil wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 9:29 am
if you want a number of users with differing access privileges perhaps the OMV route is best for administrating and maintaining all the user profiles and access rights. I found OMV rather clunky and a slow laggy web interface, which didnt play well other servers... but perhaps i had overloaded the system with Pete Scargills christmas set up script??

If however your going to provide guest/pi/ users full access to everything it may be a lot easier to simply install samba and create a few shares.

on my pi3b nas solution i started with OMV and later wiped the sd with a fresh raspbian bversion onto which i installed samba and added root shares to each of the disks.

btw afaik the pi3b is limited to 6x usb hdds, add 7 or more and only 6 will be seen..
Thanks for the input :) 99.99% of the time it would just be myself using but I think I would like to be able to share with friends or other users easily. I should say though it's not an RPi 3 it's the original model B I'm looking at but the only storage will be a seperately powered 500GB external hard drive and a 128GB USB stick so I'm hoping it should be fine.

jsimmonstx
Posts: 6
Joined: Fri Sep 21, 2018 8:06 pm

Re: Set Up RPI Model B as NAS: OMV vs Other Approaches

Thu Oct 18, 2018 12:58 pm

Everything below is my own personal opinion. It is not meant to insult or demean, so please accept it in the manner intended.

I'm of the opinion that Raspberry Pi (up and including the 3B+) is inadequate to serve as a NAS (in the truest sense of the word). I say this mostly because of the throughput restrictions of the USB ports. If you're hell-bent on using a SBC, I'd get something more substantial with USB 3.0 ports. There are a number of candidates that run from $45-120 that would make a more viable file server box.

On the other hand, I would seriously consider building a minimal PC (dual-core AMD AM3/AM3+ CPU, 4gb of RAM, and a motherboard with 4-6 SATA ports), and then put Linux Mint on it. If you want to go really light-weight, you could use Lubuntu instead of Mint, but you'll have to work a little harder at making it a viable file server. It's lacking some of the software needed to "make it go", but that's easily remedied by installing the missing apps.

Why do I say Mint (or any other plain Linux distro) instead of OMV?

0) Because OMV is NOT tolerant of what it sees as dicey hardware. I initially tried OMV on a reasonably new SSD, and it told me there were bad sectors on the drive. When I ran a check on the drive, it came back with no bad sectors. OMV would only run until it tried to write one of its log files, and then it would simply not recover from what it thought was a bad sector, presenting an endless chain of the same error, and because it was doing this, the web admin page presented a 500 error. NO OTHER LINUX DISTRIBUTION had a problem with the drive.

1) OMV had issues with booting. It kept telling me that ALL of the drives in the system "failed the soft reset", but would boot and everything appeared to be fine. NO OTHER LINUX DISTRIBUTION complains like that.

2) Configuring OMV is needlessly complex. I tried for a week to properly configure the shares. I seemed to get halfway there, but I never succeeded.

3) OMV doesn't support NTFS. I'm in the process of migrating 11 machines on my home network from Windows 7 to Linux. As you might guess, my old file server had NTFS drives in it. I had to shuttle files around and reformat the media drives to EXT4 so that OMV work. This process took FOUR DAYS.

Finally, I just got fed up, and installed Mint on the box. Five minutes later, I could see all of the shares on every machine on the network. Having been a Windows user since Windows 2.0, I am very accustomed to stuff that "just works", because I have stuff to actually accomplish.

For what it's worth, my file server is fairly huge . It's in a case that can hold up to 18 drives, has a quad-core CPU and 16GB of DDR3 RAM, and right now, has one 500GB drive, four 2TB drives, and a 3TB drive, and boots from a 32GB SSD. It serves media files to a NUC sitting in my living room that runs KODI.

Advice: If you're on a small home network with no user access issues to be concerned with, creating a simple file server is MUCH easier and more appropriate than setting up a "NAS".

Having said all that...

I have three Raspberry Pi 3B+ boards. Two of them run Pi-hole, and another will be running Pandora FMS when the thumb drive I ordered arrives. I love my Pi's, but I would never consider using them as a file server, or as a NAS. They just don't preform well enough. However, you shouldn't have a problem making your Pi a file server, but don't expect anything resembling a high-performance solution.

ejolson
Posts: 2050
Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2014 11:47 am

Re: Set Up RPI Model B as NAS: OMV vs Other Approaches

Thu Oct 18, 2018 4:37 pm

jonathanmoneill wrote:
Mon Oct 15, 2018 12:07 pm
I should say though it's not an RPi 3 it's the original model B I'm looking at but the only storage will be a seperately powered 500GB external hard drive and a 128GB USB stick so I'm hoping it should be fine.
For an original Pi B it is important to keep the software as simple and efficient as possible, especially if it is the 256MB version. For this reason I would recommend Raspbian Lite with Samba server installed. In this case configuration will be done from the command line. It would be helpful to know how to run a text editor such as vi or nano. If you've never done such a thing before the learning curve can seem a bit steep. For example, here is a thread that describes what is needed for a beginner to set up file sharing using Raspbian. Note that much of what you will learn consists of transferable skills which build your computer literacy. This could be useful for other projects later.

Open Media Vault tries to create a web interface that allows nontechnical users to manage the NAS configuration using a mouse. If you want to use this kind of mouse interface, you may be better off buying a cheap home NAS from Synology or QNAP.

Here is one final note. If you install OMV, you may need to go to the OMV forums for help and advice. Most of the expertise on those forums focuses on computers other than the Raspberry Pi. However, people definitely use OMV on the Raspberry Pi. If you install Raspbian, this forum is the place to get help. All of the expertise on this forum focuses on the Raspberry Pi. In either case, it would be nice to post the conclusions and results of your final setup here.

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