SamplerBox – drop-and-play sampler

Massive thanks to Clive for babysitting this blog (he’s been both writing and editing) while I was away. Any relaxation I was still feeling from the vacation evaporated the moment I saw my inbox. It was good while it lasted.

Regular readers will know that my favourite Raspberry Pi projects are often the musical ones. So I was really pleased to find a message from Joseph Ernest at SamplerBox bobbing up among the top few hundred emails of that inbox this morning. SamplerBox is an open-source, sub-€99 sampler in a box (hence the name), and it’s beautifully simple: drop samples onto the SD card, hook up a MIDI keyboard, and you’ll end up with something like this:

SamplerBox has more than 128 voices of polyphony (which sounds like way too much until you consider things like sustain pedals on pianos), and can load sample sets up to 1GB. Plus, it comes in a really cute laser-cut wooden box.

Setup’s as easy as…Pi.

samplerbox

This isn’t a project to buy: it’s open source, and made for you to build. Which is something I’ll be doing as soon as Joseph’s finished his instructions – I’m already scoping out boxes. Thanks Joseph!

 

 

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Emoti – Visualising our Emotions

If you missed the updates recently, we’re currently running a 12-month programme for creative young people called Raspberry Pi Creative Technologists.

We have a Google+ community for the group to post ideas, share interesting links and ask each other for help and we hoped they would also use it to arrange to meet up outside of the organised field trips: within the first month, one of them found the Art Hackathon and suggested they go along and take part. Three of them went along and teamed up with some others. Yasmin wrote a full account of the hack…

I’ve always heard about how awesome Hackathons could be; they’re a chance to surround yourself with intelligent people who share the same interest, come up with inspiring ideas together and become engrossed in a project, with everyone chipping in to turn concept into reality over one weekend.

But I’m going to be perfectly honest with you here; however awesome this sounds, I can’t help but feel a tad intimidated by it all. There’s still so much I feel I have yet to learn and I always worry about how much of an asset (or a nuisance) I would be.

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So when I saw an opportunity to go to an Art Hackathon, which aspired to mix teams with different skill sets and types, I knew that I had to attend, and I’m so glad I did! With the Hackathon holding presentations by many talented people including Joel Lewis, Di Mainstone and Nick Rothwell, as well tables full of various tech and art supplies, there were no limitations to the amount of creativity that we could muster!

Yasmin and Milton

Yasmin and Milton

All of this inspired a creation that managed to win 2nd Place for Peoples Choice, and I can proudly say that I was a part of its development:

Emoti – Visualising our Emotions

Emoti shows the emotional state of the world through combined visual colours and audio, resulting in a beautifully chaotic representation of the emotional state of the world – or at least the twitterverse.

Using Twitter Widgets, our team was able to pull certain keywords from tweets being posted in real time and assign them to different emotion types, which meant being able to have constantly updated data on how people were feeling on twitter through these emotion-related keywords. The emotions we assigned them to were: Happy, Sad, Surprised, Afraid and Angry.

From this data we then created a simple HTML web-page with 5 divs, or blocks, of colour relating to the different emotion states. These would constantly change width depending on the data that was being collected from the tweets to give a visual representation of how many people were tweeting under each emotion:

  • Green = Happy
  • Blue = Sad
  • Yellow = Surprised
  • Pink = Afraid
  • Red = Angry

To make this experience of witnessing how the world feels and how frequently these emotions change more immersive, these visual representations are also accompanied with audio. We chose five audio tracks, one to depict each emotion, adding them into the web-page using the HTML5 audio tag, and adjusted their volume depending on the emotion-based twitter data with some JavaScript wizardry. This ended up with the clashing music types seemingly battling against each other, reflecting how hectic the live emotion states were and how rapidly they would change at random; one moment showing solely happiness, the next ultimate anger.

The Hackathon Effect

The Hackathon Effect

This was an Art Hackathon don’t forget, so, of course we had to present this data in a beautiful and intriguing way. What’s more intriguing than creating the illusion of 3D colour-changing ripples?!

For this effect, the designers in our team laser cut clear plastic to create the individual ripples and slotted them into a black board. I decided this would be the perfect opportunity to whip out my Raspberry Pi! We ran the web-page through the Pi and hooked it up to the HDMIPi, allowing a bright screen for our structure to be placed onto, so that the moving coloured blocks from below would shine onto the clear plastic and give the illusion of a 3D object.

