superuser password


5 posts
by go2ford » Mon May 06, 2013 2:36 am
Hi,

Before I try hooking my pi to the net, I'd like to clear up a few things.
1. Is the default 'pi' account the SU -- it doesn't appear that it is ( nor would i expect it to be)
2. Assuming that SU account is accessed by typing su -- is there a default password for this? I haven't come across anything that says that, I do see references to just typing su

I have read that I can set a superuser password by
'sudo passwd root' -- which leads to a request for current and new pws

Am I being paranoid to think that I should have an su password?

I am planning on changing my pi account and probably adding a new user account, but I wondered about the su.

Thanks,

hj
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by ghans » Mon May 06, 2013 6:44 am
The root account is disabled/has no password on
the Foundation image . "You should use sudo instead" .
The default account is pi.

ghans
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by yottskry » Tue May 07, 2013 12:38 pm
go2ford wrote:I have read that I can set a superuser password by
'sudo passwd root' -- which leads to a request for current and new pws


The current password it's requesting is for the user Pi, not for superuser (root).
The new password will be for root.
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by Joe Schmoe » Tue May 07, 2013 2:14 pm
I wish to point out that the whole idea of sudo is brain-dead [*] and is needlessly confusing for beginners. It leads to such abominations as "sudo echo 1 > /sys/something" (Permission denied, because the redirections is done by the shell before running sudo). I.e., you can't just stick "sudo" in from of any command and make it work as expected.

The best way to get around the OP's instant issue and so many others is just, when you want/need to do stuff as root, do: sudo bash
and work from there.

[*] It seems to me to be a classic instance of the "Well, this is good on the industrial strength mainframe - therefore, it must be good for the home user (and, doubly so for the single user SBC - i.e., the Pi). sudo does make sense in an industrial setting, where, truly, Unix's "all or none" security model is anemic.
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by yottskry » Tue May 07, 2013 8:05 pm
Joe Schmoe wrote:I wish to point out that the whole idea of sudo is brain-dead [*] and is needlessly confusing for beginners. It leads to such abominations as "sudo echo 1 > /sys/something" (Permission denied, because the redirections is done by the shell before running sudo). I.e., you can't just stick "sudo" in from of any command and make it work as expected.

The best way to get around the OP's instant issue and so many others is just, when you want/need to do stuff as root, do: sudo bash
and work from there.

[*] It seems to me to be a classic instance of the "Well, this is good on the industrial strength mainframe - therefore, it must be good for the home user (and, doubly so for the single user SBC - i.e., the Pi). sudo does make sense in an industrial setting, where, truly, Unix's "all or none" security model is anemic.


It's all about using the right too for the job, really.
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