Tag:
music hacks
We received an email a little while back from Christian Schwöbel in Germany. He’d found one of our blog posts from a couple of years back, about a guitar effects unit, and thought we might be interested in his project too. It’s a light organ built into a guitar pedalboard, with LPD8806 strips to provide... Continue reading
When someone mailed me a link to this performance, I assumed it was going to be one of those setups where two pianists play jolly tunes together in a bar. How wrong I was. These two pianists (Alvise Sinivia and Léo Jassef from the Conservatoire National de Paris) are trying to kill each other in... Continue reading
To celebrate the launch of Sonic Pi 2 we held the inaugural Sonic Pi competition. We were looking for some of the best space-themed music, coded with Sonic Pi v2.0 on a Raspberry Pi by school children in the UK aged between 7-16 years – and we were not disappointed. After a month of judging, Dr Sam... Continue reading
At a Princeton hackathon a while back, Bonnie Eisenman did something rather wonderful to a flight of stairs using a Raspberry Pi, some lights, an Arduino and a handful of photoresistors. Bonnie, I can’t believe you only won second prize. This is amazing. A while later, Bonnie made build instructions and code available on Instructables – and since... Continue reading
What do you get if you cross a Nintendo Entertainment System (NES), a Guitar Hero Controller, a Famicom Controller, a Raspberry Pi and a toy keyboard? What you actually get is this: a homemade keytar which uses the NES’s lovely grungy old 8-bit analogue sound chip to make sweet, sweet synthesised tunes. Theremin Hero has built the keytar... Continue reading
What do you get if you cross a Raspberry Pi; 57 geometrically tiled, thumb-sized joysticks; a spot of multiplexing; and some Bach? A completely new musical instrument, that’s what. David Sharples says: We wanted to invent an entirely new electronic musical instrument, and there were two things we wanted to focus on in the design of... Continue reading
I’m on the fence about whether or not this is an effective way to learn how to play the piano: but it’s definitely an effective way to learn about electronics, Python, servo motors, and why lasers are cool. Shane Snipe and his dad took about 50 hours to put this project together – astonishingly, neither... Continue reading
When we wrote about accelerating Fast Fourier Transforms (FFTs) on the Pi back in January, several people asked what sort of real-world application FFTs can have. We talked about numerical analysis, cryptography, spectrograms and software-defined radio, among other things, in the comments on that post. All the same, FFTs are something that those who don’t... Continue reading
So you’re at SXSW. And you want an up-to-the-minute cookie. What could be nicer than a customised Oreo, filled, flavoured and printed with the aid of a Raspberry Pi (in such a way that you can watch what’s happening yourself) all depending on what’s trending on Twitter at the moment? Our good friend Matt Richardson... Continue reading
Jhonny Göransson was part of the team that made what’s simply the daftest and most wonderful music hack we’ve seen so far. The moment he tweeted about it last night, we knew we had to show it to you as soon as we could. It’s called Panflute Hero. Panflute Hero was the result of a... Continue reading