Finally, the structure was put together in a dark, enclosed space, and the end product came to life, completely exceeding my expectations! Colours danced gracefully across the ripples, making us forget that there was even a web-page below. It was easy to get lost in the entrancing movement of pattern that the object seemed to create. As soon as you immerse yourself in the full experience, with audio as well as these entrancing visuals, it becomes a little overwhelming. Watching the colours is one thing, but hearing the clashes of audio really brings the message across that this is how people from around the world are feeling right now.

It’s both a marvel and a mess all at the same time; both beautiful and chaotic. Just like the emotions we feel and the complexity behind them.

Yes, it’s open source! Find the (somewhat messy) code here: https://github.com/itomblack/emotion-twitter

What I Gained…

Aside from the obvious: an awesome project, a better understanding of how to work in a team and improved coding skills, I managed to come away from the Hackathon feeling much more positive about what I, as an individual, can achieve. I may not be have been the most skilled coder in the room but I was still able to have meaningful input on the project, both creatively and through my development skills, which leaves me wondering what I was so worried about in the first place!

As well as this I’m so grateful to have had the pleasure of meeting many creative and genuinely lovely people. It was so interesting to see all of the various projects that everyone had made, each one entirely unique and fascinating in its own right.

Thank you to the people behind the Art Hackathon event and those intelligent folk within the Emoti Dream Team who helped bring it to life:

P.S. This is my very first blog, how am I doing? Let me know! (If you want to… No pressure…)

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Astro Pi Mission Update 3

Here at Pi Towers, Astro Pi fever is taking hold! Over the last few weeks there have been a number of things happening which we’re really excited about, so it’s time for an update.

astro pi

The first and most crucial bit of news for those of you furiously writing your competition entries is that you now have just a little more time. UK Space, the organisation managing the competition, have decided to give secondary students a whole extra week. As we were a week late in shipping the kits to our phase 1 winners the deadline is now Monday the 6th of July, by 10am, so get cracking!

Put this date in your diary, don’t forget.

To help you get to grips with programming the Astro Pi HAT we’ve created a couple of helpful resources.

Firstly, you can find out all about the hardware, its capabilities and get a detailed breakdown of the Python library using our Astro Pi Guide. It explains in detail all aspects of the library and provides some examples of how to use them.

However, if you just want to have a play and learn as you go, check out our Getting Started with Astro Pi resource which works through a series of examples and explores most of the the Python library.

You will create a series of interesting programs which make use of all of the Astro Pi sensors like this reaction game.

There’s a great interactive demo for exploring the IMU (movement) sensor and you can also experiment with pressure, following Dave’s example:

Astro Pi HATs are also starting to appear in the wild — loads of competition entrants have been receiving their Astro Pi HATs and excitedly tweeting about it.

Others within our community have been playing around creating examples and resources. The awesome Martin O’Hanlon has put together a getting started tutorial as well as building this amazing interactive Astro Pi in Minecraft:

Dan Aldred, one of our Raspberry Pi Certified Educators, has put together some great resources for using Astro Pi with his students. Visit his website to find a great language reference booklet.

We also have a number of examples compiled by Ben Nuttall and available on Github.

If you’re looking for more technical help with Astro Pi check out our Astro Pi forum.

As you can see we’re all super excited about the Astro Pi Launch! You can keep an eye on our progress as we get closer to lift-off by following social media channels. In the next few weeks the flight hardware is going to be assembled and tested!

PS

SPAAAAAAAAAAACCCCEEEE!!!!!!

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Getting started with the Internet of Things

By 2020 there will be twelvety gigajillion of Internet Things all shouting at each other and sulking – Alice Bevel

The Internet of Things had been around for a while (since 1982 apparently) but it’s still a bit of a mystery to many. The concept of hooking up physical devices and letting them talk to each other is great, but how do you get started? How do you get useful data from them?

A Thing

A Thing

I’ve been playing around with IoT this week and came across this great starter IoT project for the Pi, a people counting project by Agustin Pelaez. It’s an oldie but goodie and worth a mention because it’s as simple as it gets in terms of IoT—a sensor sends data to a server, which then presents the data in a nice, human-friendly form.

