ggerard
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2015 4:48 pm

Oximeter with rpi

Sat Apr 18, 2015 5:38 pm

Knowing very little about electronics and nothing about Arduino, having just discovered rpi few months ago, I'd like to build an oximeter to measure the oxigen in blood.

The best I have found is through this sensor http://moderndevice.com/product/pulse-heartbeat-sensor/ where the instructions to use it are relative to Arduino-like platforms http://moderndevice.com/news/pulse-sens ... lights-on/

Then, ideally I'd like a python library and a python script, and some guide to do the electronics connections. Instead, moderndevice provide a c script (no experience with that, although I think I could understand it) and no visual help to see how this actually works and how the measures are made (this is a major barrier).

The question is, what would be the best approach? Try to write a python script that uses the .h library? Is it possible to use a rpi instead of an arduino here? Would it be better to learn Arduino-stuff and follow as much as possible the guide?

The objective here is to chose the fastest approach, and to discard this project if I see that this is out of my scope. What's your opinion?

User avatar
MarkHaysHarris777
Posts: 1820
Joined: Mon Mar 23, 2015 7:39 am
Location: Rochester, MN
Contact: Website

Re: Oximeter with rpi

Sat Apr 18, 2015 9:47 pm

Your project is fantastic. I am working on a similar project (will monitor oxygen and blood-sugar).

But, and this is not a discouragement, you are getting way ahead of yourself. The two articles you posted are a really good start. You are going to need to understand the data sheets thoroughly. I can not emphasize that enough.

Also, do not kid yourself. The RPi and the Arduino (or the Intel Edison(s) I'm working with) are two critically real categories called 'Electrical Engineering' and 'Software Engineering". Don't be fooled by the Italians who decided to call C|C++ coding 'sketching'. Its software engineering and in its simplest form its brutally difficult! Start learning to code with an Arduino (uses C|C++ to sketch) and an LED blinking light. Start there. Do not start with an oxymeter.. work up to that!

You are going to need to understand electronics. Its that simple. Now, Arduino has simplified a lot for you (analog reads are a snap) pwm just works, and the pin voltage levels are forgiving. The Due, the RPi, and especially the Intel Edison ARE NOT forgiving. If you do not understand your voltage levels and you make a simple mistake your RPi will be fried. ... words to the wise.

Start simple. I remember the first day I got my Arduino. I powered it on, carefully measured its voltage levels and then made its on-board LED blink (to make sure it worked) and then I 'played' around with the IDE and that LED (there is a lot you can do with one blinking LED by the way) until I understood how the IDE worked, how the library worked, how the Arduino is organized, and how the pin system is configured. You do not start with NO knowledge and build and oxymeter. You start slow, learn what you can, and work up to where you would like to be. You may be able to find local folks who can do some hand holding. Network with people. Don't be surprised if you get no reply or limited reply to such a question on-line though. You are jumping to high with not enough jump and without the proper background. Start simple and work up ... its a rewarding journey.
marcus
:ugeek:

ggerard
Posts: 22
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2015 4:48 pm

Re: Oximeter with rpi

Mon Apr 20, 2015 7:22 am

Hi Marcus,

Thanks for the reply. I was a total ignorant about electronics few months ago, but now I start making sense of it thanks to the rpi.

To clarify, it's not that this would be my first project. I'm actually entering into the world of servos, to continue my project of movement-triggered led-and-photo "device", which now is functional and I'm trying to optimise more. And now I also feel confident with python, considering I come from similar languages. That said, I still am one of those that needs to follow guidelines. I am totally ignorant of Arduino, and I have always tried to avoid compiled languages for the sake of productivity.

My problem here is that I cannot see how big is this oximeter project compared with my (growing) expertise. Since I only know the name about Arduino, and since there's no detailed (enough) instructions of how to use that sensor for my purposes, I'm afraid of loosing time into something that will need tons of time while I could be better working on other simpler projects to monitor a baby state (such as movement-monitor).

Your message here is that this is complicated, and you suggest me to start from something simple. Now I tell you I did this some time ago and now I feel ok with rpi and projects like ... I don't know, like this
http://www.instructables.com/id/Pan-Til ... /?ALLSTEPS
And entering into something like this in the near future
https://chemise23.wordpress.com/2013/09 ... raspberry/

With this clarification, would you still say this oximeter project would be too challenging?
*I'm about to say yes, this is too challenging, but I wouldn't like to miss the chance of developing this if this is a realistic option

Best,
-Gerard



MarkHaysHarris777 wrote:Your project is fantastic. I am working on a similar project (will monitor oxygen and blood-sugar).

But, and this is not a discouragement, you are getting way ahead of yourself. The two articles you posted are a really good start. You are going to need to understand the data sheets thoroughly. I can not emphasize that enough.

Also, do not kid yourself. The RPi and the Arduino (or the Intel Edison(s) I'm working with) are two critically real categories called 'Electrical Engineering' and 'Software Engineering". Don't be fooled by the Italians who decided to call C|C++ coding 'sketching'. Its software engineering and in its simplest form its brutally difficult! Start learning to code with an Arduino (uses C|C++ to sketch) and an LED blinking light. Start there. Do not start with an oxymeter.. work up to that!

You are going to need to understand electronics. Its that simple. Now, Arduino has simplified a lot for you (analog reads are a snap) pwm just works, and the pin voltage levels are forgiving. The Due, the RPi, and especially the Intel Edison ARE NOT forgiving. If you do not understand your voltage levels and you make a simple mistake your RPi will be fried. ... words to the wise.

Start simple. I remember the first day I got my Arduino. I powered it on, carefully measured its voltage levels and then made its on-board LED blink (to make sure it worked) and then I 'played' around with the IDE and that LED (there is a lot you can do with one blinking LED by the way) until I understood how the IDE worked, how the library worked, how the Arduino is organized, and how the pin system is configured. You do not start with NO knowledge and build and oxymeter. You start slow, learn what you can, and work up to where you would like to be. You may be able to find local folks who can do some hand holding. Network with people. Don't be surprised if you get no reply or limited reply to such a question on-line though. You are jumping to high with not enough jump and without the proper background. Start simple and work up ... its a rewarding journey.

Return to “Advanced users”