PIR connected to Pi

A £2 PIR connected directly to the Pi with just three wires ( Photo: Agustin Pelaez)

It’s also as cheap as chips—apart from a Pi you only need a passive infra-red sensor (PIR) as used in several of our resources. We love PIRs: they cost a couple of quid, connect directly to the Pi GPIO pins and they can be used for all sorts of useful and/or mad projects. The basic Ubidots account that stores and analyses the data is free. So this is an ideal IoT beginners’ project— cheap, straightforward and can be adapted to other projects. (Note that there is a bug in the code, peopleev = 0 should read peoplecount = 0.)

node-red and thingbox

Node-RED on Thingbox, controlling LEDs on the Pi via the web (Photo: thethingbox.io)

If you want to dig further without too much pain, the ThingBox has an SD card image for the Pi that allows you to “Install Internet of Things technologies on a Raspberry Pi without any technical knowledge” and has a number of basic projects to get you started. It works with Ubidots out of the box and has a number of tutorials that will help you learn common IoT tools like Node-RED on the Pi (including a PIR counter project which is a nice compare-and-contrast  to the Python based one above.)

I like the ThingBox a lot. It lowers the activation energy needed to get started with IoT on the Pi (actually, it makes it easy) and it allows all Pi owners access to what appears at first glance to be an arcane … Thing. The Internet of Things is fun, useful and empowering, and a natural extension to physical computing using the GPIO pins on the Pi. Hook up some Things today and have play.

Another Thing

Another Thing

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Pocket PiGRRL: is that an emulator in your pocket?

PiGRRL and robot

Huge, city-destroying robot for scale (Photo: Adafruit/ Ruiz Brothers)

Last year we went into full retronerd dribble mode over the PiGRRL, a Pi-powered Gameboy. Our friends at Adafruit have brought the project up to date with the Pocket PiGRRL. It has a 3D printed case and uses the smaller Raspberry model A+ plus a 2.4″ PiTFT HAT to bring the size down. Emulation is handled by RetroPie.

Adafruit say that “it’s easier than our previous PiGRRL build” and the use of components such as the amplifier and charger means that it’s suitable for a confident beginner—at the very least you’ll earn your soldering skills badge.

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The Inquirer Tech Hero Awards

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This is not a flashy post with lots of pictures and farkles. It’s a thank you note.

In February 2012 we started selling the Raspberry Pi  (you may not have heard the story—it went pretty well ;)). A year later we moved into a small office. There were six of us.

Our very first office. Aww, cute.

Our very first office. Aww, cute.

Less than a year later we stormed the penthouse floor of the same building and have been there ever since. (We even have our own fridge now so we don’t have to write our names on our pies with a Sharpie). And here we are three years later—things have gone swimmingly and we’ve picked up one or two awards (OK, lots) along the way. We love getting awards but not (just) in a big-headian way. They are a confirmation that we are doing something right and doing something good.

Last night I travelled on the InterCity to London to attend the first ever Inquirer Tech Hero Awards (Liz and Eben are away and I was sent because I most resemble him physically). We were nominated in three categories: The Raspberry Pi 2 won ‘Best Product’ and Eben won ‘Tech Champion’. We had a great night, chatted to a load of people and we brought back two impressive chunks of glass that say, “Keep doing your thing, it’s good.”

The best photo I could manage - these things are shiny AND transparent

The best photo I could manage – these things are shiny AND transparent

So thanks to the Inquirer and to everyone who voted. But the biggest thank you goes to our amazing, unique and lovely community. We wouldn’t be here without you. Cheers.

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Two factor authentication safe deposit box

github 2fa dialog

A skilled hacker attempts to crack 2FA

Securing your digital life with two-factor authentication (2FA) is pretty common nowadays. A password alone just doesn’t hack it. (Or does it?) Typically, 2FA on the web requires a one-time code, sent to your phone, as well as your password to log in. Other systems may use factors such as biometrics (e.g. fingerprints) or hardware dongles. (My own bank requires me to use a silly little (very losable) card reader every time I want to transfer a fiver.)

Safety deposit box with two-factor authentication

Safety deposit box with two-factor authentication

Thinking inside the box

Pablo Carranza Vélez decided to apply the principle of 2FA to a physical object, a Raspberry Pi controlled safe deposit box. To get into the box you need both your personal entry code and the code sent to your phone. This then triggers a solenoid to unlock the box.

Lots of cool stuff going on

The box uses resin.io and Authy API. Full details, schematics and code can be found on  Pablo’s hackster.io page. It’s a simple concept but there’s lots going on in terms of hardware and software—Authy, resin.io, MongoDB, node.js, Bootstrap, breadboard circuits, solenoids—to make a great project and an interesting proof of concept. It’s also an excellent introduction to the contemporary technologies used and there’s even some computer science with a nod to state machines.

Opening the resin safebox from Pablo Carranza Vélez on Vimeo.

A pre-emptive note thing

“Just hold on this minute!” shouts a completely imaginary concerned reader. “You could (literally) brute force it with a sledge hammer/ hack it with a giant Wile E. Coyote magnet/ steal the building it was attached to / drill a hole in it and send in a tiny monkey to feebly tug at the solenoid.” Well yes, you could. To all of them.

Our advice is: do not make one of these to store your ultra-rare U2 Panini stickers in as they might get nicked (my brother swears to this day that it wasn’t him who drew NHS specs on Bono in red biro). The 2FA safe box is a thought provoking Raspberry Pi / IoT project, not the Old Lady of Threadneedle Street, lawks! (I’ve always wanted to write that, it’s a cracking name :))

Solenoid control breadboard prototype

Solenoid control breadboard prototype

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Snapping Stills with the Red TED Letters

TED2015 Photo Booth

I’m a bit of a TED talk fiend, so I was delighted to find out that a few Raspberry Pis had a hand in letting TEDsters capture their photo along with the iconic red TED letters at TED2015 in Vancouver. To explain:

A funny thing happens at the end of every TED — after the show wraps, first one brave person, and then duos and groups, rush the stage to get their picture taken with the red TED letters. So at TED2015, our tech team thought, why not bring the letters out to the conference floor and let everyone play? In a nights-and-weekends project, our engineers built a self-service photobooth that encouraged all TEDsters — attendees, staff and more — to strike a pose. By the end of the conference, 1,296 photos had been taken with the booth.

“A lot of people wanted to get jump shots,” says software engineer Joshua Warchol, who helped conceptualize and build the booth. “Some groups would spend 10 minutes trying to get the perfect aerial moment. And I also had not anticipated that people would feel an unstoppable compulsion to climb the letters. We had to get them repainted mid-week because of nicks and scuffs.”

We see a lot of people implementing great photo booths with Raspberry Pi, but what I especially like about this one is that it’s activated when a group scans their NFC badges. After the photo is taken, it automatically emails it to the group that badged in. Of course, the whole operation comes together with a lot of different off-the-shelf technologies working in concert. Along with the Raspberry Pis, there’s a tablet interface, Adafruit NFC reader, a camera, and a BlinkStick LED module to indicate the camera’s position and status. Luckily for us, Joshua posted all the details about how he pulled this off, including the code. Thanks, Joshua!

Interface

Camera1

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Modulo: a simple, modular solution for building electronic devices

We came across the excellent Modulo on Kickstarter recently. Modulo is a “modular solution for building powerful electronic devices” and consists of a cluster of smart modules such as sensors, motor drivers and displays that slide into a solid base unit.

modulo

It abstracts all the jumbliness of building electronics from scratch and lets you concentrate on concepts, design and programming cool stuff.

Once you’ve built your project you can program it in Python on the Pi. It also plays nice with Arduino and Spark (now Particle).

Poseidon, a robotic landscape watering system. Using Modulo and a Pi it delivers just the right amount of water based on the weather forecast.

Poseidon, a robotic landscape watering system. Using Modulo and a Pi it delivers just the right amount of water based on the weather forecast.

The Raspberry Pi crew met the Modulo team at MakerCon this week and were, of course, challenged to Modulo Pong. Eben won 26-14 (I completely made that up based on a recurring dream in which the score is always the same and Eben is dressed as a giant ping pong ball.)

Modulo controlled Pong

Modulo controlled Pong

We like Modulo a lot. It’s smart, funky and a great way to get into digital creativity. Also, it has “Knob kit” and a tea brewing robot and it would be very un-British of us on both counts if we didn’t let that influence us.

Modulo has already reached its primary Kickstarter goal but is now aiming for sufficient funding to make Modulo a sustainable concern. Take a look if, like us, you’d like to see this happen.

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